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HEALTH CONSULTATION

BANCROFT HOMES
BANCROFT, CUMING COUNTY, NEBRASKA

October 31, 1997

Prepared by:

Exposure Investigation and Consultation Branch
Division of Health Assessment and Consultation
Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry


BACKGROUND AND STATEMENT OF ISSUES

The Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality asked the Agencyfor Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) to reviewenvironmental data collected at the Bancroft Homes Site anddetermine whether contamination in indoor air poses a publichealth hazard. ATSDR has previously evaluated five rounds ofindoor air data collected from three private homes at the site[1,2,3,4,5].

In the most recent sampling event (June-July 1997), indoor airsamples were collected from two houses. The concentrations ofcontaminants detected in a living area of the two homes appear inthe table below:

Property Benzene
(ppb)
Toluene
(ppb)
Ethyl
benzene
(ppb)
Xylenes
(ppb)
1Hydro-
carbons
(ppb)
Bargmann ND (3.7) 3.7ND (2.5) ND (3.9) 155
LutjenND (21.9) 300ND (15.4)ND (24.3) 1620
(1) Total hydrocarbons, as gasoline
ppb - parts per billion
ND - not detected (detection limit)


DISCUSSION

The concentrations of air contaminants detected in the Bargmannhome are comparable to levels that have previously been detectedin the homes [1,2,3,4,5]; these levels do not pose a health hazard.

In the Lutjen home, the air levels of toluene and totalhydrocarbons were higher than previously detected levels. Thereason for these increases is not known. Benzene, ethyl benzene,and xylenes were not detected, but the analytical detectionlimits were high (see table).

Although the air levels of toluene and total hydrocarbons in theLutjen home were elevated, they would not be expected to pose ahealth hazard. As discussed in previous reports, benzene is theair contaminant at the Bancroft Homes site that poses thegreatest health hazard. Because of the high detection limit forbenzene in the Lutjen home (22 parts per billion), we cannotdetermine whether benzene was in the air at a level of healthconcern.



CONCLUSIONS
(1) The concentrations of air contaminants detected in a living area of the Bargmann house were not at levels of health concern.

(2) The concentrations of air contaminants detected in a living area of the Lutjen house increased over previous monitoring results. The reason for the increases is not known.

(3) The detection limit for benzene in indoor air in the Lutjen house was too high to determine whether benzene was present at a level of health concern.



RECOMMENDATIONS
(1) Continue indoor air monitoring until remediation is complete.
   
    Kenneth G. Orloff, PhD, DABT
Senior Toxicologist


REFERENCES
(1) Kenneth G. Orloff; Bancroft Homes - ATSDR Record of Activity with David Parker; November 5, 1996.

(2) Kenneth G. Orloff; Bancroft Homes - ATSDR Record of Activity with David Parker; November 26 1996.

(3)

Kenneth G. Orloff; Bancroft Homes - ATSDR Record of Activity with David Parker; February 10, 1997.

(4) Kenneth G. Orloff; Bancroft Homes - ATSDR Record of Activity with David Parker; March 18, 1997.

(5) Kenneth G. Orloff; Bancroft Homes - Health Consultation; May 15, 1997.
  
 
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