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PUBLIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT

FLORIDA PETROLEUM REPROCESSORS
DAVIE, BROWARD COUNTY, FLORIDA


APPENDIX

Map of Florida Showing Location of Broward County
Figure 1. State Map Showing Location of Broward County

Location of Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund National Priorities List Site in Broward County
Figure 2. Location of Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund National Priorities List Site in Broward County

FPR Site as defined by Florida Department of Health
Figure 3. FPR Site as defined by Florida Department of Health

Soil Sample Locations Outside of the Fenced FPR Property
Figure 4. Soil Sample Locations Outside of the Fenced FPR Property

FPR Site as Defined for Groundwater Contamination North of New River Canal and Detail of Location of Residences Currently Using Private Wells
Figure 5. FPR Site as Defined for Groundwater Contamination North of New River Canal and Detail of Location of Residences Currently Using Private Wells


Table 1.

Groundwater under FPR Property Chemicals of Concern
Compounds Maximum ug/L Screening Value ug/L Source of Screening Value Retain Chemical For Further Evaluation
PCE

260

0.7

CREG

YES

TCE

200,000

3

CREG

YES

1,1,1-Trichloroethane

140,000

200

LTHA

YES

1,1-Dichloroethene

9,800

0.06

CREG

YES

1,1-Dichloroethane

30,000

none

YES

1,2-Dichloroethene Total

270,000

2000

Int. EMEG Child

YES

cis-1,2-Dichloroethene

260,000

3000

Int. EMEG Child

YES

Vinyl Chloride

18,000

0.2

EMEG Child

YES

Toluene

7,600

200

Int. EMEG Child

YES

Chloroethane

6,900

none

YES (Default)

Benzene

14

1

CREG

YES

3,4-Dimethylphenol

160

none

YES (Default)

2-Methylnaphthalene

170

none

YES (Default)

2-Methylphenol (o-cresol)

25

none

YES (Default)

Phenanthrene

8

none

YES (Default

Manganese

410

50

RMEG Child

YES

EMEG: ATSDR's Chronic Environmental Media Evaluation Guidelines for a child
RMEG: Reference Dose Media Evaluation Guide for a child
CREG: Cancer Risk Evaluation Guide for a one in a million excess cancer risk
Int. EMEG ATSDR's Intermediate duration exposure Chronic Environmental Media Evaluation Guidelines for a child
ug/l: microgram per liter
ND/NA = no data, not detected, or not analyzed for


Table 2.

Groundwater outside of FPR Property, North of New River Canal Chemicals of Concern
Compounds Maximum ug/L Screening Value ug/L Source of Screening Value Retain Chemical For Further Evaluation
Manganese 230 50 YES
Bromodichloromethane 1 0.6 CREG YES
Chloromethane 4 3 LTHA YES
1,1-Dichloroethene

30

0.06

CREG

YES

1,1-Dichloroethane 27 none YES
1,2-Dichloroethene Total 160 2000 Int EMEG Child YES
Chloroethane 10 none YES
Vinyl Chloride

90

0.2

Chronic EMEG Child

YES


Table 3.

Groundwater outside of FPR Property, South of New River Canal Chemicals of Concern
Compounds Maximum ug/L Screening Value ug/L Source of Screening Value Retain Chemical For Further Evaluation
1,1-Dichloroethene

94

0.06

CREG

YES
TCE

6

3

CREG

YES

1,1-Dichloroethane 83 none YES
Vinyl Chloride

330

0.2

Chronic EMEG Child

YES

Benzene

10

1

CREG

YES
Manganese 210 50 RMEG Child YES
Bromodichloromethane 14 0.6 CREG YES
1,1,2,2-Trichloroethane 4 0.2 CREG

YES


Table 4.

Surface Soil inside the fenced FPR Property Chemicals of Concern
Compounds Max mg/kg Screening Value mg/kg Source of Screening Value Retain Chemical for Further Evaluation
2-Methylnaphthalene

3.7

none

YES (Default)
TCE

80

60

CREG

YES

1,1,1-Trichloroethane

87

none

YES (Default)

Phenanthrene

2.1

none

YES (Default)
1,1-Dichloroethane

2.4

none

YES (Default)

Cobalt

1.1

none

YES (Default)
Copper

19

none

YES (Default)
Lead

300

none

YES (Default)
Benzo(a)pyrene

0.11

0.1

CREG

YES
Benzo(bk)flouranthene

0.1

none

YES (Default)
Benzo(ghi)perylene

0.18

none

YES (Default)
Chrysene

0.074

none

YES (Default)
mg/kg: milligram per kilogram


Table 5.

Subsurface Soil inside the fenced FPR Property Chemicals of Concern
Compounds Max mg/kg Screening Value mg/kg Source of Screening Value Retain Chemical for Further Evaluation
PCE

120

10

CREG

YES

TCE

810

60

CREG

YES

1,1,1-Trichloroethane

490

none

YES (Default)

1,1-Dichloroethane 13 none

YES (Default)

2-Methylnaphthalene

28

none

YES (Default)
Phenanthrene

12

none

YES (Default)
Chloromethane

0.78

none

YES (Default)
Cobalt

1.3

none

YES (Default)
Copper

240

none

YES (Default)
Lead

1600

none

YES (Default)
Methylene Chloride

2

none

YES (Default)
Naphthalene

15

none

YES (Default)
Benzo(bk)flouranthene

0.11

none

YES (Default)

Benzo(ghi)perylene

0.058

none

YES (Default)
Chrysene

0.07

none

YES (Default)


Table 6.

Surface Soil outside the fenced FPR Property Chemicals of Concern
Compounds Max mg/kg Screening Value mg/kg Source of Screening Value Retain Chemical for Further Evaluation
2-Methylnaphthalene

3.7

none

YES (Default)

Phenanthrene

2.1

none

YES (Default)

Endrin Aldehyde

0.0018

none

YES (Default)

Cobalt

0.52

none

YES (Default)

Copper

9.9

none

YES (Default)

Lead

22

none

YES (Default)

Carbazole

0.22

none

YES (Default)

Dibenzofuran

0.065

none

YES (Default)

Benzo(a)pyrene

2.4

0.1

CREG

YES

Benzo(bk)flouranthene

3.8

none

YES (Default)

Benzo(ghi)perylene

0.8

none

YES (Default)

Chrysene

1.5

none

YES (Default)

Dibenzo(ah)anthracene

0.26

none

YES (Default)

Indeno(cd)pyrene

0.81

none

YES (Default)

Benzo(a)anthracene

1.5

none

YES (Default)


Table 7.

Subsurface Soil Outside the Fenced FPR Property Chemicals of Concern
Compounds Maximum mg/kg Screening Value mg/kg Source of Screening Value Location of Maximum
Phenanthrene 0.044 none YES (Default)
Copper 1.3 none YES (Default)
Lead 2.5 none YES (Default)
Copper 1.3 none YES (Default)
Chrysene 0.053 none YES (Default)


Table 8.

Sediment Data
Compounds Max mg/kg Screening Value mg/kg Source of Screening Value Retain Chemical for Further Evaluation
Phenanthrene 0.74 none YES (Default)
Cobalt 1.5 none YES (Default)
Copper 64 none YES (Default)
Lead 85 none YES (Default)
Aluminum 4600 none YES (Default)
Benzo(a)pyrene 1.4 0.1 CREG YES
Benzo(bk)flouranthene 3.6 none YES (Default)
Benzo(ghi)perylene 0.6 none YES (Default)
Chrysene 1.4 none YES (Default)
Indeno(cd)pyrene 0.6 none YES (Default)
Dibutylphthalate 0.23 none YES (Default)


Table 9.

Completed Exposure Pathway Elements
Pathway Name Exposure Pathway Elements Time
Source Environmental Media Point of Exposure Route of Exposure Exposed Population
Groundwater north of New River Canal FPR property Groundwater Private wells ingestion inhalation residents past
Surface soil inside fenced FPR property FPR property surface soil surface soil on FPR property ingestion inhalation residents and workers past, current, future
Surface soil outside fenced FPR property FPR property, roadways surface soil residences, businesses, undeveloped land ingestion inhalation residents past, current, future
Sediment FPR property, roadways sediment ditch ingestion inhalation residents past, current, future


Table 10.

Comparison Values
Compounds Oral MRL
mg/kg-d (ATSDR)
Inhalation MRL ppm (ATSDR) Reference Dose mg/kg-d (IRIS 1998) Potency factor (mg/kg-d)-1 (IRIS 1998) Unit Risk (ug/m3)-1 (IRIS 1998)
PCE 0.05 0.04 0.01
TCE 0.2 0.1
1,1,1-Trichloroethane 0.7
1,1-Dichloroethene 0.009 0.02 0.009 0.6 5E-5
1,1-Dichloroethane
1,2-Dichloroethene Total 0.2 (trans) 0.2
cis-1,2-Dichloroethene 0.3 0.2
Vinyl Chloride 0.00002 0.03 2.3 8.4E-5****
Toluene 1 0.2
Chloroethane 15
Benzene 0.004 0.29 8.3E-6
3,4-Dimethylphenol 0.001
2-Methylnaphthalene
2-Methylphenol (o-cresol) 0.05 0.05
Phenanthrene
Manganese 0.005** 0.00004 mg/m3 0.14
Bromodichloromethane 0.02 0.62
1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane 0.04 0.4 0.2 5.8E-5
Chloromethane 0.05 0.004*
Endrin Aldehyde 0.0003***
Cobalt 0.00003 mg/m3
Copper
Lead
Aluminum
Methylene Chloride 0.06 0.03 0.0075 4.7E-7
Naphthalene 0.02 0.002
Carbazole
Dibenzofuran
Benzo(a)pyrene 7.3
Benzo(bk)flouranthene
Benzo(ghi)perylene
Chrysene
Dibenzo(ah)anthracene
Indeno(cd)pyrene
Benzo(a)anthracene
Dibutylphthalate
2-Hexanone
*EPA Office of Water reference dose
**Reference dose for water consumption as opposed to manganese in food
***MRL for endrin
**** Calculated from inhalation potency factor 2.98 (mg/kg/d)-1

Attachment 1
Developing an Exposure Dose

Drinking Contaminated Groundwater
We estimated an exposure dose of each contaminant a person might receive by drinkingthe contaminated groundwater (Risk Assistant, 1994). We used the maximum contaminantlevel found in groundwater. Children represent a sensitive subpopulation and doses thatare protective of children are most likely protective of adults. For non-cancerouscompounds, we estimated the exposure dose that an elementary school child, weighing 24kilograms (50 pounds), would receive drinking about a half liter of contaminatedgroundwater a day, 250 days a year for 6 years. For carcinogenic compounds, weestimated an exposure dose that an adult, weighing 70 kilograms (150 pounds), wouldreceive over a lifetime (70 years) of drinking 2 liters contaminated groundwater a day.

Household Use of Contaminated Groundwater
Contaminants in domestic water may evaporate from various water sources in the homeand contaminate indoor air. People may be exposed to contaminants by breathingcontaminated air. To estimate indoor air concentrations, we used the maximumcontaminant level found in groundwater. For non-carcinogenic compounds, we estimatedan exposure dose an elementary school child would receive from breathing contaminatedindoor air, 9 hours a day, 250 days a year. We estimate children breath at a rate of 0.76cubic meters an hour. For carcinogenic compounds, we estimated an exposure dose anadult would receive from breathing contaminated indoor air, 21 hours a day, 350 days a year for 70 years (Risk Assistant, 1994).

Exposure to Contaminated Soil
Exposure to surface soil is currently a completed exposure pathway and exposure tosubsurface soil is a potential exposure pathway. We assume children consume asignificant amount of soil, relative to adults, as a result of outdoor play. When children haveaccess to areas of contaminated soil, they may incidentally eat the soil resulting in asignificant source of exposure to contaminants. Even though adults are less likely to eatsignificant amounts of soil, soil ingestion remains a potentially significant source ofexposure to environmental contaminants through hand-mouth activities, smoking andeating. We estimated an exposure dose of each contaminant a child (for potential non-cancer effects) and adult (for potential carcinogenic effects) might receive by coming intocontact with contaminated soil.

For non-cancerous compounds in soil, we estimated the exposure dose that an elementaryschool child, weighing 24 kilograms (50 pounds), would receive by incidentally eating 200milligrams of contaminated soil 350 days a year for 6 years. Children represent a sensitivesubpopulation and doses that are protective of children are most likely protective of adults. For carcinogenic compounds, we estimated an exposure dose that an adult, weighing 70kilograms (150 pounds), would receive over a lifetime (70 years) of incidentally ingesting100 milligrams of soil a day, 350 days out of the year (Risk Assistant, 1994).

The amount of dust from contaminated soils residents might breathe was also estimated. For a child we used an inhalation value of 0.76 cubic meters an hour which corresponds toone-third of a day at rest and the rest of the day doing light activity. For adults, we used1.67 cubic meter per hour which corresponds to on-third of the day at rest and theremaining day divided between light, moderate and heavy activity (Risk Assistant, 1994).

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