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PUBLIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT

JACKSON TOWNSHIP LANDFILL
JACKSON TOWNSHIP, OCEAN COUNTY, NEW JERSEY


APPENDICES

APPENDIX A

Figure 1. Site Location Map
Figure 1. Site Location Map

Figure 2. Generalized Land Use Map
Figure 2. Generalized Land Use Map

Figure 3. Soil Boring Locations
Figure 3. Soil Boring Locations

Figure 4. Current Monitoring Well Locations
Figure 4. Current Monitoring Well Locations

Figure 5. Surface Water & Sediment Sample Locations
Figure 5. Surface Water & Sediment Sample Locations




APPENDIX B

CHRONOLOGY OF EVENTS

April 1972 Jackson Township Landfill began its operations.

August 22, 1972

The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and Energy (NJDEPE) cited Jackson Township for accepting excessive quantities of septic sludges.

1972

Residents of the Legler section of Jackson Township began reporting that odors were coming from the landfill.

Early 1974 NJDEPE cited the Township for lagooning (i.e., pooling) and failing to cover septic sludges.

Late 1970's Water level contour maps indicated mounding of the water table at the landfill resulting in ground-water flow in two directions.

Early 1977

Legler residents began reporting medical problems from drinking well water to Township health officials.

May 31, 1977

NJDEPE directed the Township to install monitoring wells throughout the landfill area.

1978

NJDEPE documented the contamination of five on-site monitoring wells and 26 off-site potable wells with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including benzene, chloroform, methylene chloride and 1,1,1-trichloroethylene.

Late 1978 NJDEPE and local health officials directed area residents not to drink the water from shallow wells. The Township began supplying bottled water to Legler residents.

December 20, 1978 NJDEPE directed the Township to cease accepting liquid wastes at the landfill.

August 31, 1979

The Concerned Citizens Committee filed a class action suit against the Township for negligence in the operation of the landfill.

January 1980

The New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH) conducted a health survey of 94 Legler households.

February 11, 1980 Jackson Township Landfill ceased its operations. NJDEPE issued an Administrative Consent Order to the Township requiring the Township to complete a design for landfill closure, determine the extent of ground water and surface water contamination, and develop site remediation plans.

July 19, 1980

The Township completed the installation of a public water supply system to serve Legler residents.

December 1981 New Jersey Superior Court ordered the Township to submit a landfill closure plan and a New Jersey Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NJPDES) application for ground-water monitoring to NJDEPE.

December 1981/
February 1982

The Township sampled 22 monitoring wells and 8 private potable wells for priority pollutants. No VOCs were detected.

September 1982 The Township submitted a landfill closure plan to NJDEPE.

December 1982

Jackson Township Landfill was included on the National Priorities List (NPL) issued by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA).

December 2, 1982

NJDEPE sampled deep monitoring wells for priority pollutants. No VOCs were detected.

March 23, 1983

NJDEPE conditionally approved the landfill closure plan.

July 1983 NJDOH completes a report on the January 1980 health survey of Legler residents.

August 1983 The Township submitted a NJPDES application to NJDEPE.

September 1983 The Remedial Action Master Plan (Hart Associates) prepared for USEPA recommended that further site investigation be performed.

September 1983

New Jersey Superior Court began its hearing of the class action suit against the Township.

November 17, 1983 New Jersey Superior Court found Jackson Township negligent in its landfill operations and awarded Legler residents about $15.8 million in damages for impairment of quality of life, emotional distress, and medical surveillance.

July 1984

NJDEPE drafted a revised NJPDES ground-water discharge permit as a supplement to the landfill closure plan to monitor ground-water quality.

October 10, 1984

NJDEPE held a public hearing to present the revised NJPDES ground-water discharge permit.

1985 NJDEPE sampled four monitoring wells and one residential well for priority pollutants. Chlorobenzene was detected in one monitoring well.

May 20, 1985

NJDEPE issued the revised NJPDES ground-water discharge permit to the Township.

June 1985 Appellate Division of New Jersey Superior Court annulled over $10.4 million of the 1983 settlement awarded for emotional distress and medical surveillance.

November 13, 1987

NJDEPE issued a revised Judicial Consent Order (JCO) to the Township requiring the Township to (1) conduct a Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (RI/FS); and (2) submit and implement the final landfill closure plan, and implement the NJPDES ground-water discharge permit requirements, based on the findings of the RI/FS.

May 7, 1987 New Jersey Supreme Court reinstated the amount of the 1983 settlement awarded for medical surveillance.

August 22, 1988 The Township and NJDEPE enter into the JCO issued in November 1987.

April 21, 1989 Fellows, Read & Associates, Inc., completed a Preliminary Investigation (PI) to provide additional site information.

Summer 1989 The Township installed a chain link fence around the site.

March 29, 1990

NJDEPE approved the RI Work Plan.

November 30, 1990

Fellows, Read & Associates, Inc., completed the draft RI Summary Report.



APPENDIX C

Response Summary

This response summary represents those comments and reactions tothe Public Health Assessment received during the Public CommentPeriod described in the Community Concerns Evaluation section. Insome cases, similar commentary was received from various sources,while other concerns are specific to individuals or groups. Comments and concerns have been grouped by content where possibleand are followed by the consequent response.

Comment:

A respondent felt that the NJDOH request in the Public HealthAssessment for additional surface soil sampling (0 to 3 inches) wasnot necessary. They submitted a recent, July 15, 1993, RiskAssessment for the Jackson Township Landfill site as support fortheir claim that the soil samples were adequate in number andlocation to characterize the site related contaminants.

Response:

The NJDOH has reviewed the July 15, 1993 Risk Assessment. The riskassessment is based on data from the 1990 remedial investigationwhich is included in the data evaluated for this public healthassessment. Available environmental data for on-site soils (0-24inches) do not allow for a complete and comprehensive evaluation ofexposure to surface soil from a public health perspective. However, the construction of 6-foot fence around the site shouldhelp minimize the potential for exposure to on-site soilcontaminants.

Comment:

A respondent felt that the NJDOH request in the Public HealthAssessment for additional methane gas monitoring, particularly inthe homes located near the landfill, was not necessary. They feltthat the methane gas monitoring that has been and is being performed at the site is sufficient to detect any gas that maymigrate towards the residences.

Response:

Although the methane monitoring program does not include samplingof residential indoor air, we agree that the revised monitoringprogram suggested by the NJDEPE should be sufficient to detectlandfill gases before they pose a threat to nearby residences. ThePublic Helath Action Plan has been revised to include this actionby NJDEPE.

Comment:

A respondent felt that the NJDOH request in the Public HealthAssessment to restrict public access to the site would be satisfiedthrough the installation of a 6-foot chain link fence.

Response:

The NJDOH identified a need to restrict public access to the site. This is currently being addressed by the construction of aperimeter fence. The Public Health Action Plan has been revised toinclude this action by NJDEPE.

Comment:

A respondent felt that the NJDOH request in the Public HealthAssessment for various health and safety issues, which could ariseduring landfill closure and remediation, would be satisfied by theSite Health and Safety Plan that they prepared in November 1989.

Response:

The NJDOH identified a need for various health and safety andoccupational issues to be addressed at the site. These concernsshould be satisfied by the Site Health and Safety Plan prepared inNovember 1989.

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