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PUBLIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT

CINNAMINSON GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION
CINNAMINSON TOWNSHIP, BURLINGTON COUNTY, NEW JERSEY


SUMMARY

Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination (CGC) site is located in Cinnaminson and Delran Townships in Burlington County, New Jersey. The CGC site is situated on approximately 400 acres and is bounded by Union Landing Road, U.S. Route 130, River Road and Taylors Lane.

CGC site consists of two inactive landfill areas, residential properties, and light to heavy industrial properties. The landfill portion of the CGC site was originally operated as a sand and gravel mining pit. After the mining operation ceased, large amounts of waste materials were landfilled at the site. Wastes included municipal wastes, vegetable and food processing wastes, industrial wastes and hazardous waste. The NJDEP ordered the landfill closed in 1980 and operations ceased. In 1981, the landfill was capped. The landfill area is not the only source of groundwater contamination. Various on-site industrial activities are believed to have caused the development of multiple plumes of area groundwater contamination. The CGC site groundwater is known to be contaminated with arsenic, manganese, and volatile organic compounds, including chloroform, benzene, tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, and vinyl chloride. The site is currently being remediated by a pump, treat, and re-injection program.

Groundwater is considered to be the only major contaminated environmental media that is potentially related to human exposure pathways at the site. Groundwater contaminants have been detected in a few private wells and three public supply wells in the vicinity of the site. However, the contaminated private wells are not being used for a source of potable water. Although it is possible that exposure did occur through non-potable use of the wells, it is unlikely that the magnitude of such exposures would be of public health concern. Moreover, any contaminated water from the downgradient public supply wells is piped to the Pomona Road station and treated with granular activated carbon to remove VOCs before being distributed. Therefore, based upon current site conditions and data available, there are no completed human exposure pathways associated with the CGC site.

Community concerns about perceived increase in cancers in their neighborhoods have been answered by the NJDHSS. Residents' concerns and fears have been addressed by performing two analyses of cancer incidence in the East Riverton section of Cinnaminson. The results of both cancer incidence analyses indicated that cancer incidence rates, and the proportional distribution of most cancer types, were similar when comparing East Riverton to the entire State.

The ATSDR and NJDHSS have determined that the CGC site represents no apparent public health hazard because of no documented exposure to site-related contaminants at levels of health concern. The results of two analyses of cancer incidence in the East Riverton section of Cinnaminson indicate that cancer rates are similar to the rest of the State. The NJDHSS will prepare a site-specific Citizen's Guide for the CGC site which will be made available to the BCHD and other interested parties.


PURPOSE AND HEALTH ISSUES

This Public Health Assessment evaluates the public health issues associated with the Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination site. Health concerns associated with the site were brought to the attention of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) by Congressional referral (letter from Senator Frank Lautenberg on December 22, 1998).

As a response to community concerns from East Riverton residents about a perceived elevated cancer rate, the ATSDR was requested to perform an evaluation of the potential health threat posed by the Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination site.

This document will comprehensively evaluate human exposure pathways associated with known contaminated environmental media within or associated with the Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination site and take action consistent with protection of the public health. At the Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination site, the contaminated medium of public health significance is groundwater.

The New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services (NJDHSS) will collaborate with environmental agencies such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) to contribute a health component to proposed and ongoing remedial activities.


BACKGROUND

A. Site Description and History

The Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination (CGC) site is a "Superfund" site located in Cinnaminson and Delran Townships in Burlington County, New Jersey (inset). "Superfund" or National Priorities List (NPL) sites represent those sites which are associated with significant public health concern in terms of the nature and magnitude of contamination present, and the potential to adversely impact the health of populations in their vicinity.

The CGC site is situated on approximately 400 acres in an area of residential and light to heavy industrial properties.(10) The site is bounded by Union Landing Road, U.S. Route 130, River Road and Taylors Lane. The Delaware River is about 5,000 feet northeast of the site (Figure 1).

The CGC site consists of an inactive landfill, residential properties, and light to heavy industrial properties. Some of the industrial facilities are known to have petroleum underground storage tanks. One industrial facility has an unlined slurry pit and cooling ponds. The landfill portion of the CGC site was originally operated as a sand and gravel mining pit. Beginning in the late 1950s, municipal solid wastes were disposed of in the completed unlined mining pits. Sand and gravel mining continued on other portions of the property until the late 1960s. After the mining operation ceased, large amounts of waste materials continued to be landfilled in two areas of the site. These wastes included: municipal waste, vegetable and food processing wastes, and industrial wastes. Starting in 1970, Sanitary Landfill Inc. (SLI) operated an on-site sanitary landfill. SLI accepted industrial wastes and hazardous waste. During the 1970s, SLI was cited several times by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) for violations of landfill regulations. In 1979, analysis of on-site groundwater revealed that it was contaminated. The NJDEP ordered the landfill closed in 1980 and operations ceased. In 1981, as part of the closure plan, SLI capped the landfill with 18" of clay, installed a gas collection and venting system, and began a groundwater monitoring program. Groundwater studies conducted by SLI, and the USEPA, confirmed on-site groundwater contamination in the landfill area.(10)

Releases from several sources at the CGC site, including various on-site industrial activities, have resulted in of multiple plumes of area groundwater contamination. The CGC site groundwater is known to be contaminated with arsenic, manganese and volatile organic compounds, including chloroform, benzene, chlorobenzene, 1,2-dichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene and vinyl chloride.(10)

In 1989, the USEPA completed a Remedial Investigation (RI) at the CGC site. The RI included the installation of monitoring wells and sampling of groundwater to characterize the site. The study revealed that the hydrogeology of the site is complicated by the presence of clay layers, called "lenses," beneath the site. These clay lenses tend to create a shallow aquifer above a deep aquifer. The RI noted that both the shallow and the deep aquifers were contaminated.(5)

The USEPA completed its Feasibility Study (FS) at the CGC site in 1990. A Record of Decision (ROD), signed on September 28, 1990, selected a remedy from the FS for the first operable unit (Groundwater Remediation) at the site. The selected remedy includes: pumping contaminated groundwater from both the shallow and the deep aquifers, treating it to remove contamination, and re-injecting the treated groundwater into the deep aquifer.(11)

On July 9, 1991, an Administrative Order (AO) was issued to SLI by the USEPA. The AO required SLI to proceed with the remedial design and clean-up of the site. The remediation plan was approved by the USEPA on May 28, 1993. As mentioned above, remediation is being addressed in two stages, known as operable units. The first operable unit is directed at the cleanup of the site's contaminated groundwater. The second operable unit will address the effectiveness of the clay cap in reducing the generation of leachate. The USEPA also required SLI to conduct groundwater monitoring and various hydrogeologic investigations. The SLI groundwater monitoring program began in February 1994 and continues as of this date. (10)

The final remedial design report was completed in December 1998 and construction of the treatment facilities started. Construction of the groundwater pump and treat system is complete and the operation of this unit began in February 2000.(10)

B. Demography and Land Use

The Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination site is located in an area of mixed residential, and light to heavy industrial properties. In addition to the two former landfill areas owned by Sanitary Landfill Inc. (SLI), there are several other companies located on the site. These include: Del-Val Ink and Color, Hoeganaese Corporation, BOC Group (formerly Airco Industrial Gases), L and L Redimix, Meredith Paving and AFG Industries, Inc. (Figure 3).(5) There are no school or day care facilities within 200 feet of the property. The Cinnaminson High School is about 3,500 feet southwest of the site. The high school is on the public water supply.

The site lies within an outcrop area of the Potomac Group and Magothy formation. Groundwater flow under the site is very complicated due to hydrogeologic formations under the site (e.g. clay lenses) and the effects of the nearby Delaware River. The groundwater, however, generally moves in a southerly direction towards a regional groundwater cone of depression in the Camden, New Jersey area.

There are both public and private water supply wells within a mile of the site; however, the private wells are not being used for potable purposes. The closest public supply well belongs to the New Jersey American Water Company (NJAWC). These supply wells (wells 14 and 26) are located on New Albany Road directly down gradient of the CGC site about 5000 feet south of Route 130 (Figure 4).(6)

Population demographics based upon the 1990 census have been prepared by the ATSDR using area-proportion spatial analysis, and are presented in Figure 2. Within a one mile radius there are approximately 4687 homes with as many as 13,022 people.

C. Past ATSDR/NJDHSS Involvement

The ATSDR/NJDHSS completed an initial Health Assessment for the Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination site, dated July 30, 1990. In addition to the 1990 Health Assessment, the NJDHSS has conducted two analyses of cancer incidence in residents of the East Riverton section of Cinnaminson. These studies, conducted in April 1986 and December 1999, were a response to local citizens' concerns about perceived excess cancer incidences in their community.

The following is a review of these three documents :

1990 Health Assessment (7)

In this initial Health Assessment, the ATSDR/NJDHSS determined that the environmental media of concern at the CGC site was the contamination of the area groundwater. The report noted that, at that time, data from nearby potable wells showed that the contaminant plume(s) had not yet reached these wells. Therefore, the Health Assessment found that there was no documentation of any current human exposures to contaminants from the site. The ATSDR/NJDHSS concluded that the CGC site was a "potential public health concern." This hazard category was selected because of the possibility that at some future date site contaminants might reach nearby potable wells. The Health Assessment went on to recommended the need for additional groundwater sampling to further delineate the contaminant plume and to assess what actions might be needed to avoid future contamination of potable wells.

1986 Cancer Incidence Study (12)

In 1986, the NJDHSS conducted an analysis of cancer incidence data among residents of the East Riverton section of Cinnaminson. The East Riverton section of Cinnaminson is the residential section that borders the CGC site to the southwest. In this study, the NJDHSS used cancer incidence data that were available at that time. The study concluded that there was no statistically significant excess of cancer incidence in East Riverton as compared with the rest of New Jersey. The conclusions of this study were given, by letter, to the Health Officer of the Burlington County Health Department (BCHD).

1999 Cancer Incidence Study (13)

In 1999, the NJDHSS conducted a second analysis of cancer incidence data among residents of the East Riverton section of Cinnaminson. East Riverton residents were concerned about various cancers in their community. The Department used cancer incidence data from the years 1979 through 1997, inclusive. The study evaluated data for 19 different types of cancer. The results of the analysis indicated that cancer incidence rates and the proportional distribution of most cancer types were similar when comparing East Riverton and the entire State. The results showed some types of cancers, such as esophagus and bladder, to be higher than expected, and other types of cancers, such as leukemia and uterine, were determined to be lower than expected. It was concluded that there was no evidence to suggest that any of the cancers are related to environmental contamination in the East Riverton area. The conclusions of this study were presented to East Riverton residents by staff of the NJDHSS, at a public meeting on December 6, 1999.

D. Site Visit

On December 10, 1999, S. Hooper, N.P. Singh and J. Winegar of the NJDHSS visited the CGC site. The NJDHSS was accompanied by T. Mignone of the ATSDR. In addition, representatives of the USEPA and the Burlington County Health Department were also present. The following observations were made during the site visit:

  • The site area was a mix of light to heavy industrial and residential properties.


  • The two former landfill sections of the site still can be seen as large mounds. These mounds have been covered with clean soil and then seeded. A gas collection system can also be seen on the mounds.


  • The "Pump and Treat" building appeared to be almost completed and ready to begin operation.


  • The fence around the landfill appeared to be in excellent repair and would make trespassing in this section difficult. In fact, there was no evidence of trespassing at the former landfill. In addition, each of the facilities located on the site appear to be fenced to prevent trespassing.

During the site visit it was established that there were no known or suspected radiological or biological hazards associated with the site. Several private residences in the vicinity of the site are known to have private wells. These wells, however, are not used as a source of potable water.


DISCUSSION

Environmental Contamination and Pathways Analysis

This section contains a discussion of the site-related contamination and the exposure pathways at the site. An exposure pathway is the process by which an individual is exposed to contaminants that originate from some source of contamination.

ATSDR/NJDHSS classifies exposure pathways into three groups: (1) "completed pathways," that is, those in which exposure has occurred, is occurring, or will occur; (2) "potential pathways," that is, those in which exposure might have occurred, may be occurring, or may yet occur; and (3) "eliminated pathways," that is, those that can be eliminated from further analysis because one of the five elements is missing and will never be present, or in which no contaminants of concern can be identified.(14)

A completed exposure pathway must include each of five elements that link a contaminant source to a receptor population. The five elements of a completed exposure pathway are the following:

(1) source of contamination;
(2) environmental media and transport mechanisms;
(3) point of exposure;
(4) route of exposure; and
(5) receptor population.

A. On-Site Groundwater

On-site groundwater is known to be contaminated. Releases from several sources at the Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination site, including various on-site industrial activities and landfilling of wastes, have resulted in a contaminant plume.(6) This plume actually consists of three smaller plumes (Figure 4). The first plume, or East Central Plume, moves from the "core area" near the mounds, towards the south-southeast. The second, or West Central Plume, migrates from the middle of the site, just west of the landfill mounds and it also migrates towards the south-southeast. The third, and largest plume, moves along the southwestern border of the site. This plume, which may originate under the AFG Industries property, is referred to as the Union Landing Road Plume. Groundwater from this plume mixes with groundwater flowing from beneath the landfill area. The Union Landing Road Plume contains some of the highest concentrations of contaminants measured at the CGC site. As with the other plumes, it generally moves towards the south-southeast. Groundwater contamination specifically associated with the AFG Industries property is also being overseen by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, under the Voluntary Cleanup Program, in coordination with the USEPA. As noted previously, the groundwater flow under the site is very complicated and movement may occur in other directions.

Groundwater collected from the numerous monitoring wells at the CGC site has been shown to be heavily contaminated with arsenic, manganese and many volatile organic compounds, including chloroform, benzene, chlorobenzene, 1,2-dichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene and vinyl chloride..(4,6) Table 1 is a listing of the more important contaminants of concern collected from monitoring wells during the two most recent sampling events.

B. On-Site Soil

The CGC site consists of two inactive landfills, and light to heavy industrial properties. Some of the industrial facilities are known to have petroleum underground storage tanks. One industrial facility has an unlined slurry pit and cooling ponds. The landfill portion of the CGC site is known to have accepted industrial wastes and hazardous waste.

The contaminated soil in the landfill areas are inaccessible. In 1981, as part of the closure plan, SLI capped the landfill with 18" of clay, and installed a gas collection and venting system. The landfill is also fenced off to prevent public access. The fence around the landfill appeared to be in excellent repair and would make trespassing in this section difficult.

C. Off-Site Groundwater

Data collected from monitoring wells have identified a "core area" of contamination under the CGC site, and most of the extent of the south-southeastern movement of the three plumes has been characterized. Additional monitoring wells south of Route 130 are planned to further delineate the outer edge of the plume.(6)

The USEPA noted in 1986 (8) that approximately 52,700 people were served by individual home and public wells within a 3 mile radius of the site. While contamination, at that time, could not be attributed to the CGC site, the USEPA did acknowledge the potential for such contamination, due to the proximity of these wells to the site.

Contaminated groundwater may have reached the public supply in 1990. Specifically, the USEPA has suspected that the edge of the contaminant plume may have reached the New Jersey American Water Company (NJAWC) supply wells (wells 14 and 26) located on New Albany Road. The New Albany Road supply wells are located directly downgradient of the CGC site about 5000 feet south of Route 130. Based on currently available data, however, this contamination cannot be attributed to the site. The USEPA and the NJDEP are currently gathering downgradient monitoring well data for a study that will try to delineate the extent of the contamination plume south of Route 130.

According to NJAWC, they first began detecting volatile organic compounds, specifically trichloroethene (TCE), in the supply wells beginning early in 1990. These supply wells are currently only being used on an intermittent basis on weekends, during the summer, and for a few hours during the week. It is important to note that any drinking water extracted from the New Albany Road supply wells is first piped to the Pomona Road station (located about 2 miles to the west). The water is then treated with granular activated carbon to remove any VOCs before entering the distribution system.(6)

D. Ground Water/Private Wells

The NJAWC began providing public water to residents and businesses near the CGC site in the early 1980s. In 1995, the USEPA had reported that all but two residences received drinking water from NJAWC.(9) Early in 1999, the Burlington County Health Department (BCHD) conducted a private well survey of the East Riverton community near the CGC site.(15) Of the 128 residents responding to the survey, 12 respondents indicated that they had operable private wells. Under the direction of the BCHD, the New Jersey American Water Company was able to sample 9 of the 12 wells. The three remaining wells were not tested due to various problems such as broken pumps or canceled appointments. Table 2 below is a summary of analytical results from these private wells.

The results of the residential well testing has shown that some of these wells have been impacted by the site, specifically, those contaminated private wells that appear to be downgradient of the CGC site. These residences are connected to the public water supply system in the area. The contaminated wells are not being used as a source of potable water.

Past exposure to contaminated drinking water from private wells is difficult to evaluate. In 1990, the NJDHSS health assessment indicated that "it did not appear that the groundwater plume (s) have reached the potable wells."(7) Most residences are reported to have been connected to public water prior to that date (since the early 1980s). While exposures to contaminated drinking water were possible (albeit not site-related) before residences were connected to public water, there are no data describing private well quality available for review by the ATSDR/NJDHSS. In addition, there are no data describing residential well quality between 1990 and the recent well survey in 1999 which would indicate the time of the plume's arrival at these wells. Sporadic exposure may have occurred among residents with access to private wells, through non-potable domestic uses.

Environmental Contamination and Exposure Pathways Summary

Groundwater contamination is considered to be the only major environmental media that is potentially related to a human exposure pathway at the site. Site-related groundwater contamination, possibly in combination with non-site sources, may be adversely impacting a few private and public supply wells in the vicinity of the site. As noted above, the USEPA and the NJDEP are currently collecting data to further characterize the nature and extent of the plume and determine if this nearby contamination is definitively site related. The contaminated private wells are not being used for a source of potable water.

Potential pathways may currently exist for those residents who still have access to contaminated private wells. However, potential exposure doses associated with non-potable uses (e.g., irrigation, washing of cars) through dermal contact or inhalation would not likely occur at a level of public health significance. Moreover, any contaminated water from down gradient public supply wells is first piped to the Pomona Road station and then treated with granular activated carbon to remove any detected VOCs before being used. Therefore, based upon current site conditions and data available, there are no completed human exposure pathways associated with the CGC site.

Public Health Implications

Toxicological and Epidemiological Evaluation

There were no completed exposure pathways associated with the CGC site which merit toxicological and epidemiological evaluation.


HEALTH OUTCOME DATA

There are multiple sources of health outcome data in New Jersey. State and local data for heath outcome information include the New Jersey State Cancer Registry, Birth Defects Registry, Vital Statistics Records, Renal Dialysis Network, and Hospital Discharge Reports. Federal databases such as those maintained by the agencies within the US Department of Health and Human Services (i.e. National Cancer Institute, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, and ATSDR) are not site-specific, but may be used for comparison or evaluation purposes.

The results of the cancer incidence analyses conducted of the East Riverton section of Cinnaminson indicated that cancer incidence rates and the proportional distribution of most cancers were similar when comparing East Riverton to the entire State.


ATSDR CHILD HEALTH INITIATIVE

ATSDR's Child Health Initiative recognizes that the unique vulnerabilities of infants and children demand special emphasis in communities faced with contamination in their environment. Children are at greater risk than adults from certain kinds of exposures to hazardous substances emitted from a waste site. They are more likely to be exposed because they play outdoors and they often bring food into contaminated areas. They are shorter than adults, which means they breathe dust, soil, and heavy vapors closer to the ground. Children are also smaller, resulting in higher doses of chemical exposure per body weight. The developing body systems of children can sustain permanent damage if toxic exposures occur during critical growth stages. Most important, children depend completely on adults for risk identification and management decisions, housing decisions, and access to medical care.

There were no completed exposure pathways associated with the CGC site. Therefore, the NJDHSS/ATSDR have determined that children are not presently considered to be at risk from this site. If site conditions change that result in potential exposures to children or pregnant women, the NJDHSS/ATSDR will re-examine childhood health issues.


COMMUNITY HEALTH CONCERNS

In order to gather information on community health concerns at the Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination site (CGC), NJDHSS spoke with staff of the Burlington County Health Department (BCHD). The residents are specifically concerned about perceived increases in cancers among residents in their neighborhoods. These concerns have been addressed by the NJDHSS through two analyses of cancer incidence in the East Riverton section of Cinnaminson. These studies, described above, were a direct response to local citizen's concerns about cancer in the community.

The ATSDR and the NJDHSS will review and evaluate any community health concerns which may arise. Current remedial work at the site and the release of the public health assessment may generate interest among the public during the public comment period. Any comments thus received will be addressed in a subsequent responsiveness summary.


PUBLIC COMMENT

Public comment was solicited from September 18 - October 18, 2000. No comments were received.


CONCLUSIONS

Hazard Category: Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination Site

Based on the information reviewed, the ATSDR and NJDHSS have concluded that the Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination (CGC) site currently poses no apparent public health hazard. Evaluation of site data does not indicate the presence of completed human exposure pathways associated with the site. Although is is possible that exposure could occur through non-potable uses of private wells, it is unlikely that the magnitude of such exposures would be of public health concern.

Community concerns associated with the CGC site have been centered on some residents' perceived increase in cancer incidence in their neighborhoods. These concerns were addressed by the NJDHSS by performing two analyses of cancer incidence in the East Riverton sub-section of Cinnaminson. The results of these analyses indicated that cancer incidence rates, and the proportional distribution of most cancer types, were similar to rates found for the entire State.

Although the ATSDR and the NJDHSS have not identified a completed human exposure pathway associated with the CGC site, groundwater contamination is present at levels of potential public health concern. Data collected from monitoring wells have identified a "core area" of contamination under the CGC site. USEPA has suspected that the edge of the contaminant plume may have reached the New Jersey American Water Company supply wells located on New Albany Road, about 5000 feet south of Route 130. Based on currently available data, however, this contamination cannot be attributed to the site. The USEPA and the NJDEP are currently gathering downgradient monitoring well data for a study that will try to delineate the extent of the contamination plume south of Route 130. According to NJAWC, they first began detecting volatile organic compounds, specifically trichloroethylene (TCE), in the New Albany Road supply wells in early 1990. These supply wells are currently only being used on an intermittent basis and any drinking water extracted from the New Albany Road supply wells is treated to remove any detected VOCs.

The results of recent (1999) private residential well testing by the Burlington County Health Department have shown that some of these private wells may have been impacted by the site. These residences have been connected to the public water supply system in the area since the early 1980s. There are no data describing private potable well quality in the past (before residences were connected to the public water supply). Current information indicates that private wells are not being utilized for potable purposes. However, some private wells may remain in use for non-potable domestic purposes.


RECOMMENDATIONS

A. Cease/Reduce Exposure Recommendations

Based upon available data and information, there are no identifiable exposures occurring associated with the Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination (CGC) site.

  1. The BCHD should continue, through regulation and testing of existing or new private potable wells in potentially affected areas, to ensure that the groundwater exposure pathway remains interrupted.

B. Site Characterization

The following should occur to provide information needed to further evaluate the public health impact of the Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination (CGC) site:

  1. Continue hydrogeologic investigations of area groundwater to fully characterize the extent of contaminant migration from the site, particularly south of Route 130 and near the New Albany Road supply wells.


  2. Continue remedial investigations at the AFG/BOC site to fully characterize the nature and extent of the contamination.

PUBLIC HEALTH ACTIONS

The Public Health Action Plan (PHAP) for the Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination (CGC) site contains a description of the actions to be taken by ATSDR and/or NJDHSS at or in the vicinity of the site subsequent to the completion of this Public Health Assessment. The purpose of the PHAP is to ensure that this health assessment not only identifies public health hazards, but provides a plan of action designed to mitigate and prevent adverse human health effects resulting from exposure to hazardous substances in the environment. Included is a commitment on the part of ATSDR/NJDHSS to follow up on this plan to ensure that it is implemented. The public health actions to be implemented by ATSDR/NJDHSS are as follows:

A. Public Health Actions Taken

  1. Environmental data have been evaluated within the context of human exposure pathways and relevant public health issues.


  2. The NJDHSS has conducted two analyses of cancer incidence in the East Riverton section of Cinnaminson. These studies were a direct response to local citizens' concerns about cancer in their community. These data from the recent study were presented to area residents by NJDHSS staff at a public meeting.

B. Public Health Actions Planned

  1. ATSDR and the NJDHSS will, if necessary, coordinate with the appropriate environmental agencies to develop plans to implement the cease/reduce exposure and site characterization recommendations contained in this public health assessment.


  2. The NJDHSS will prepare a site specific Citizen's Guide for the CGC site which will be made available to the BCHD and other interested parties.


  3. The ATSDR/NJDHSS will remain available to the BCHD to address community needs and concerns.


  4. This Public Health Assessment will be placed in a local repository, and will be provided to persons who request it.


  5. The ATSDR and the NJDHSS will reevaluate and expand the Public Health Action Plan (PHAP) as warranted. New environmental, toxicological, or health outcome data, or the results of implementing the above proposed actions, may determine the need for additional actions at these sites.

CERTIFICATION

This Public Health Assessment was prepared by the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services (NJDHSS) under a cooperative agreement with the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). It is in accordance with approved methodology and procedures existing at the time the Public Health Assessment was begun.

 

Gregory V. Ulirsch
Technical Project Officer
Superfund Site Assessment Branch (SSAB)
Division of Health Assessment and Consultation (DHAC)
ATSDR


The Division of Health Assessment and Consultation, ATSDR, has reviewed this Public Health Assessment and concurs with its findings.

 

Richard Gillig
Chief, SSAB, DHAC, ATSDR


PREPARERS OF REPORT

Preparer of Report:

Jeffrey J. Winegar
Research Scientist; Health Assessment Project
Consumer and Environmental Health Services
New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services


ATSDR Regional Representative:

Tom Mignone
Regional Representative; Region II
Regional Operations
Office of the Assistant Administrator


ATSDR Technical Project Officer:

Gregory V. Ulirsch
Environmental Health Engineer
Superfund Site Assessment Branch (SSAB)
Division of Health Assessment and Consultation


Any questions concerning this document should be directed to:

James Pasqualo
Health Assessment Project Manager
New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services
Consumer and Environmental Health Service
210 South Broad Street
PO Box 360
Trenton, NJ 08625-0360


REFERENCES

Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination (CGC) Site

  1. Golder Associates, Remedial Design Work Plan, Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination Site, Burlington County, New Jersey, November 1992.


  2. Golder Associates, Groundwater Monitoring Report, February 1994 Sampling Event, Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination Site, Burlington County, New Jersey, May 1994.


  3. Golder Associates, Groundwater Monitoring Report, November 1995 Sampling Event, Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination Site, Burlington County, New Jersey, March 1996.


  4. Golder Associates, Perched Zone, Groundwater Monitoring Report, July 1997 Sampling Event, Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination Site, Burlington County, New Jersey, September 1997.


  5. Golder Associates, Preliminary (50%) Revised Remedial Design, Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination Site, Burlington County, New Jersey, September 1997.


  6. Golder Associates, Final (100%) Revised Remedial Design, Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination Site, Burlington County, New Jersey, December 1998.


  7. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, Health Assessment, Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination Site, Burlington County, New Jersey, July 30, 1990.


  8. US Environmental Protection Agency, Environmental Facts, Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination Site, Burlington County, New Jersey, April 1986.


  9. US Environmental Protection Agency, Final Community Relations Plan, Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination Study Area, Burlington County, New Jersey, November 26, 1985.


  10. US Environmental Protection Agency, National Priority Site Fact Sheet, Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination Site, Burlington County, New Jersey, Revised March 23, 1999.


  11. US Environmental Protection Agency, Superfund Record of Decision (ROD) Abstract, Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination Site, Burlington County, New Jersey, January 14, 1999.


  12. New Jersey Department of Health, Letter from Joseph E. Rizzo to Walter Trommelen, H.O., RE: Analysis of Cancer Incidence in East Riverton, Burlington County, New Jersey, April 10, 1986.


  13. New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, Letter from Eddy A Bresnitz, MD, MPH to East Riverton Residents, RE: Survey of Cancer Incidence in East Riverton Section of Cinnaminson, Burlington County, New Jersey, December 6, 1999.


  14. Agency For Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Health Assessment Guidance Manual. Chelsea, Michigan: Lewis Publishers, 1992.


  15. Burlington County Health Department, Letter from Frank Ripoli, Jr. to Kevin Dixon, RE: Water Testing of Private Wells in East Riverton, Cinnaminson, February 8, 1999.

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  15. O
  16. P
  17. Q
  18. R
  19. S
  20. T
  21. U
  22. V
  23. W
  24. X
  25. Y
  26. Z
  27. #