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HEALTH CONSULTATION

CITY OF FORT VALLEY UTILITIES COMMISSION
PUBLIC WATER SUPPLY SYSTEM
FORT VALLEY, PEACH COUNTY, GEORGIA
(In association with the Peach County Landfill Petition Site)


BACKGROUND

The Agency for Toxic Substance and Disease Registry (ATSDR) was petitioned by the Peach County Board of Commissioners to conduct a Health Consultation to evaluate the water supplied by the city of Fort Valley Utilities Commission (FVUC). The petitioner requested the Health Consultation to determine if the potable water supplied to the residents of Fort Valley and Peach County is in compliance with all applicable federal and state water quality standards. The request for the Health Consultation is a result of the concerns of a small community of county residents that the potable water supplied by the FVUC is either currently or has the potential to become unsafe for consumption. The concerns are based on the proximity of the FVUCs municipal water supply production wells to the Woolfolk Chemical Works National Priorities List (NPL) site located in downtown Fort Valley, Georgia.

Peach County is the owner/operator of a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill (MSWLF) located on Housers Mill Road in Peach County, Georgia. See Figure 1 for the location of the Housers Mill MSWLF. Peach County operated the Housers Mill MSWLF from February 1978 until April 1994. In March 1997, the Georgia Environmental Protection Division (EPD) directed Peach County to initiate an assessment of corrective measures at the MSWLF. (1) This EPD directive was due to the detection of regulated chemical compounds in the landfill's perimeter groundwater monitor wells at levels above the Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) listed in the Georgia Rules for Safe Drinking Water, Chapter 391-3-4-.14. Tribble and Richardson Inc. (T&R) conducted the assessment of corrective measures for Peach County to determine the nature and extent of the release. As part of the investigation, T&R collected groundwater samples from a private drinking water supply well owned by a resident living adjacent to the landfill.

Laboratory analytical results of the groundwater samples collected from the private well showed concentrations of 10 micrograms per liter (µg/L) vinyl chloride, 6 µg/L dichloromethane, and 30 µg/L lead. The MCL for vinyl chloride is 2 µg/L. The MCL for dichloromethane is 5 µg/L, and the Action Level for lead is 15 µg/L. As a result, the county informed the property owner affected by the release and began supplying the household with an alternate source of water. T&R collected subsequent groundwater samples from 15 additional private wells located within 1/2 mile down gradient from the landfill. The laboratory analytical results of the groundwater samples indicated 13 of the private wells had detectable concentrations of several volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and/or heavy metals. (2) As an interim measure, the county began providing an alternate source of drinking water to the affected households in April 1997. The alternate source of drinking water is delivered to the residents by a mobile tanker trailer or as bottled water.

In compliance with the State of Georgia Rules of Solid Waste Management, the county is currently preparing a corrective measures assessment report, which will include a remedial action plan for the Housers Mill Landfill. Prior to implementation, the plan must be reviewed and approved by EPD. One objective of the remedial action plan is to provide the residents affected by the release with a permanent source of drinking water. At this time, the county believes the best long-term solution is to extend public water service to the affected residents rather than to install and own a local municipal well. As such, the county is evaluating the two municipal water systems in Peach County, Georgia: the city of Byron Utility Department and the FVUC. Both systems are permitted by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, and each respective system has active water supply lines approximately the same distance from the site. However, the county determined that the FVUC system offers more long-term benefits because of the size of the water lines. The T&R engineering report states that the FVUC system consists of 12" diameter piping and the city of Byron Utility Department water supply system is constructed with 6" inch diameter piping. (3) Because of the data presented in the engineering report, the county determined the larger FVUC water distribution system has the capacity to support future growth and development of the area.

Public Health Concerns and Issues

Discussion between the county and the residents affected by the Housers Mill MSWLF regarding the use of the FVUC water system as an alternate source of water has prompted a high level of concern by the residents. In April 1997, when the county stated its intention to supply the residents with potable water, the residents expressed opposition to water from the FVUC system and requested to be supplied water from the city of Byron system. The residents' apprehension about FVUC water is based on the knowledge that the FVUC production wells are in the proximity of the Woolfolk Chemical Works NPL site. The Woolfolk Chemical Works NPL site has been visible in the community for the past ten years. In August 1996, two FVUC wells were found to have concentrations of tetrachloroethylene or PCE (source of the PCE is currently undetermined) in the raw water pumped from the wells. As a result, the wells were shut down until the nature and extent of the PCE contamination can be determined. The presence of the PCE in the groundwater which supplies the FVUC water supply system prompted the concerns of the residents affected by the Housers Mill MSWLF. (4)

Child Health Initiative

The Georgia Division of Public Health and ATSDR recognize that children are especially sensitive to some contaminants. For that reason, we included children in all of our evaluations.


DISCUSSION

System Description

The FVUC owns and operates a public water system (PWS) permitted by the state of Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Environmental Protection Division (EPD) to supply water to the public for human consumption. The FVUC water system consists of five groundwater production wells, three abandoned production wells, and two water treatment facilities. The three abandoned municipal wells have been plugged and capped according to the Georgia Wellhead Protection Plan prepared for Fort Valley by the Geologic Survey Branch of EPD. Municipal Wells 1, 2, and 5 are near the central business district of downtown Fort Valley. Municipal Wells 3 and 4 are in the southwest portion of town near Fort Valley State University. See Figure 2 for the locations of the FVUC municipal water supply wells. The primary source for raw water (water prior to treatment) is the Tuscaloosa Aquifer which lies approximately 250 feet below ground surface (bgs). (5) However, Municipal Wells 1 and 2 were constructed so that they draw raw water from a depth of 180 - 490 feet bgs, which increases the chance for the wells to become contaminated from upper water bearing zones. (6) The remaining municipal wells (3, 4, and 5) are constructed to draw raw water from deeper depths which decreases the chance of contamination.(7) Prior to the detection of PCE in municipal wells 1 and 2, raw water from municipal wells 1, 2, and 5 was pumped to the McLean treatment facility for treatment and distribution. Currently, only municipal well 5 is supplying raw water to the McLean treatment facility. Raw water from municipal wells 3 and 4 is pumped to the Jones treatment facility for treatment and distribution. The McLean treatment facility currently treats 700,000 to 1.1 million gallons of raw water per day. The Jones treatment facility currently treats 500,000 to 800,000 gallons of raw water per day. (8)

Table 1 presents information regarding well locations, year of construction, depth below ground surface, capacity, and current operating status for each of the five production wells in the FVUC PWS.

On August 8, 1996, FVUC was notified by representatives of Canadyne-Georgia (owner of the Woolfolk NPL site) that laboratory chemical analyses of raw water samples collected from Municipal Wells 1 and 2 detected concentrations of PCE. The groundwater samples were collected from the municipal wells as part of the ongoing remedial investigation of the Woolfolk NPL site, which is located approximately 1,000 feet south of Municipal Wells 1 and 2. A concentration of 1.8 ppb PCE was detected in the raw water sample collected from municipal well 1, and a concentration of 1.0 ppb PCE was detected in the raw water sample collected from municipal well 2. Both of those levels are below the federal MCL for PCE of 5 ppb. (9) Concentrations of PCE were not detected in finished water (water after treatment) that was provided to residents to drink. Although PCE was not detected in the finished water, FVUC shut down Municipal Wells 1 and 2 as a precautionary measure on August 8, 1996, and the wells currently remain inactive.

Tetrachloroethylene is a synthetic chemical that is widely used in the dry cleaning industry and for metal degreasing operations. Other names for tetrachloroethylene include perchloroethylene, PCE, perc, tetrachloroethene, perclene, and perchlor. It evaporates rapidly in air and has a sharp, sweet odor. Human exposure to tetrachloroethylene is usually through use of certain consumer products such as water repellents, silicone lubricants, fabric finishers, spot removers, and other products. The health effects of breathing air or drinking water that havelow levels of tetrachloroethylene are not known. Animal studies using high levels of tetrachloroethylene (doses of 471 to 1,072 mg/kg/day) resulted in the development of liver and kidney cancers. This chemical has not been shown to cause cancer in people. However, the Department of Health and Human Services has determined that tetrachloroethylene may reasonably be anticipated to cause cancer. The Environmental Protection agency (EPA) has determined that drinking water should contain no more than 0.005 mg/L (5 ppb) tetrachloroethylene. Drinking water everyday containing 5 ppb tetrachloroethylene would not result in a dose that is associated with noncancer, adverse health effects nor would that dose result in an increased cancer risk. (10)

Current Water Treatment Process

The FVUC currently draws its raw water from municipal wells 3, 4, and 5. To date, routine sampling of municipal wells 3, 4, and 5 has not detected PCE in the raw water supplied by these wells. Municipal wells 3 and 4 supply raw water to the Jones treatment facility, and municipal well 5 supplies raw water to the McLean treatment facility. Raw water pumped from municipal wells 3 and 4 to the Jones treatment facility undergoes the following treatment process prior to distribution.

  1. The raw water is aerated to remove naturally occurring hydrogen sulfide gas.

  2. Fluoride is added to the water. Fluoride concentration is maintained at 0.8 to 1.2 milligrams per liter (mg/L).

  3. Caustic Soda is added to the raw water to adjust pH. The pH of the raw water ranges from 4.92 to 5.2 prior to treatment. The pH is adjusted to 7.4 to 7.8 at the treatment facility.

  4. Chlorine is added as a disinfectant. Chlorine concentration is maintained at 0.8 to 1.0 mg/kg.

  5. Phosphate is added for corrosion control. Phosphate concentration is maintained at 0.4 to 0.6 mg/L.

  6. After the water moves through chemical treatment, the water is moved through a series of baffles which serves as a mixing process.

  7. After the water has competed the cycle through the baffles, the water moves to a concrete holding tank called a clearwell. Water held in the clearwell has completed the treatment process and is termed finished water. Finished water is pumped to the distribution system on demand and finished water reserves are pumped to an elevated storage tank located on-site. (11)

The raw water treatment process is the same at the McLean facility with the exception of one additional process. As the raw water leaves the aerators, it is pumped to an elevated concrete slab within the McLean facility. The concrete slab has a series of perforations which allows the water to flow down onto racks containing beds of coke (coke is coal that has been heated in the absence of air to drive off volatile components). As the raw water passes through the racks of coke, iron is stripped from the water and adsorbs to the coke as a result of a chemical reaction between the coke and the iron.

Compliance Water Quality Sampling

To comply with the Georgia EPD Rules for Safe Drinking Water Chapter 391-3-5, FVUC collects daily, monthly, and quarterly water samples from the public water supply. Samples are collected from both the raw and finished water. FVUC collects samples of finished water daily to test the water for concentrations of the chemical agents added to the water during the treatment process. Every six hours, or four times a day, the finished water is sampled and tested for chlorine, fluoride, phosphates, and pH. All daily water samples collected from both treatment facilities are analyzed at the McLean facility laboratory. (12) The laboratory at the McLean treatment facility is certified by Georgia EPD to conduct analysis for measurements of operational control (chlorine, fluoride, phosphates and pH). Laboratory results of daily operational control samples are submitted to the Georgia EPD Regional Office in Macon, Georgia, for review.

The following is the compliance monitoring schedule as of December 1997 maintained by the FVUC PWS to satisfy the requirements of the Georgia EPD Rules for Safe Drinking Water.

Sampling Event

Analytical Paramenters
Monthly

Microbiological
Quarterly

Total Trihalomethanes
Annual

Nitrate, Nitrite, and Total Nitrate and Nitrite
Compliance Period
(Every 3 years)
Volatile Organic Compound (VOCs), Inorganic Compounds (IOCs), Synthetic Organic Compounds (SOCs), and Pesticides.

FVUC collects water samples from both treatment facilities monthly for microbiological analyses at the McLean facility laboratory. (12) The laboratory at the McLean treatment facility is certified by Georgia EPD to conduct analysis for microbiological contaminants. Water samples collected for quarterly, annual, and compliance period monitoring are submitted to the Georgia EPD laboratory for chemical analysis. The laboratory analytical results of water samples collected for quarterly, annual, and compliance period monitoring are reviewed by the Georgia EPD, Drinking Water Compliance Program in Atlanta, Georgia, for regulatory compliance.

Microbiological Sampling and Analysis

FVUC collects 11 water samples per month for microbiological analysis. The number of water samples is based on the population served by the system. The laboratory analytical results from November 1996 through November 1997 indicated no detection of microbiological contamination in the water samples collected from the system. (13)

Table 2 presents the laboratory analytical results of finished water samples analyzed for microbiological contaminants from November 1996 through November 1997.

Total Trihalomethane Sampling and Analysis

FVUC conducts quarterly monitoring of the PWS for total trihalomethanes (bromodichloromethane, dichloromethane, chloroform, and bromoform). Trihalomethanes are organic compounds that are formed by the exposure of naturally occurring organic compounds to chlorine in the finished water. Studies in animals indicate long-term exposures to low levels trihalonmethanes may cause cancer. Although no cases of cancer in humans can be definitely attributed to these chemicals, EPA has set 0.10 mg/L as the MCL for total trihalomethanes in drinking water. (14) Finished water samples collected by FVUC are submitted to the Georgia EPD Laboratory in Atlanta, Georgia, for laboratory analysis. The quarterly analytical results from November 1995 through September 1997 indicated concentrations of total trihalomethanes were either below laboratory detection limits or below the MCL of 0.10 mg/L. (15)

Table 3 presents the laboratory analytical results of finished water analyzed for total trihalomethane from November 1995 through September 1997.

Nitrate, Nitrite, and Total Nitrate/Nitrite Sampling and Analysis

FVUC conducts annual monitoring of the public water supply for nitrate, nitrite, and total nitrate/ nitrite. Nitrate, nitrite, and total nitrate/nitrite are monitored on a annual basis because laboratory analytical results from four consecutive quarters in 1993 indicated that nitrate concentrations were less than 50% of the MCL. These inorganic compounds are monitored because of the potential for these contaminates to leach into the groundwater from surface sources such as agricultural operations and septic tank systems. Elevated concentrations of nitrites in drinking water sources can be hazardous to infants under three months of age. (16) Finished water samples are collected by the FVUC from both the Jones and McLean treatment facilities and submitted to the Georgia EPD Laboratory in Atlanta, Georgia, for laboratory analysis. The annual analytical results from May 1994 through September 1997 indicated concentrations of total nitrate/nitrite were below the MCL of 10 mg/L, nitrate concentrations were below the MCL of 10 mg/L, and nitrite concentrations were below the MCL of 1.0 mg/L. (17)

Table 4 presents the laboratory analytical results of finished water analyzed for nitrate, nitrite, and total nitrate/nitrite from May 1994 through September 1997 at the Jones treatment facility. Table 5 presents the laboratory analytical results of finished water analyzed for nitrate, nitrite, and total nitrate/nitrite from May 1994 through September 1997 at the McLean treatment facility.

IOC, SOC, and Pesticides Contaminant Sampling and Analysis

FVUC performs compliance period sampling of the PWS for the presence of IOC (metals), SOC, and pesticides contamination. Georgia EPD initiated requirements to monitor for these contaminants in 1993. Georgia EPD has establised compliance periods into three year blocks. The first compliance period was from 1993 through 1995. The laboratory analytical results from the first compliance period monitoring indicated no detectable concentrations of IOCs, SOCs, or pesticides. (18)

VOC Sampling and Analysis

Until the detection of tetrachloroethylene in Municipal Wells 1 and 2 in August of 1996, FVUC was on an annual monitoring schedule for VOCs. Laboratory analytical results from August 1994 through December 1995 indicated no detectable concentrations of VOCs present in water samples collected at the Jones and McLean treatment facilities.(19)

The detection of tetrachloroethylene in Municipal Wells 1 and 2 in August 1996 prompted the shut-down of Municipal Wells 1 and 2. In October 1996, FVUC began monitoring raw water from the remaining active municipal wells (3, 4, and 5) in the PWS for tetrachloroethylene contamination. The frequency of sample collection from the municipal wells is based on the wells proximity to the inactive Municipal Wells 1 and 2 and the Woolfolk NPL site. As such, Municipal Well 5 is sampled more frequently than Municipal Wells 3 and 4. FVUC initiated this monitoring program. The monitoring was not the result of an EPD directive. Since October 1996, FVUC has collected raw water samples from Municipal Well 5 on a weekly or biweekly schedule. Raw water samples have been collected from Municipal Wells 3 and 4 on a quarterly schedule. The raw water samples are submitted to an independent laboratory for laboratory chemical analysis to determine the presence of tetrachloroethylene. The laboratory analytical results of raw water samples collected from the three active municipal wells from October 1996 through December 1997 indicated no detectable concentration tetrachloroethylene. (20)

Table 6 presents the laboratory analytical results of raw water samples analyzed for the presence of tetrachloroethylene from October 1996 through December 1997 from Municipal Wells 3, 4, and 5.

In March 1997, Dr. John Livingston, who is a local physician, requested permission from FVUC to collect raw water samples from Municipal Wells 2 and 5 and from two other locations. Dr. Livingston's request was based on his concern about the safety of the water supplied by FVUC due to the proximity of Municipal Well 5 to the inactive Municipal Wells 1 and 2. (21) Upon receipt of permission from FVUC, Dr. Livingston collected raw water samples from Municipal Wells 2 and 5 on March 26, 1997. The raw water samples were submitted to an independent laboratory selected by Dr. Livingston for chemical analysis.

The raw water samples were analyzed for VOCs, pesticides, and heavy metals. The laboratory analytical results of the raw water sample collected from the inactive Municipal Well 2 indicated detectable concentrations of tetrachloroethlene present below laboratory quantification limits. No pesticides were detected in the raw water sample. The laboratory analytical results for Municipal Well 2 indicated the presence of metals at 14 µg/L (0.014 ppm) barium and 4 µg/L (0.004 ppm) lead in the raw water sample. These concentrations are below the MCL for barium of 2 ppm and Action Level for lead of 0.015 ppm. The laboratory analytical results of the raw water sample collected from the active Municipal Well 5 indicated no detectable concentrations of VOCs or pesticides present in the water. The laboratory analytical results for Municipal Well 5 indicated the presence of metals at 5 µg/L (0.005 ppm) barium and 6 µg/L (0.006 ppm) lead in the raw water sample. (22) These concentrations are well below the MCL for barium of 2 ppm and Action Level for lead of 0.015 ppm.

In February 1998, the EPD Drinking Water Compliance Program sent written correspondence to FVUC directing FVUC to initiate quarterly monitoring of all active municipal water supply wells in the public water supply for VOCs begining in the first quarter of 1998. This EPD directive was based on the proximity of the public water supply to a known source of groundwater contamination. (23)


CONCLUSION

After review of available data and discussions with EPD and FVUC personnel, the public health threat category for water provided by FVUC can be classified as ATSDR CATEGORY E, NO PUBLIC HEALTH HAZARD. The quality of the water supplied by FVUC corresponds to the ATSDR guidance (24) for this category due to the following conditions:

  • There is no evidence of current or past human exposure to contaminated water.

  • Future exposures to contaminated water is not likely to occur.

  • The water is safe for people to drink and is monitored closely.

ATSDR ACTIONS

No public health actions are recommended at this time because no human exposure is occurring, has occurred in the past, or is likely to occur in the future that may be of public health concern.


REFERENCES

  1. Georgia EPD Solid Waste Management Unit. March 11, 1997 Notice of Violation for Ground water Quality Sampling Results, Peach County - Housers Mill Road MSWLF, Permit No. 111-004D(SL).

  2. Georgia Division of Public Health. Draft Health Consultation, Peach County Housers Mill Road Municipal Solid Waste Landfill, Fort Valley, Georgia. December 1997.

  3. Tribble & Richardson, Inc., Preliminary Engineering Report, Water Supply Replacement, Peach County landfill Contamination for Peach County, Georgia. November 1997.

  4. Letter from Ms. Linda O'Neal to Mr. Bob Hunnicutt of the Fort Valley Utilities Commission Regarding Concerns of the Quality of the Fort Valley Utilities Commission Drinking Water which was Proposed as an Alternate Source of Water to the Housers Mill Residents. May 26, 1997.

  5. CH2MHILL. Draft Remedial Investigation Report. Woolfolk Chemical Works Site, Fort Valley, Georgia. Volume 3. CH2MHILL. July 1992.

  6. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Site Review and Update. Woolfolk Chemical Works, Inc. Fort Valley, Peach County, Georgia. CERCLIS No. GAD003269578. Public Comment Release. October 1997

  7. Fort Valley Utilities Commission. Well Data Sheets. Fort Valley Municipal Water Supply Well 1. February 1954. Well Data Sheets. Fort Valley Municipal Water Supply Well 2. January 1978. Well Data Sheets. Fort Valley Municipal Water Supply Well 3. December 1970. Well Data Sheets. Fort Valley Municipal Water Supply Well 4. February 1971. GEPD Water Resources Management Branch Well Data Sheets. Fort Valley Municipal Water Supply Well 5. November 1990.

  8. Dye, Gary, Fort Valley Utilities Commission, Personal Communication. January 1998

  9. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Site Review and Update. Woolfolk Chemical Works, Inc. Fort Valley, Peach County, Georgia. CERCLIS No. GAD003269578. Public Comment Release. October 1997

  10. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Toxicological Profile for Tetrachloroethylene. Update, September 1997

  11. Dye, Gary, Fort Valley Utilities Commission, Personal Communication. January 1998.

  12. Dye, Gary, Fort Valley Utilities Commission, Personal Communication. January 1998.

  13. Fort Valley Utilities Commission. J.A. McLean Microbiological Laboratory Summary Reports. Laboratory Certification # 310. November 1996 to November 1997.

  14. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Public Health Statement for Bromoform/Chlorodibromomethane. December 1990.

  15. GEPD. Georgia Department of Natural Resources Environmental Protection Division. Laboratory Report Data Sheets for Total Trihalomethanes for the Fort Valley Utilities Commission. Water System ID. 2250001. November 1995 to September 1997.

  16. USGS. Nitrate Nitrogen Concentrations in Shallow Ground water of the Coastal Plain of Albemarle-Pamlico Drainage Study Unit, North Carolina and Virginia. Page 1. 1991.

  17. GEPD. Georgia Department of Natural Resources Environmental Protection Division. Laboratory Report Data Sheets for Nitrate, Nitrite, and Total Nitrate/Nitrite for the Fort Valley Utilities Commission. Water System ID. 2250001. May 1994 to September 1997.

  18. GEPD. Georgia Department of Natural Resources Environmental Protection Division. Laboratory Report Data Sheets for inorganic compounds, volatile organic compounds, synthetic organic compounds, and pesticides for the Fort Valley Utilities Commission. Water System ID. 2250001. May 1994 to September 1997.

  19. GEPD. Georgia Department of Natural Resources Environmental Protection Division. Laboratory Report Data Sheets for VOCs for the Fort Valley Utilities Commission. Water System ID. 2250001. August 1994 to December 1995.

  20. Fort Valley Utilities Commission. Hydrologic, Inc. and Savannah Laboratories & Environmental Services, Inc. laboratory Report Data Sheets for the Fort Valley Utilities Commission. Water System ID. 2250001. October 1996 to December 1997.

  21. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Site Review and Update. Woolfolk Chemical Works, Inc. Fort Valley, Peach County, Georgia. CERCLIS No. GAD003269578. Public Comment Release. October 1997

  22. Dr. John Livingston. Municipal Wells 2 5 Raw Water Samples Laboratory Analytical Results. HYGEIA Laboratories, Inc. laboratory Report Data Sheets. April 1997.

  23. Addison, Brad, GEPD Drinking Water Compliance Program, Personal Communication. February 1998.

  24. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Public Health Assessment Guidance Manual. 1992.

PREPARERS OF REPORT

Georgia Department of Human Resources
Division of Public Health
Toxics and Health Hazards Consultation Section

Steve Hvizdzak, Environmental Health Specialist
Hal Emmett, Environmental Health Consultant

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

Gail Godfrey, Technical Project Officer


CERTIFICATION

This City of For Valley Utilities Commission Public Water Supply System Health Consultation, conducted at the request of Peach County in relation to the Peach County Landfill Site, was prepared by the Georgia Division of Public Health, Toxics and Health Hazards Consultation Section, under a cooperative agreement with the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). It is in accordance with approved methodology and procedures existing at the time the health consultation was begun.

Gail D. Godfrey
Technical Project Officer
Division of Health Assessment and Consultation
ATSDR


The Division of Health Assessment and Consultation, ATSDR, has reviewed this health consultation and concurs with its findings.

Richard E. Gillig
Chief, State Programs Section
Division of Health Assessment and Consultation
ATSDR


APPENDIX A: FIGURES

Figure 1. Housers Mill Landfill Area Map
Excerpt of USGS Topographic Map
Fort Valley East, Georgia Quadrangle

Figure 2. City of Fort Valley Municipal Water - Supply Well Locations
Source: CH2MHILL Draft Remedial Investigation Report
Woolfolk Chemical Works Site - July 1992


Appendix A was not available in electronic format for conversion to HTML at the time of preparation of this document. To obtain a hard copy of the document, please contact:

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry
Division of Health Assessment and Consultation
Attn: Chief, Program Evaluation, Records, and Information Services Branch E-56
1600 Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, Georgia 30333


APPENDIX B: TABLES

Table 1. Fort Valley Utility Commission Water Supply Wells

Well ID Well Location Year of Construction Well Depth Below Ground Surface Capacity Gallon per Minute Status
1 Central Avenue at McLean Water Treatment Plant 1954 488 1,000 Inactive
2 Georgia Route 49 near intersection of Miller Street and Railroad Crossing 1978 495 1,000 Inactive
3 Intersection of Jones Alley and State College Drive 1970 500 1,000 Active
4 Charlesvoix Street and Jones Alley 1971 480 1,300 Active
5 Central Avenue adjacent to Count House 1990 605 1,500 Active


Table 2. Laboratory Analytical Results of Finished Water for Microbiological Contaminants

Month/Year Type of Sample Routine/Repeat/Special Total Number of Samples Number of Samples total Coliform Positive Number of Samples Fecal/E.Coli. Positive
November 1996 Routine 11 0 0
December 1996 Routine 11 0 0
January 1997 Routine 11 0 0
February 1997 Routine/Special 11/3 0/0 0/0
March 1997 Routine 11 0 0
April 1997 Routine/Special 11/3 0/0 0/0
May 1997 Routine 11 0 0
June 1997 Routine 11 0 0
July 1997 Routine/Special 11/1 0/0 0/0
August 1997 Routine/Special 11/6 0/0 0/0
September 1997 Routine 11 0 0
October 1997 Routine/Special 11/1 0/0 0/0
November 1997 Routine/Special 11/1 0/0 0/0

Legend:

Routine - required monthly distribution system sampling
Repeat - additional sampling if a routine sample is total coliform positive
Special - sample(s) collected and analyzed at the request of a customer


Table 3. Laboratory Analytical Results of Finished Water for Trihalomethane

Quarter
Year/Month
Quarter Average
mg/L
MCL
1995/November 0.0050 0.10 mg/L
1996/February 0.0000 0.10 mg/L
1996/May 0.0021 0.10 mg/L
1996/September 0.0000 0.10 mg/L
1996/November 0.0000 0.10 mg/L
1997/March 0.0000 0.10 mg/L
1997/May 0.0014 0.10 mg/L
1997/September 0.0000 0.10 mg/L


Table 4. Laboratory Analytical Results of Finished Water Samples for Nitrate, Nitrite, and Total Nitrate and Nitrite
Jones Facility

Month/Year Nitrate
(MCL 10.0 mg/L)
Nitrite
(MCL 1.0 mg/L)
Total Nitrate/Nitrite
(MCL 10.0 mg/L)
May 1994 0.6 mg/L <0.2 mg/L 0.6 mg/L
July 1995 0.7 mg/L <0.2 mg/L 0.7 mg/L
September 1996 0.7 mg/L <0.2 mg/L 0.7 mg/L
September 1997 0.7 mg/L <0.2 mg/L 0.7 mg/L


Table 5. Laboratory Analytical Results of Finished Water Samples for Nitrate, Nitrite, and Total Nitrate and Nitrite
McLean Facility

Month/Year Nitrate
(MCL 10.0 mg/L)
Nitrite
(MCL 1.0 mg/L)
Total Nitrate/Nitrite
(MCL 10.0 mg/L)
May 1994 0.6 mg/L <0.2 mg/L 0.6 mg/L
July 1995 1.0 mg/L <0.2 mg/L 1.0 mg/L
September 1996 0.4 mg/L <0.2 mg/L 0.4 mg/L
September 1997 0.4 mg/L <0.2 mg/L 0.4 mg/L


Table 6. Laboratory Analytical Results of Raw Water Samples Municipal Wells 3, 4, and 5 for Tetrachloroethylene
µg/L

Date Municipal Well 3 Municipal Well 4 Municipal Well 5
October 24, 1996 NS NS BDL
October 31, 1996 NS NS BDL
November 5, 1996 NS NS BDL
November 19, 1996 NS NS BDL
December 17, 1996 NS NS BDL
January 2, 1997 NS NS BDL
May 21, 1995 NS NS BDL
June 5, 1997 BDL BDL BDL
July 8, 1997 BDL BDL BDL
July 22, 1997 NS NS BDL
August 7, 1997 BDL BDL BDL
August 21, 1997 NS NS BDL
September 9, 1997 NS NS BDL
September 23, 1997 NS NS BDL
October 7, 1997 NS NS BDL
October 21, 1997 NS NS BDL
November 6, 1997 BDL BDL BDL
November 20, 1997 NS NS BDL
December 4, 1997 NS NS BDL
December 16, 1997 NS NS BDL

Legend

NS - Not Sampled
BDL - Below Laboratory Detection Limit of 1 µg/L



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