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PUBLIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT

FORT ORD
MARINA, MONTEREY COUNTY, CALIFORNIA


APPENDIX A: LAND USE DESCRIPTIONS (from FORA, 1994)

This section includes land use descriptions keyed to the map given in Figure 2.

For purposes of public discussion, the land use polygon descriptions are presented by land use jurisdiction. The polygon boundaries are subject to revision as the Base Reuse Plan (BRP) is refined. These goals were established as part of the Fort Ord Task Force Strategy, June 1992. Many of the descriptions that follow are further delineated in Section VI of BRP.

City of Marina

Polygon 1a: Gross Acreage: 390, AIRPORT (AIR). The former Fritzsche Army Airfield (now renamed marina Municipal Airport) will be converted into a general aviation facility which will complement the adjoining University of California (UC) Center for Science, Technology, Education and Policy (STEP Center). The existing facilities will be reused and 31 acres in the polygon north of the runway will be available for new development desiring an airport location.

Polygon 1b: Gross Acreage: 130, HABITAT PRESERVATION (HAB). This area will be acquired as part of the Fritzsche Airfield conveyance and will be managed for its habitat value by the University of California, except for areas needed for access or utilities (e.g. runway lighting). The area is retained by Marina as a buffer at the end of the runway but managed by the University of California Natural Reserve System as a coastal scrub/grassland habitat adjacent to University Research Area. Good potential exists for spine flower enhancement. This could also provide a link or corridor to riparian habitat of the Salinas river.

Polygon 1c and 1f: Gross Acreage: 313, AIRPORT (AIR). Most of this area will be available for business park, commercial, industrial and airport related uses which will provide income to help support the operations of the airport. Approximately 60 acres will have development restrictions because of FAA requirements.

Polygon 1d and 1e: Gross Acreage: 51, HABITAT PRESERVATION (HAB). These areas include Fort Ord's riparian habitat of the Salinas River and the bluffs above the river.

Polygon 2a: Gross Acreage: 113, RETAIL (RET). Sixty percent of this area will be available for retail, commercial and office uses. The remaining 40 percent will be protected open space for the sensitive species found in the area, including the Yadon's piperia, a locally rare plant that exists only in this area.

Polygon 2b: Gross Acreage: 334, HIGH DENSITY RESIDENTIAL/CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT (HR/CBUS). This is a mixed use area which will provide opportunities for development of an urban core adjacent to both Highway 1 and the California State University (CSU) campus. This area also boasts excellent bay views available for a combination of multi-family residential and commercial/office/cultural uses, much of which can be integrated to take advantage of pedestrian and transit opportunities as well as the excellent freeway access. Although non-residential development would probably precede much of the residential development, about 65% of the development would be for residential use combined with the parks and schools to serve the residential. The remaining 35 percent would be commercial/office/cultural uses, some of which may be separate from residential development. The maximum residential density would be 14 units per gross acre.

Polygon 2c: Gross Acreage: 111, HIGH TECH BUSINESS PARK (TECH). This area will be redeveloped with business park uses, many of which will occur partially as a result of the nearby CSU campus and the UC Science, Technology, Education and Policy Center.

Polygon 2d: Gross Acreage: 82, RETAIL/HIGH DENSITY RESIDENTIAL (RET/HR). This area would be available to provide a mixture of commercial and residential uses which would support the faculty, staff and students of the adjoining CSU campus. The maximum residential density would be 14 units per gross acre.

Polygon 2e: Gross Acreage: 40, CORPORATION YARD (CORP). This area will contain public agency corporation yards currently planned by the City of Marina, the County of Monterey and the Monterey-Salinas Transit. This area also immediately adjoins the corporation yard planned for the CSU campus.

Polygon 2f: Gross Acreage: 7, BUS TRANSFER CENTER (BTC). This area will be used for a Bus Transfer Center.

Polygon 2a: Gross Acreage: 36, EQUESTRIAN CENTER (EQC). The existing equestrian center will be retained within this area and it may be expanded to additional related uses, all of which will have access to appropriate areas and trails in the undeveloped lands to be held by public agencies.

Polygon 3: Gross Acreage: 30, COMMUNITY COLLEGE (UNIV/CC). This area will be used for a new community college campus.

Polygon 4: Gross Acreage: 665, LOW DENSITY RESIDENTIAL (LR). This low density residential area contains the existing Patton Park and Abrams Park subdivisions.

Polygon 4a: Gross Acreage: 16, SCHOOL (SCH). This is the existing Patton School.

Polygon 5a: Gross Acreage: 59, RETAIL (RET). This area will be utilized for retail development.

Polygon 5b: Gross Acreage: 5, RETAIL (RET). This small area will be utilized for retail development.

Polygon 5c: Gross Acreage: 11, UNIVERSITY RESEARCH AREA (URA). This area provides the corridor linkage from the maritime chaparral around the airfield to the habitats in the interior. Restoration potential is good.

Polygon 7b: Gross Acreage: 345, UNIVERSITY RESEARCH AREA (URA). This is one of the most important habitat management areas identified in this BRP. It contains higher densities of sensitive species than any other habitat on Fort Ord. This will be managed as habitat by the University of California Natural Reserve System.

Polygon 7c: Gross Acreage: 139, UNIVERSITY OFFICE (USO). This area is proposed for University of California educational, office and research purposes. Approximately 50 acres of this polygon will remain open space and will be incorporated into landscape management, providing opportunity for habitat enhancement. This is not critical for corridor linkage but has restoration/enhancement/public education potential.

Polygon 8b: Gross Acreage: 37, UNIVERSITY OFFICE (USO). A small area (approximately seven acres) may be available for habitat management. Most of this polygon will be developed for university related facilities.

Polygon 8c: Gross Acreage: 20, BUS TRANSFER CENTER (BTC) This site will be used in conjunction with the Bus Transfer Center as a parking area.

Polygon 8d: Gross Acreage: 7.2, GOLDEN GATE UNIVERSITY (GGU) This site will be used for the new campus of Golden Gate University.

Marina/Seaside/Monterey County

California State University Monterey Bay

Polygon 10 and 16: Gross Acreage: 1263, UNIVERSITY (UNIV). This is the site of the California State University Monterey Bay (CSUMB) campus is located on approximately 1300 acres of land, of which 1000 acres is developed. On approximately 500 acres of the developed land are located 1253 housing units to be used for CSUMB housing. Approximately 200 of these units are intended for use as faculty family housing, the remaining 1053 units are intended for use as student housing.

The remaining 500 acres of developed land have numerous permanent and temporary (World War II vintage wooden) structures. Of the permanent three-story, concrete structures, 21 are planned for seismic upgrade and renovation into lecture/laboratory spaces. These will serve as the academic core of CSUMB.

Additional facilities on this acreage include the following: 19 permanent, three-story, concrete structures that will be upgraded and renovated to serve as CSUMB residence halls (after upgrade and renovation, these structures will house approximately 1800 students).

Other permanent single-story and multi-story concrete structures will be upgraded and renovated to meet the administrative space needs of CSUMB. This area will also provide the sites where CSUMB will construct new facilities including additional residence halls, a permanent library building, and a science center as necessary to accommodate a planned 25,000 full time equivalent student campus.

The 300 acres of open, undeveloped land physically connects the area containing the 1253 housing units and the academic core. This area is planned for eventual expansion of not only the university curriculum (e.g., a future environmental studies center) but also possible additional housing units to serve the needs of the students and faculty.

Monterey County

Polygon 6a: Gross Acreage: 12, RESEARCH CENTER (RC). This area contains the existing US Army Reserve Training Center. If the Reserve Center is relocated, the proposed land use would be retail commercial.

Polygon 6b: Gross Acreage: 39, HABITAT PRESERVATION (HAB). This habitat area is to be retained by Monterey County (or transferred to UNRS) to provide further biological linkage/corridor connections between high value areas to the Northwest and Southeast.

Polygon 7a: Gross Acreage: 284, UNIVERSITY/SCIENCE/OFFICE (USO). This area proposed for University of California educational, science, technology and development purposes.

Polygon 8a: Gross Acreage: 352, LANDFILL RESEARCH AREA (LFRA). The area formerly used for landfill would be used for remediation and reuse research. The landfill polygon will realize very limited development after it is remediated.

Polygon 9a: Gross Acreage: 161, UNIVERSITY RESEARCH AREA (URA). This area has value both as a conservation area and as an important link within the habitat corridor.

Polygon 9b: Gross Acreage: 46, UNIVERSITY/SCIENCE/OFFICE (USO). Facilities will be sensitively placed in these polygons to avoid important biological resources and to provide a manageable interface between the built and the open environment.

Polygon 10a: Gross Acreage: 7, SCHOOL (SCH). This is a proposed site for an elementary school.

Polygon 11a: Gross Acreage: 174, HABITAT PRESERVATION (HAB). The parcel has valuable habitat and is critical in the corridor connection to the interior. The boundaries will be adjusted to preserve the corridor between polygons 9a and 25 through the westerly side of polygon 17b while establishing manageable boundaries with Polygons 7a, 10 and 1lb.

Polygon 11b: Gross Acreage: 734, AGRI-BUSINESS CENTER/PUBLIC SAFETY TRAINING (AGRI/POST). The proposed uses in this area include an Agri-Business Center and a Public Safety Training Facility. Approximately 200 acres of this polygon will be developed. The remainder will be set aside as open space/habitat. Boundaries will be adjusted to establish logical permanent boundaries between developable and undeveloped lands best held for habitat preservation.

Polygon 17a: Gross Acreage: 58, PARKS AND RECREATION (CPRK). Boundaries will be adjusted to accommodate significant biological resources.

Polygon 17b: Gross Acreage: 458, PARKS AND RECREATION (RV). The existing travel camp in this polygon will be rehabilitated, and minor improvements will be made to accommodate youth camp activities for 250 youths. Most of the area will be used for environmentally-oriented recreation and outdoor education to enhance the corridor connection between interior and coastal habitats to the North.

Polygon 19a: Gross Acreage: 778, LIGHT INDUSTRIAL (LI) with emphasis on light industrial uses supportive of educational objectives of the BRP. More than 320 acres, located at the ecotonal edge between maritime chaparral and oak woodland will be preserved as open space/habitat.

Polygon 19b: Gross Acreage: 91, ARMY/MOTOR POOL (Army/MP). This area is the site of an existing Army motor pool recommended for retention in the POM Annex. Alternatively, the area would be used for light industry/offices supporting CSUMB. This is also a proposed site for a multi-modal transportation center/MST transit operations facility.

Polygon 21a: Gross Acreage: 133, MEDIUM DENSITY/HIGH DENSITY RESIDENTIAL (MR). As appropriate to improve the regional jobs/housing balance.

Polygon 21b: Gross Acreage: 362, LIGHT INDUSTRIAL (LI).

Polygon 21c: Gross Acreage: 14, HABITAT PRESERVE (HAB). This 14-acre site has been requested by Monterey Peninsula College as a California Native Plant Society Plant Preserve.

Polygon 25: Gross Acreage: 15,026, NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AREA (NRMA). Public lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management would remain in federal ownership. These lands would be managed primarily to protect and enhance habitat for rare species. These lands would also be available for public recreation and open space uses that are compatible with protection of the biological habitats. It is anticipated that there would be a system of trails for hiking, equestrian, and mountain biking enthusiasts, as well as opportunities for study and interpretation of the natural environments. Other public uses that are expected to occur here include environmental education, biological research, and wildlife fire training. Some areas may also be available for future development of facilities to support public and non-profit agencies such as schools, fire and law enforcement training, parks, etc.

Management guidelines for these lands would be established by a Coordinated Resource Management Plan (CRMP) which would be developed cooperatively by the BLM, local agencies and governments and the local community.

Polygon 26: Gross Acreage: 38, LAW ENFORCEMENT TRAINING (POST). This area is to be used for law enforcement training, utilizing existing MOUT (Military Operations Urban Terrain) facility.

Polygon 30a, b, and c: Gross Acreage: 635, PARKS AND RECREATION (RAE). These are parking areas for Laguna Seca and will be sited and managed to optimize use of previously disturbed areas and minimize permanent damage to habitat. The size and location of these areas is subject to modification.

Polygon 32: Gross Acreage: 87, SCHOOL/EXPANSION (SE). York School will construct a cross country course through this polygon resulting in minimal disturbance to the maritime chaparral habitat. Final polygon boundaries are currently being refined.

Monterey County/Sand City/Marina/Seaside

West of Highway 1
Polygon 12a: Gross Acreage: 404, OPEN SPACE (CDZ). The undisturbed coastal dune zone is entirely preserved by the BRP.

Polygon 12b: Gross Acreage: 510, PARKS AND RECREATION (DHZ). Family campgrounds and day use facilities with controlled access to beach and dune habitat zone.

Polygon 14a: Gross Acreage: 57, PARKS AND RECREATION (MUA/ATF). The existing Stilwell Hall will be used as a multi-agency visitor center.

A facility and conference center may be built to house up to 80 overnight guest units, dining and support facilities and a variety of large and small meeting rooms.

Polygon 14b: Gross Acreage: 11, PARKS AND RECREATION (SA). The service area will use a previously disturbed area formerly the Ammunition Supply Point (ASP) to provide for equipment parking and storage.

Polygon 14c: Gross Acreage: 4, DESALINATION PLANT (DS). This disturbed area is the site of an old sewage treatment plant. It is a possible site for a desalination plant, utilizing piping, parking and other existing facilities not currently in use. It would be designed and sited to minimize encroachment on the coastal dune habitat and viewshed.

Monterey County/Del Rey Oaks

Polygon 29a: Gross Acreage: 270, OFFICE PARK (OP). This area is proposed for a combination of conference center, corporate headquarters, high tech business park, office park uses and commercial uses. A golf course of approximately 150-160 acres is also proposed, subject to conformity with the EIS and ROD.

Polygon 31a: Gross Acreage: 15, NATURAL AREA EXPANSION (NAE). The Natural Area Expansion polygon is designated to honor Monterey Peninsula Regional Parks District's request for an area to expand the Frog Pond on Fort Ord. The wetlands and ephemeral drainage in this area will be managed as open space/habitat.

Polygon 31b: Gross Acreage: 18, OFFICE PARK (OP). This area is proposed for a combination of conference center and hotel. The area will be developed, allowing for sensitive placement of facilities and adequate buffer with the neighboring Natural Expansion Area (NEA).

City of Seaside

Polygon 15: Gross Acreage: 147, COMMERCIAL BUSINESS (CBUS). This area is proposed for regional retail and commercial uses normally associated with a central business district.

Polygon 18: Gross Acreage: 110, OFFICE PARK (OP). This area is proposed for office use with a small amount of medium density residential. A Defense Finance and Accounting Service Office (DFAS) will be included.

Polygon 20a: Gross Acreage: 194, MEDIUM DENSITY RESIDENTIAL (MR). and 600 resort hotel rooms with a meeting space.

Polygon 20b: Gross Acreage: 97, MEDIUM DENSITY RESIDENTIAL (MR).

Polygon 20c: Gross Acreage: 313, MEDIUM DENSITY RESIDENTIAL (MR).

Polygon 20d: Gross Acreage: 35, INSTITUTIONAL/MIIS (INST). This is the proposed site for Monterey Institute of International Studies. Approximately five acres will remain undeveloped.

Polygon 20e: Gross Acreage: 85, OFFICE PARK (OP).

Polygon 20f: Gross Acreage: 50, SCHOOL (SCH). This is the site of the existing Fitch Middle School. Approximately 37 acres of the site will remain open space.

Polygon 20g: Gross Acreage: 96, HIGH DENSITY RESIDENTIAL (HR).

Polygon 20h: Gross Acreage: 779, ARMY ENCLAVE (ARMY). The POM Annex Footprint shown in the BRP reflects 1991 BRAC action and community reuse planning as of December 30, 1993. These boundaries may be modified based upon implementation of the 1993 BRAC action and Army/Community Cooperative decision making.

Polygon 20i: Gross Acreage: 16, SCHOOL (SCH). This is the site of the existing Stilwell Elementary School.

Polygon 20j: Gross Acreage: 8, SCHOOL (SCH). This is the site of the existing Marshall Elementary School.

Polygon 20k: Gross Acreage: 27, SCHOOL (SCH). This is the site of the existing Hayes Elementary School.

Polygon 22: Gross Acreage: 404, GOLF COURSES (GOLF). Two existing championship golf courses: Black Horse and Bayonet.

Polygon 23: Gross Acreage: 91, TOURISM (RH). This area is proposed for resort hotels (approximately 525 hotel rooms).

Polygon 24: Gross Acreage: 121, COMMERCIAL BUSINESS (OP). This area is proposed for office use.

Polygon 25: Gross Acreage: 1179, NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AREA (NRMA). Public lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management would remain in federal ownership.

Monterey County/City of Monterey

Polygon 29b: Gross Acreage: 92, OFFICE PARK (OP). This area is proposed for a combination corporate headquarters, high tech business park, and office park.

Polygon 29c: Gross Acreage: 30, OFFICE PARK (OP). This area is proposed for a combination of corporate headquarters, high tech business park, office park and City corporation yard uses.

Polygon 29d: Gross Acreage: 25, OFFICE PARK (OP). This area is proposed for a combination of corporate headquarters, high tech business park and office park uses.

Polygon 29e: Gross Acreage: 20, COMMUNITY PARK (CPRK). This area is proposed for overnight camping and hiking. This area may be used as Highway 68 alternative corridor. If the area is used for highway purposes, the California Department of Transportation will provide the City of Monterey a community park site at another location.


Appendix B:

ATSDR Public Health Hazard Conclusion Categories
Category Definition Criteria
A. Urgent public health hazard This category is used for sites that pose an urgent public health hazard as the result of short-term exposures to hazardous substances.
  • evidence exists that exposures have occurred, are occurring, or are likely to occur in the future AND
  • estimated exposures are to a substance(s) at concentrations in the environment that, upon short-term exposures, can cause adverse health effects to any segment of the receptor population AND/OR
  • community-specific health outcome data indicate that the site has had an adverse impact on human health that requires rapid intervention AND/OR
  • physical hazards at the site pose an imminent risk of physical injury
  • B. Public health hazard This category is used for sites that pose a public health hazard as the result of long-term exposures to hazardous substances.
  • evidence exists that exposures have occurred, are occurring, or are likely to occur in the future AND
  • estimated exposures are to a substance(s) at concentrations in the environment that, upon long-term exposures, can cause adverse health effects to any segment of the receptor population AND/OR
  • community-specific health outcome data indicate that the site has had an adverse impact on human health that requires intervention
  • C. Indeterminate public health hazard This category is used for sites with incomplete information.
  • limited available data do not indicate that humans are being or have been exposed to levels of contamination that would be expected to cause adverse health effects; data or information are not available for all environmental media to which humans may be exposed AND
  • there are insufficient or no community-specific health outcome data to indicate that the site has had an adverse impact on human health
  • D. No apparent public health hazard This category is used for sites where human exposure to contaminated media is occurring or has occurred in the past, but the exposure is below a level of health hazard.
  • exposures do not exceed an ATSDR chronic MRL or other comparable value AND
  • data are available for all environmental media to which humans are being exposed AND
  • there are no community-specific health outcome data to indicate that the site has had an adverse impact on human health
  • E. No public health hazard This category is used for sites that do not pose a public health hazard.
  • no evidence of current or past human exposure to contaminated media AND
  • future exposures to contaminated media are not likely to occur AND
  • there are no community-specific health outcome data to indicate that the site has had an adverse impact on human health
  • APPENDIX C: PUBLIC COMMENTS ON THE FORT ORD PUBLIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT

    The Fort Ord Public Health Assessment was released for public comment on July 15, 1996. The comment period ended on September 5, 1996.

    Comments were received from the U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Presidio of Monterey, and the California Department of Health. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency had no written comments on the assessment.

    The specific comments that were received either identified new information; questioned specific sentences or paragraphs in the text or tables; or suggested additions or corrections to improve the clarity, completeness, or accuracy of a specific sentence or paragraph. Those specific comments were not repeated by other respondents and are listed separately. This list of specific comments does not include editorial comments concerning word spelling, sentence syntax, format, etc. If the accuracy of a statement was questioned, the statement was verified and corrected. Comments which requested that information be added to the document without providing documented sources of that information were not addressed here.

    SPECIFIC COMMENTS

    1. Table 5 expresses 6 carbon tetrachloride detections above the U.S. EPA MCL of 5 ppb; furthermore, it footnotes the state of California's state MCL of 0.5 ppb. It was suggested that Table 5 express how many of the 33 carbon tetrachloride detections were above the state of California 0.5 ppb MCL.

    Reply

    The minimum level of detection was 0.5 ppb for carbon tetrachloride, therefore all 33 detections of carbon tetrachloride were above the state of California 0.5 ppb MCL.

    2. Page 23 - The lead and bullet fragments in the "heavy" surface areas in the Beach Ranges will be removed to below 1,860 ppm, not no detect.

    Reply

    New information has been provided to ATSDR on the clean-up lead levels in the Beach Ranges. The "heavy" areas will not be cleaned up to levels of no detect, but rather to a level below 1,860 ppm. The U.S. EPA used the Integrated Uptake BioKinetic Model to determine that a lead concentration of 1,860 ppm would not result in child blood-lead levels over 10 ug/dL. A pilot study of 1,000 cubic yards removed lead through visual and mechanical methods to an average level of 5.6 ppm. The excavation of the remaining "heavy" areas is believed to result in similar clean-up levels.

    3. Page 22 - There is no evidence indicating that large caliber ordnance was fired into Monterey Bay nor is there any evidence indicating that Fort Ord is responsible for any UXO in Monterey Bay.

    Reply

    The Enhanced Preliminary Assessment of Monterey Bay reviewed by ATSDR suggests that large caliber ordnance may have been fired into Monterey Bay. However, there is no documentation confirming that Fort Ord is responsible for any UXO in Monterey Bay. The discussion about this is found on page 22.

    4. Page 27 - A boundary fence will only be constructed around the Multi-Range Area, but not around the other Ordnance and Explosives (OE) sites.

    Reply

    New information has been provided to ATSDR stating that the boundary fence will only be maintained around Site 15 (Multi-Range Area) and no fencing will be placed around all of the OE sites. The PHA text has been changed accordingly. Warning signs will be placed and maintained around all of the OE sites. The remaining OE sites do not pose a threat to human health because those OE sites are either undergoing Time Critical Removal Actions or further investigations.

    5. Page 19 - OE Time Critical Removal Actions (TCRAs) have not been completed for all areas shown in Figure 6. Some TCRAs have been completed and some are on-going.

    Reply

    A current OE program status map has been provided to ATSDR and has been added to the PHA.


    1. The state of California has adopted a MCL of 0.5 ppb for carbon tetrachloride.

    2. The "worst- or maximum-case" assumptions are that drinking water at the maximum contaminant level ever detected in the individual drinking water well listed is ingested for an exposure duration period beginning with the opening date of the Fort Ord landfills (1956) or the year the well was drilled, if later than 1956, and continuing until the well is closed or destroyed. It is further assumed that the maximum detected groundwater contaminant levels is maintained continuously from the year the landfill was opened and that the water is not blended with water from other wells with little or no contamination.

    3. The "possible-case" assumptions include the "worst-case" assumption that the maximum detected level of groundwater contamination is maintained throughout the duration of the exposure, but the possible exposure duration is based upon the first detection of VOC contaminants in groundwater in 1985 and the status of the listed well at that time (eg. closed, standby, active, destroyed) and the date of the action(s) affecting the well status.

    4. The worst- or maximum-case" assumptions are that drinking water at the maximum level of contamination ever detected in the listed well is ingested for a lifetime (70-years) and that the water ingested is from the individual well rather than finished tap water resulting from blending with water from other wells with no or little contamination. The estimated dose values that are greater than the RfD or the ATSDR Intermediate MRL value can be interpreted as representing a possibly increased non-cancer human health risk.

    5. EPA Region 3 RfD. No nationwide RfD exists for TCE at this time.

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