Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to site content

PUBLIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT

TYNDALL AIR FORCE BASE
PANAMA CITY, BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA


APPENDICES

FIGURES

1. Site Map
1. Site Map

2. Tyndall AFB after removal of 25 homes with the boundary of the Wherry Landfill
2. Tyndall AFB after removal of 25 homes with the boundary of the Wherry Landfill

3. Tyndall AFB before removal of 25 homes
3. Tyndall AFB before removal of 25 homes


APPENDIX A.

LIST OF INSTALLATION RESTORATION PROGRAM SITES AND SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT UNITS
Phase I Site Number1/
Subsequent ID Number3
SWMU/
AOC Number
Phase IIZoneNumber2IRP Site NameSite History and Other Information
11 Wherry LandfillFrom 1943 to 1948, this site was used for general refuse and mess hall wastes. Noknown hazardous waste was disposed of here. The Wherry II Family Housing complexwas constructed on site in 1951 and 25 houses were removed in the 1970s due tosettlement and cracking of house foundations.1,5 TAFB will be conducting long-termgroundwater monitoring at this site.6
22 Sabre Drive LandfillFrom 1943 to 1965, this site was used for disposal of general refuse.5 TAFB will beconducting long-term groundwater monitoring.6
33 Beacon Beach RoadLandfillFrom 1952 to 1965, this site was used for general refuse with no known hazardous wastedisposed of here.1, 6 TAFB is conducting long-term groundwater monitoring. 6
4/
OT-4
47Southeast RunwayExtension Burial SiteFrom 1945 to 1965, this site was used for disposal of used containers, drums, oldbatteries, and old parts.1
5/
LF-5
586000 Area LandfillFrom 1945 to 1965, this 3-acres site was used for disposal of old parts, batteries, andempty containers.1
661Sewage Plant VicinityLandfill From 1965 to 1973, this site was used for disposal of containers of waste oils and solvents, wrecked drones, and asbestos encased in concrete. Waste may have included methyl ethyl ketone, paint wastes, trichloroethene, chromic acid, cresylic acid, o-dichlorobenzene, and phenolic wastes.1
771Spray Field VicinityLandfillFrom 1973 to 1977, this site was used for disposal of mostly household trash. Some ofthe same types of industrial and hazardous waste as IRP 6 was also disposed of here.1 An earthen cap of 3.5 feet has been placed on this landfill.
88 Golf Course TrashDisposal SiteFrom 1962 to present, this site has been used for yard wastes.
99 Capehart Burial SiteThis site use used for disposal of the debris from 40 homes demolished in a 1962 hurricane.
1010 Capehart Marina RubbleStorageFrom 1975 to present, this site is used for storage of rubble.
1111 Boy Scout Road YardTrash Disposal AreaFrom 1980 to present, this site is used for disposal of tree limbs and yard waste.
1212 Highway 98 Burial SiteThis site was used in the mid-1960s for burial of rubble and debris from the razing ofTyndall Air Force Base housing including the Magnolia housing area.
13SWMU 13A BurnPit, 13B Burial Pits,29W EOD, andWaste AccumulationArea. Explosive OrdnanceDisposal (EOD) BurialSiteThis site was used from 1950s to present for disposal of residue from incineration ordetonation of unused ordnance.1 Explosives were detonated using diesel fuel at this siteand the residue was disposed of in pits. This area is currently used for training exercisesthat use explosives. Debris is now put into drums for disposal elsewhere. Area isfenced. Disposal into the pits ended in 1984.5
14/
SS-14
143Petroleum, Oils, andLubricates (AOL) Area"A"This site is no longer used but was used from 1943 to an unknown date. This site wasused in the past for disposal of tank sludge. Prior to 1974, the sludge disposed of herewas from the storage of leaded aviation fuels (AVGAS).1
15 15A POL Area B Sludge Trenches,
15B Bldg 509, and Former IRP Drum Holding Pad
9POL Area "B"This site was used from 1943 to 1987 for the disposal of sludges from storage tanks usedto store JP-4, No. 2 diesel fuel, automobile fuel (MOGAS) and leaded AVGAS.
16/

FT-16

16A Fire Training Pit,
16B Orig. POL Tanks (USTs), and
16C New POL Holding Tanks
10Shell Bank fire trainingarea.This site was used from 1943 to 1952 and from 1968 to 1980 for fire training. Fireswere deliberately set by igniting POL waste after it was poured onto old aircraft. Thissite may also have received POL waste directly from a tank. Prior to 1971, a proteinfoam was used to put out the fires during the training. Since 1971, aqueous film-formingfoams have been used to douse the fire. These foams consisted of fluorocarbonsurfactants with a petroleum base.

16B: two 20,000-gallon USTs removed in 1952.

16C: two 20,000-gallon tanks (aboveground?) was moved here from site 17A in 1968and used till 1980. 16B and C stored diesel fuel, MOGAS, and leaded AVGAS.

17/

FT-17

17A Fire Training Area,
17B Highway 98 Fire Training Area, Former PCB Transformer Site5, and 17C Drum Burial Site5, 15
6Highway 98 fire trainingarea.17A: This site was used from 1952 to 1968. This site was operated similar to Site 16 butused fuels stored in two 20,000-USTs. Containers of fuel were also emptied into thebermed area. Empty drums were seen near this site in 1968.

17B: This site is located east of 17A and was used to store PCB transformers removedfrom service. The transformers were stored in unlined areas on pallets.

17C. See site number 27.

18/
OT-18
2Lynn Haven DefenseFuels Supply PointThis site was used from 1943 to an unknown date for the storage and dispensing of bulkfuels. This site is no longer used. Bunker C fuel may have been dumped outside of thewest gate in early 1950s. This site was also used to steam clean drums and the washwater was dumped on the ground behind the drum loading station.1

Six oil/water separators were used to treat stormwater and the effluent drained into NorthBay.

18 2Sludge disposal areasSince the 1950s, AVGAS, JP-4, and JP-5 have been stored at a tank farm at thislocation. Prior to 1969, tank sludges were buried within the diked areas. Sludges mayhave been removed during regrading and resurfacing.2
18/
OT-18
2Underdrain fieldMinor spills have occurred at the truck loading and railcar loading areas. An underdrainfield was installed in 1980 beneath the railcar area. This field discharges to a series ofoil/water separators. Bunker C fuel has been collected in the separators.2
A/
19
184AAFES Service StationFormer UST AreaFuel tanks were installed in 1948 and found to be leaking in 1983. These tanks werereplaced in 1988.5 This site is also known as Bldg 968 leaking underground storagetank.
/SS-20 19 POL Area C3, also knownas the Former Facility 550Waste PetroleumProducts Storage Tanks5 This site was used from the 1970s to 1989 and consists of four 12,000-gallon USTsstoring waste petroleum products.5
/OT-21 Explosive Ordnance andDisposal (EOD) Range3Consists of the burn pit and four waste disposal cells located south of the access road.9
/OT-22 20 Pesticide Disposal Area3Suspected disposal of pesticide adjacent to building 8702. TAFB has prepared nodecision document for this site. The RFA reports that the groundwater was notcontaminated from this site.5
/OT-23 21 Former Active FireTraining Area3From 1981 to 1992, this area was used to simulate aircraft and fuel spill fires. The unitis reportedly equipped with a concrete liner. Drainage from the unit was gravity fed toan oil/water separator. Waste fuels were stored in a 10000-gallon aboveground tank. Fires were extinguished using a fluorocarbon surfactant with a petroleum base.

In 1992, underground piping from the tank the to fire pit released 275 gallons of fuel,resulting in contamination on the northeast side of the pit near the tank.5

/OT-24 22 9700 Batch Asphalt Plant3 From 1978 to 1988, small batches of asphalt of varying composition were produced here.5
B/
OT-25
23A Burial Pit

23B UST HoldingArea

5Small Arms Repair AreaFrom 1965 to 1972, waste paints and solvents were disposed of in these pits.2
/2624A-M and AOC G.4?Vehicle MaintenanceAreaIncludes 2 underground waste oil storage tanks, 5 oil/water separators, a vehiclewashrack, a hazardous waste holding shed, a paint booth, and floor trenches at threevehicle maintenance areas with associated sumps. These areas have been used from the1950s to present.5

This site is actively used as a vehicle maintenance facility (Buildings 561 and 560), amachine shop (Building 560), a paint shop (Building 449), a car wash (Building 571),and a gasoline dispensing facility (Structure 562).5

/27 300 Drum Burial AreaThis area was used to store transformers on wooden pallets. Transformer liquids havebeen spilled here. This area may also have been a drum burial site.
/28 Crooked Island4Consists of two separate areas: a 10-acre area where explosives may have been detonatedor disposed of and a 160-acre area that may have been contaminated by radioactivematerial. Some areas on Crooked Island have been used for "live fire" gunnery rangesfor military pilots.14
/2925 Shoal Point Bayou4
30 Carrabelle MissileTacking Annex.Used from 1959 to present as an antenna site. No hazardous waste handled. Located offthe base.
31 St. George Island ACMITowerUsed from 1979 to present as an antenna receiving station. Located off the base.
32 Apalachicola Radio RelayAnnexUsed from 1959 to present as a relay station. Located off the base.
34 Cove Gardens MilitaryFamily Housing SatelliteUsed from 1942 to present as a housing area with 130 units. No known hazardous wastehandled or disposed of here. Located off the base.
35 Bay County WastewaterTreatment Lagoon32-million gallon per day aerated lagoon treatment facility located off the base. Thisfacility began treatment of Southwest Forest Products papermill waste in August 1974; itwas redesignated as a regional treatment plant with TAFB sending wastewater there in1984.

Sludge from the lagoon bottom was dredged in 1980 for dewatering, with sludgesupernatant sent back to the wastewater treatment plant, and sludge disposition may havebeen sent off the site.

3626 26A Unauthorized DrumBurial Pits

26B "6000" AreaConstruction DebrisLandfill

26A consists of 2 unlined pits containing buried drums and tanks. It was excavated inNovember 1991. TAFB entered into a compliance agreement with the state for a RCRAclosure permit. Contaminants included volatile organic carbons and PAHs.5

26B received construction rubble from the demolition of an old runway.5

AOC 1 Sky X Research FacilityLocated on-base, approximately 7 miles from the main gate of TAFB. Consists of twoareas: one area is a topographically lower east area that includes second and thirdgeneration aircraft shelters and two "TAB-VEE" shelters. The second generation shelteris used for small scale fire research. The third generation shelter is used forantipenetration and reactive structure systems.

The second area consists of the Sky X facility and has been used for small scale fireresearch, shelter survivability and vulnerability testing, and rapid runaway repair testingsince 1975.

A NATO facility and "HYPAR" structure are located nearby.6

AOC 2 Combat Support AgencyUSTContamination assessment to be conducted.
27 Waste Oil BowsersThis is an area where mobile 250-gallon storage units for used oil were stored.
28A -28GG Oil/Water SeparatorsThese separators are located throughout the base. The collected oil is discharged to thewaste oil storage tanks. Separated water goes to the wastewater treatment plant. 5
29A-Z Waste AccumulationAreas
30 Sanitary Sewer System
31 Wastewater TreatmentPlantFrom 1943 to 1999. Consisted of 2 trickling filters, 2 settling chambers, 2 chlorinecontact chambers, 2 sludge digester tanks, and 4 sludge drying beds all constructed ofconcrete. Liquid effluent went to the Bay County publicly owned treatment plant. Sludge was trucked off for off-site disposal in a landfill. Prior to 1975, liquid effluentwas discharged to Gulf of Mexico. From 1975 to 1984, treated effluent was applied tothe Spray Irrigation Field (SWMU 33).5
32 Wastewater holding pondFrom 1975 to 1984, this unit received treated effluent from the SWMU 30 for storageprior to being applied to the Spray Irrigation Field (SWMU 33).5
33 Spray Irrigation Field(SWMU 33)This 83-acre field was used from 1975 to 1984 to receive treated effluent from thewastewater holding pond. Use of this field ceased due to ponding problems.5
34 Stormwater DrainageDitchesThese ditches are unlined units located throughout base. The discharges from fourditches are regulated under the EPA National Permit Discharge Elimination System(NPDES). These permitted discharges are in the Fred Bayou area, munitions storagearea, and two in the flightline area. These ditches managed potentially contaminatedstormwater runoff.

Two stormwater ditches run along the western and eastern side of the Spray FieldVicinity Landfill (SWMU 7) and empty into the Gulf of Mexico.5 These ditches mayhave received leachate containing waste oils and solvents from this landfill.

35 Former Building 158AreaFrom 1941 to 1993, this area was used for washing of airplanes. No evidence of arelease was identified in file material or observed, but the RFA requested moreinformation since the wastewater may have included paint removers, alkaline cleaningsolutions, paint, grease and a substance called PD680.5
36 Building 83
Washrack
The building contained a sloping concrete floor that collected wash water andnonhazardous detergent. The water flowed to an oil/water separator (SWMU 28A).
37 New Engine Test CellPadThis test cell produced oil and grease drippings that fell to a concrete pad. Floorwashings from the pad drained to an oil/water separator (SWMU 28S).
38 Building 264 "AGE"Wash PadThis wash pad slopes to a drain. The pad was heavily stained and cracked. The padmanaged oil and grease.5
39 Building 264 "AGE"Maintenance PadThis maintenance work area included a floor washing water drain that was connected toan oil/water separator (SWMU 28D).5
40 Building 315 Paint ShopArea TrenchesFloor washwater from this building's trenches drained to an oil/water separator (SWMU28F).5
41 Building 316 Fuel CellMaintenance TrenchFloor washwater from this building's trenches drained to an oil/water separator (SWMU28G).5
42 Building 325 Engine TestCell Test Pad FloorDrainsFloor washwater from this building's trenches drained to an oil/water separator (SWMU28H).5
43 Building 522 Spent LeadAcid Battery DrainingSystemThis system included racks where lead acid batteries were drained. The racks wereunderlain by a ceramic tile floor. The drains flowed into a limestone-filled pit beneaththe floor. The pit drained to the sanitary sewer.5
44 Building 934 Auto HobbyShop Waste Oil StorageTankPossible release of waste oil.5
45 Building 934 Auto HobbyShop Waste OilCollection DrumsDrums collecting waste oil for transfer to SWMU 44.5
46 6000 Area Shop WasteTanksThree horizontal tanks within a diked area used to store waste oil.5
47 Building 6011 DrumReceiving AreaTemporary storage of drums from the Waste Accumulation Areas (SWMUs 29A-W) forweighing and waste determinations.5
48 Building 6011 WasteStorage ShedRCRA "less than 90 storage area" for hazardous waste.5
49 Building 9017 VehicleMaintenance Wash PadWater from truck washing drained to an oil/water separator (SWMU 28Y).5
50 Fuels Management AreaWaste Oil UST30,000-gallon steel UST receiving waste water overflow from the fuels management areaOil/Water Separator A (SWMU 28P). This unit discharged to the wastewater treatmentplant. Prior to this use, the UST was used for fuel oil storage.5
51 Former RCRA ContainerStorage AreaThe Florida Department of Environmental Protection Unit confirmed this area as cleanclosed under RCRA regulations. Sampling from the closure operations detected traceamounts of methyl ethyl ketone (0.33ppm).5
52 Former CapehartWastewater TreatmentPlant Site.This plant treated sanitary wastewater from the Capehart Base Housing Developmentuntil Capehart was shut down in 1975. Effluent from the plant was discharged to Gulfof Mexico. The plant was razed in 1993, and the site is now a park.5
53 Former Building 239Engine Test Cell WasteOil Storage TankThis 1,000-gallon UST stored oil and grease from SWMU 28B (engine test cell oil/waterseparator) and was taken out of service in 1992. The RFA recommended an integritycheck.5 TAFB conducted some work on this unit as part of Site Number 4 with soilboring and monitoring wells.6
54 Former Building 240Engine Test Cell StorageTankThis 2,000-gallon UST stored oil and grease from the 240 Engine Test Cell. It wasremoved in 1991. Base personnel reported during the RCRA RFA visual site inspectionthat there was known soil contamination in this building area.5 TAFB has investigatedthis tank with soil borings and monitoring wells.6
55 Building 451 Former PCBTransformer Storage AreaThis area stored out-of-service transformers that contained PCBs. The RFA did not findany evidence of releases.5
56 Building 530 FormerEmpty Drum HoldingAreaThis area held empty drums after they were triple rinsed. The drums were used to storetrichloroethene. The RFA did not find any evidence of releases.5
57 Building 3002 FormerPCB Transformer StorageAreaThis area stored out-of-service transformers that contained PCBs. The RFA did not findany evidence of releases.5
58 Former Medical WasteIncineratorThis incinerator was located at the base hospital and operated under a FloridaDepartment of Environmental Protection permit. The incinerator failed secondarycombustion testing for residence time and shut down.5
A Building 182 Former USTSiteThis 1000-gallon UST stored JP-4 and was removed in 1991. Contaminated soil wasremoved when the tank was removed. Groundwater was sampled during excavation andfound to contain benzene (210 g/L), total VOCs (1760 g/L), and PAHs (2145 g/L). The benzene concentrations exceeded Florida's maximum contaminant levels fordrinking water of 1 g/L.5 TAFB conducted investigations with soil borings and wells.6
B Building 214 Diesel USTThis 1000-gallon UST stored diesel fuel. According to Contamination AssessmentReport dated January 1993, groundwater contamination occurred due to overflow fromthe fill pipe.5 Soil borings and wells were installed at this unit.6
C Building 239 Former10,000 Gallon Jet FuelUSTThis UST stored JP-4 and was removed in 1991. Groundwater samples taken duringexcavation found benzene (2 g/L), total VOCs (67 g/L), and PAHs (197 g/L).5 TAFB is investigating this area with soil borings and wells.6
D Building 239 Former5,000 Gallon Jet FuelUSTThis UST stored JP-4 and was removed in 1991. Groundwater samples taken duringexcavation found 130 g/L, total VOCs (583 g/L), and PAHs (266 g/L). This USTwas to be investigated with Contamination Assessment Report.6
E Building 242 FormerWaste Oil TankThis UST of unknown size was removed in 1991. Groundwater samples taken duringexcavation found benzene (130 g/L), cadmium (42 g/L), chromium (100 g/L), andlead (790 g/L).5 TAFB investigated this tank with soil borings and wells and classifiedthis tank as "no further action." The Florida Department of Environmental Protectionconcurred with this classification.6
F Building 550 Groundwater Plume
(IRP Site 26).
This site is a groundwater plume from the Vehicle Maintenance Area (IRP Site 26(SWMU 24) which flows toward Bldg 550. Groundwater contamination includes totalpetroleum hydrocarbons, metals, and semivolatile organics.5 Tyndall AFB will beinvestigating this SWMU.6
G Building 560 ProductUSTsThis site consists of two 10,000-gallon USTs that stored diesel fuel and MOGAS. Thesetanks were investigated with IRP Site 24 (SWMU 24).5 The investigation includes soilborings and wells.6
H Building 722 FormerGasoline USTThis site consists of one 55-gallon UST that stored gasoline. The UST was removed in1991. Groundwater samples taken during excavation found benzene (6000g/L) and total VOCs (69,000 g/L).5 This site was investigated with soil borings and wells.6
I Building 1282 DieselUSTThis 1000-gallon UST stored diesel fuel.5 This site was investigated with soil boringsand wells.6
J Building 2706 productStorage TankThis 5000-gallon aboveground storage tank stored MOGAS. Approximately 400 gallonsof MOGAS was accidentally released from underground piping associated with this unitabout 140 feet southwest of the tank about 150 feet from St. Andrew Bay.5 This site wasinvestigated with soil borings and wells.6
K Building 7022 DieselFuel SpillThis site consists of an area that received a diesel fuel spill. Run off would have flowedtoward Lake Ammo approximately 50 feet away. Soil was excavated by TAFBconfirmation sampling was not conducted.5 This site was investigated with soil boringsand wells.6
40701583No information available.
References
1 CH2M Hill 1981
2 Water and Air Research 1984
3 Geraghty & Miller 1991
4 Rust Environment and Infrastructure 1993b
5. A.T. Kearney 1994
6. Baughman 1995
7. Sirrine Environmental Consultants 1992
8. Wilkinson 1995


APPENDIX B

PUBLIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT CONCLUSION CATEGORIES

CATEGORY A : URGENT PUBLIC HEALTH HAZARD

This category is used for sites where short-term exposures (< 1 yr) to hazardous substances or conditionscould result in adverse health effects that require rapid intervention.

This determination represents a professional judgement based on critical data which ATSDR has judged sufficientto support a decision. This does not necessarily imply that the available data are complete; in some cases additionaldata may be required to confirm or further support the decision made.

Criteria:

Evaluation of available relevant information* indicates that site-specific conditions or likely exposures have had, arehaving, or are likely to have in the future, an adverse impact on human health that requires immediate action orintervention. Such site-specific conditions or exposures may include the presence of serious physical or safetyhazards, such as open mine shafts, poorly stored or maintained flammable/explosive substances, or medical deviceswhich, upon rupture, could release radioactive materials.

* Such as environmental and demographic data; health outcome data; exposure data; community healthconcerns information; toxicologic, medical, and epidemiologic data.

ATSDR Actions:


ATSDR will expeditiously issue a health advisory that includes recommendations to mitigate the health risks posedby the site. The recommendations issued in the health advisory and/or health assessment should be consistent withthe degree of hazard and temporal concerns posed by exposures to hazardous substances at the site.

Based on the degree of hazard posed by the site and the presence of sufficiently defined current, past, or futurecompleted exposure pathways, one or more of the following public health actions can be recommended:

  • biologic indicators of exposure study
  • biomedical testing
  • case study
  • disease and symptom prevalence study
  • community health investigations
  • registries
  • site-specific surveillance
  • voluntary residents tracking system
  • cluster investigation
  • health statistics review
  • health professional education
  • community health education
  • substance-specific applied research

CATEGORY B: PUBLIC HEALTH HAZARD

This category is used for sites that pose a public health hazard due to the existence of long-term exposures(> 1 yr) to hazardous substance or conditions that could result in adverse health effects.

This determination represents a professional judgement based on critical data which ATSDR has judged sufficientto support a decision. This does not necessarily imply that the available data are complete; in some cases additionaldata may be required to confirm or further support the decision made.

Criteria:

Evaluation of available relevant information* suggests that, under site-specific conditions of exposure, long-term exposures to site-specific contaminants (including radionuclides) have had, are having, or are likely to have in the future, an adverse impact on human health that requires one or more public health interventions. Such site-specific exposures may include the presence of serious physical hazards, such as open mine shafts, poorly stored or maintained flammable/ explosive substances, or medical devices which, upon rupture, could release radioactive materials.

*Such as environmental and demographic data; health outcome data; exposure data; community healthconcerns information; toxicologic, medical, and epidemiologic data.

ATSDR Actions:


ATSDR will make recommendations in the health assessment to mitigate the health risks posed by the site. Therecommendations issued in the health assessment should be consistent with the degree of hazard and temporalconcerns posed by exposures to hazardous substances at the site. Actions on the recommendations may haveoccurred before the actual completion of the public health assessment.

Based on the degree of hazard posed by the site and the presence of sufficiently defined current, past, or futurecompleted exposure pathways, one or more of the following public health actions can be recommended:

  • biologic indicators of exposure study
  • biomedical testing
  • case study
  • disease and symptom prevalence study
  • community health investigations
  • registries
  • site-specific surveillance
  • voluntary residents tracking system
  • cluster investigation
  • health statistics review
  • health professional education
  • community health education
  • substance-specific applied research

CATEGORY C: INDETERMINATE PUBLIC HEALTH HAZARD

This category is used for sites when a professional judgement on the level of a health hazard cannot be made because information critical to such a decision is lacking.

Criteria:

This category is used for sites in which "critical" data are insufficient with regard to extent of exposure and/or toxicologic properties at estimated exposure levels. The health assessor must determine, using professional judgement, the "criticality" of such data and the likelihood that the data can be obtained and will be obtained in a timely manner. Where some data are available, even limited data, the health assessor is encouraged to the extent possible to select other hazard categories and to support their decision with clear narrative that explains the limits of the data and the rationale for the decision.

ATSDR Actions:


ATSDR will make recommendations in the health assessment to identify the data or information needed to adequately assess the public health risks posed by the site.

Public health actions recommended in this category will depend on the hazard potential of the site, specifically as it relates to the potential for human exposure of public health concern. Actions on the recommendations may have occurred before the actual completion of the public health assessment.

If the potential for exposure is high, initial health actions aimed at determining the population with the greatest risk of exposure can be recommended. Such health actions include:

  • community health investigation
  • health statistics review
  • cluster investigation
  • symptom and disease prevalence study

If the population of concern can be determined through these or other actions, any of the remaining follow-up health activities listed under categories A and B may be recommended.

In addition, if data become available suggesting that human exposure to hazardous substances at levels of public health concern is occurring or has occurred in the past, ATSDR will reevaluate the need for any followup.

CATEGORY D: NO APPARENT PUBLIC HEALTH HAZARD

This category is used for sites where human exposure to contaminated media may be occurring, may have occurred in the past, and/or may occur in the future, but the exposure is not expected to cause any adverse health effects.

This determination represents a professional judgement based on critical data which ATSDR considers sufficient to support a decision. This does not necessarily imply that the available data are complete, in some cases additional data may be required to confirm or further support the decision made.

Criteria:

Evaluation of available relevant information* indicates that, under site-specific conditions of exposure, exposures to site-specific contaminants in the past, present, or future are not likely to result in any adverse impact on human health.

*Such as environmental and demographic data; health outcome data; exposure data; community health concerns information; toxicologic, medical, and epidemiologic data; monitoring and management plans.

ATSDR Actions:


If appropriate, ATSDR will make recommendations for monitoring or other removal and/or remedial actions needed to ensure that humans are not exposed to significant concentrations of hazardous substances in the future. Actions on the recommendations may have occurred before the actual completion of the public health assessment.

The following health actions, which may be recommended in this category, are based on information indicating that no human exposure is occurring or has occurred in the past to hazardous substances at levels of public health concern. One or more of the following health actions are recommended for sites in this category:

  • community health education
  • health professional education
  • community health investigation
  • voluntary residents tracking system

However, if data become available suggesting that human exposure to hazardous substances at levels of public health concern is occurring, or has occurred in the past, ATSDR will reevaluate the need for any followup.

CATEGORY E: NO PUBLIC HEALTH HAZARD

This category is used for sites that, because of the absence of exposure, do NOT pose a public health hazard.

Criteria:

Sufficient evidence indicates that no human exposures to contaminated media have occurred, none are now occurring, and none are likely to occur in the future.

ATSDR Actions:


No public health actions are recommended at this time because no human exposure is occurring, has occurred in the past, or is likely to occur in the future that may be of public health concern.


APPENDIX C.

FRED BAYOU DDT, DDD, DDE AND WATER AND SEDIMENT
Sampling Event Sediment
(g/kg) dry weight
Surface Water
(g/L)
Comments
Collected October 1985 (dry weight) Not sampled Also analyzed for PAHs, PCBs, and metals.
(FWS 1990)
2,4'- and 4,4'-DDD1730 (mean)
2,4'- and 4,4'-DDE380 (mean)
2,4'- and 4,4'-DDT4600 (mean)
Collected July 1990
(dry weight)
28 samples includingwetland branch andupgradient drainageditches, (4,4' isomeronly)Not sampled Analyzed only for DDT, DDD, and DDE.
(FWS 1990)
4,4'-DDD<120 to 2400
4,4'-DDE<120 to 790
4,4'-DDT<120 to 2300
Collected June 19927 samples4 samples Analyzed only for DDT, DDD, and DDE.
(RUST 1993a)
4,4'-DDD< 26 to 2600J*<0.1
4,4'-DDE< 26 to 1100J*<0.1
4,4'-DDT< 26 to 12000*<0.1
Collected March 19959 samplesNot sampled Analyzed for DDT, DDD, and DDE only.
(Rust 1996)
2,4'- and 4,4'-DDD<0.1 to 850
2,4' and 4,4'-DDE<0.1 to < 790
2,4'- and 4,4'-DDT<0.1 to 5600
Collected October 199613 samples8 samples Analyzed for volatile, semivolatiles, metals, mercury, pesticides and PCBs
(Rust 1996)
2,4'- and 4,4'-DDD<21 to 660<0.1
2,4'- and 4,4'-DDE< 4.6 to <580 to 23<0.1
2,4'- and 4,4'-DDT< 4.6 to 3000<0.1
Other organics detected
Benzo(b)fluoranthene
Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate
Choromethane
Pyrene
Toluene
<400 to 790
<400 to 1000
<12 to 15
<400 to 100
< 6.1 to < 17
<1 to 1.4
Collected June 199710 samplesNot sampled Analyzed for volatiles, semivolatiles, metals, mercury, pesticides, and PCBs
(Rust 1998)
DDD< 10 to 570
DDE< 3.3 to 170
DDT< 3.3 to 2800

J represents an estimated value.
* Surrogate recovery outside of limits due to sample matrix interference but the method blankand data control spike both performed satisfactorily indicating that the data is valid.


APPENDIX D. SUMMARY OF FISH ANALYSIS1

Lab Sample ID(s) Sample Date Species Sample Type Other Compounds Analyzed for Results of Other Compounds Detected 2,4'-DDT (g/kg) 2,4'-DDD (g/kg) 2,4'-DDE (g/kg) 4,4'-DDT (g/kg) 4,4'-DDD (g/kg) 4,4'-DDE (g/kg) 2,4'- and 4,4'-DDT (g/kg) 2,4'- and 4,4'- DDD (g/kg) 2,4'- and 4,4'-DDE (g/kg)
29B-FL1 Oct 94 Gulf Flounder fillet <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 16 8.2
F29B-FL1/
duplicate
Oct 94 duplicate fillet <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 4.4 45 31
29B-FL2 Oct 94 Gulf Flounder fillet <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 <3.4 39 29
29B-FL3 Oct 94 Gulf Flounder fillet <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 5.1 32 28
29B-FL4 Oct 94 Gulf Flounder fillet <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 13 16
29B-FL5 Oct 94 Gulf Flounder fillet <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 13 11
F97-A Jun 97 Gulf Flounder fillet Full Pesticide and PCBs2 ND3 <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 3.7
F97-B Jun 97 Gulf Flounder fillet Full Pesticide and PCBs ND <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 3.8 <3.3
29B-HC1 Oct 94 Hogchoker composite <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 54 45
29B-HC2 Oct 94 Hogchoker composite <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 37 19
29B-HC3 Oct 94 Hogchoker composite <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 32 18
29B-HC4 Oct 94 Hogchoker composite <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 42 27
29B-HC5 Oct 94 Hogchoker composite <6.6 <6.6 <6.6 <6.6 74 46
BD-A Mar 95 Black Drum fillet                 <45 <45 <45
BD-B Mar 95 Black Drum fillet                 <43 <43 <43
BD97-A Jun 97 Black Drum fillet Full Pesticide and PCBs ND <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 <3.3      
BD97-B Jun 97 Black Drum fillet Full Pesticide and PCBs ND <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 4.9 <3.3      
BD97-C Jun 97 Black Drum fillet Full Pesticide and PCBs ND <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 <3.3      
BD97-D Jun 97 Black Drum fillet Full Pesticide and PCBs ND <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 4 5.8      
SF-A May 95 Southern Flounder fillet                 43 <14 33
SF-B May 95 Southern Flounder fillet                 <14 61 43
SF-C May 95 Southern Flounder fillet                 <16 96 63
SF-D May 95 Southern Flounder fillet <16 30 20
SH-A Mar 95 Sheepshead fillet                 <32 <32 56
SH-B Mar 95 Sheepshead fillet                 <40 40 57
SH97-A Jun 97 Sheepshead fillet PCBs and Pesticides ND <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 7.4 12      
SH97-B Jun 97 Sheepshead fillet PCBs and Pesticides ND <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 3.9 4.8 9.8      
SST-A May 95 Spotted Sea Trout fillet                 <16 40 65
SST-B May 95 Spotted Sea Trout fillet                 <16 <16 33
SST-C May 95 Spotted Sea Trout fillet                 <16 <16 18
SST-D May 95 Spotted Sea Trout fillet                 <16 <16 28
SST97-A Jun 97 Spotted Sea Trout fillet PCBs and Pesticides ND <6.6 <6.6 <6.6 <6.6 <6.6 12      
ST Mar 95 Sand Trout fillet                 <83 240 370
ST-A May 95 Sand Trout fillet                 <140 590 410
ST97-A Jun 97 Silver Seatrout fillet PCBs and Pesticides ND <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 <3.3 4.5      
MT-1 May 95 Pinfish composite        


Table of Contents

  
 
USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, 4770 Buford Hwy NE, Atlanta, GA 30341
Contact CDC: 800-232-4636 / TTY: 888-232-6348

A-Z Index

  1. A
  2. B
  3. C
  4. D
  5. E
  6. F
  7. G
  8. H
  9. I
  10. J
  11. K
  12. L
  13. M
  14. N
  15. O
  16. P
  17. Q
  18. R
  19. S
  20. T
  21. U
  22. V
  23. W
  24. X
  25. Y
  26. Z
  27. #