Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to site content

PUBLIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT

MARINE CORPS LOGISTICS BASE
ALBANY, DOUGHERTY COUNTY, GEORGIA


TABLES

TABLE 1. Evaluation of Potential Public Health Hazards Associated With the Operable Units at MCLB, Albany, Georgia

Site Site Description/Waste Disposal History Investigation Results/ Environmental Monitoring Results Current Status Evaluation of Public Health Hazard

Operable Unit (OU) 1

Potential Source of Contamination
(PSC) 1
(East Disposal Area)
This approximately 100 foot by 300 foot area was used between 1958 and 1959 as a landfill for general refuse (e.g., solvents, paints, and thinners) and for open burning. Surface Soil: Low levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and some pesticides, primarily in the subsurface soil, at levels below ATSDR's comparison values (CVs). Soil samples collected during the 1986 Initial Assessment Study and again from 1992 through 1995 as part of the OU 1 RI/BRA showed only very low levels of VOCs compounds and some pesticides, primarily in the subsurface soil. No remedial action was required at the site. No public health hazard is associated with the PSC because only low levels of contaminants were detected and the PSC is generally inaccessible to the public.
PSC 2
(Rubble Disposal Area)
From the mid-1950s to the late 1970s, this approximately 400 foot by 800 foot area was used as a landfillfor construction rubble and for open burning. Also, 300 drums of solvents, thinners and paints were stored in this area. Surface Soil: Low levels of SVOCs and pesticides were detected in one isolated area of PSC 2. (See PSC 1) (See PSC 1)
PSC 3
(Long Term Landfill)
Used for a general refuse landfill and for open burning, this approximately 38-acre area was operated from the mid-1950s to 1988. Surface Soil: Pesticides and PCBs were detected at levels below ATSDR CVs. In 1994, an Interim Corrective Measure ROD included excavation and a pump and treat system as remedial measures to be taken.

In May, 1996 contaminated sludge piles from the surface of the former landfill at PSC 3 were removed and disposed of off-base, and institutional controls (e.g., new landfill soil cover) were implemented to comply with EPA regulatory standards. In August 1997 a final ROD was released for OU 1.

No public health hazard is associated with the PSC because only low levels of contaminants were detected and the PSC is generally inaccessible to the public. Furthermore, sludge piles have been removed from the site, and a clean soil cover was placed over the landfill.
PSC 26
(Containment Berm Area)
This 29-acre area was used as a disposal area between 1957 and 1964. Surface Soil: Elevated levels of iron and manganese. Institutional controls were also implemented for PSC 26, primarily to mitigate the potential exposure to iron and manganese identified in soil. These controls include land-use restrictions and restriction of access to the property surrounding PSC 26. No public health hazards are associated with the site because most contaminants were detected at relatively low levels and PSC is generally inaccessible to the public.
OU 2
PSC 11
(Small Bore and Pistol Range Site)
During the 1960s, this approximately 300 foot to 500 foot area was reportedly used as a landfill for munitions, spent chlorine gas cylinders, acids, solvents, and soil sterilants. Surface Soil: Contaminants were detected at levels below ATSDR's CVs. Excavation and sampling results collected during the Confirmation Study in 1987 and the Remedial Investigation in 1991 did not reveal any elevated levels of any contaminants in surface soil and no other sources of contamination were identified. No public health hazard is associated with the site because only low levels of contaminants were detected and the PSC is generally inaccessible to the public.

OU 3

PSC 16
Building 7100 PCB Area
This area formerly housed transformers, some of which leaked polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to surrounding soil. Surface Soil: PCBs were detected at levels above ATSDR's CVs in subsurface soil. SVOCs and pesticides were detected in subsurface soil at levels below ATSDR's CVs. At PSC 16, soil sampling and analysis conducted in 1990 confirmed the presence of PCBs and SVOCs in soil beneath the former transformer pad. A 1992 interim remedial action ROD for OU 3 and a 1997 OU 3 ROD outlined the remedial actions to be taken. The base removed the soil at PSC 16 to a depth of 44 inches, disposed the soil off base, and then covered the excavated area with clean soil. In addition to the excavation of contaminated soil, other remedial measures included installation of a multilayer cap, reinstallation of security fencing, and an institutional control plan to restrict access. No public health hazard is associated with the site because remedial measures have been taken and because the PSC is generally inaccessible to the public.
PSC 17
(Depot Maintenance Activity Chrome Area (DMA) Near Building 2200
PSC 17 was used for disposal of chrome. Surface Soil: Chromium and lead were detected at levels above ATSDR's CVs or EPA's action levels. A release of chrome plating waste to the surrounding soil occurred in 1989. In 1990 and 1991, soil sampling indicated that the spill area was contaminated with chromium and lead. The MCLB, Albany, removed contaminated soil from PSC 17 to an off-base disposal facility. The excavated area was filled with clean soil from off-base sources. No public health hazard is associated with the PSC site because the area is generally inaccessible to the public and the contaminated soil has been removed.

OU 4

PSC 6
(Industrial Drainage Area)
From 1952 to 1977, PSC 6 consisted of the industrial discharge drainage ditch that ran from the Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant (IWTP) to the Marine Canal, and the sanitary sewer line that ran from the IWTP to the Domestic Wastewater Treatment Plant (DWTP). The storm sewer outfall received metal plating solutions and stripping wastes. Surface Soil: One VOC, 2 SVOCs, and pesticides were detected at levels below ATSDR's CVs. Land-use controls have been instituted at PSC 6. Physical access to the property surrounding PSC 6 is controlled by base security measures, including fencing, pass and identification procedures, guardhouse, and periodic security patrols. No public health hazard is associated with the PSC because land-use controls limit access to areas of potential soil contamination.
PSC 10
(Building 2200 Site-Central Repair Division)
PSC 10 (DMA) consists of several buildings and maintenance areas, all involved in the maintenance and refurbishment of military vehicles. Activities at this PSC included stripping and cleaning metals parts with alkaline and acid cleaning compounds. Soil: Very low levels of VOCs and SVOCs were detected at levels below ATSDR's CVs. The entire 45-acre area is fenced, and access is restricted. PSC 22 (DMA Old 90-Day Storage Area) is located within the fenced area of the DMA (PSC 10) along its southwest side. No treatment, containment, or restricted access has been implemented for PSCs 10, 12, 13, and 22. No public health hazard is associated with the site because concrete covers limit contact with potentially contaminated soil.
PSC 12 (Industrial Waste water Treatment Plant Sludge Drying Beds) In 1977, the IWTP consisting of unlined sludge drying beds, was constructed and in operation, treating the waste stream for metals and pH stabilization. Soil: Very low levels of VOCs, SVOCs, and pesticides were detected at levels below ATSDR's CVs. No treatment, containment, or restricted access has been implemented for PSCs 10, 12, 13, and 22. (see PSC 10)
PSC 13
Industrial
(Wastewater Treatment Plant [IWTP] pipeline)
The pipeline was used to transport metal finishing waste water from the DMA to the IWTP. Spills to surrounding soil have occurred. Soil: Low levels of VOCs, SVOCs, pesticides, and PCBs were detected at levels below ATSDR's CVs. (see PSC 10) (see PSC 10)
PSC 22
(DMA Storage Facility)
The DMA storage facility is located within the fenced area of the DMA (PSC 10) along its southwest side. PSC 22 consists of a metal-fabricated roofed shed approximately 30 feet by 180 feet in dimension. The sides of the shed are not enclosed; however, access is limited by a chain-link fence fixed to the pillars of the roof. Soil: Low levels of VOCs, SVOCs, pesticides, and PCBs were detected at levels below ATSDR's CVs. (see PSC 10) (see PSC 10)

OU 5

PSC 8
(Grit Disposal Area)
Between 1962 and 1979, this 40 foot by 50 foot area was used to landfill materials such as sand, broken glass, nuts, bolts and other non-biodegradable materials. Surface Soil: VOCs and pesticides were detected at levels below ATSDR's CVs. In 1995, an Interim Remedial Action ROD indicated that excavation would be the recommended remedial action to be taken for PSC 8. In January, 1996, contaminated materials were excavated from the site and transported to an off-base disposal site. The excavated area was replaced with clean soil and subsequent soil testing did not show any contaminants to be above CVs. No public health hazard is associated with the site because the area is generally inaccessible to the public and contaminated material has been excavated and transported to an off-base disposal site.
PSC 14 (Domestic Wastewater Treatment Plant [DWTP]) PSC 14 is a grassy, open 5-acre site surrounded by pecan groves in the southwestern portion of the base. The DWTP operated from 1952 to 1990 for treating sanitary and pretreated industrial wastes generated at MCLB, Albany. Surface Soil: SVOCs, pesticides, and PCBs were detected at levels below ATSDR's CVs. In 1991, six sludge drying beds at PSC 14 were removed and no further remedial action has been taken at this PSC. This remediation was followed by additional soil sampling to ensure that contaminant levels were close to background concentrations found at nearby locations that were not impacted. The soils around pecan orchards were also sampled and found to be clean. No public health hazards are associated with the site because the area is generally inaccessible to the public and contaminated material has been excavated and transported to an off-base disposal site.

OU 6

Base-wide Groundwater Seven VOC groundwater plumes have been identified on base; five plumes within the upper water bearing zone (UWBZ) of the Upper Floridan aquifer (UFA) and two plumes within the lower water bearing zone (LWBZ) of the UFA. Groundwater: VOCs and metals were detected at levels above CVs. Additional information is provided in Table 3. An RI/BRA for the base-wide groundwater OU 6 was completed in November 1998. Additional monitoring and further delineation of the groundwater plumes that have not been fully characterized is continuing. Contaminant levels in groundwater beneath MCLB, Albany, exceed ATSDR's CVs, but no harmful exposure has occurred or is likely to occur because:
Base-wide Groundwater
(Continued)
Much of the contamination resulted from disposal of waste solvents in trench-and-fill operations at uncapped landfills located at PSC 1, PSC 3, PSC 4, PSC 26, and spills at the DMA area. See Table 3. Additional monitoring wells have been installed north of MCLB, Albany, to evaluate potential off-base migration of contaminants from the base.

Additional monitoring wells have been installed south of the DMA plumes.

1) drinking water on base is not taken from areas of contamination, 2) long-term monitoring is in place to monitor contaminant migration, 3) future groundwater use is restricted, and 4) as a precautionary measure, MCLB, Albany, has connected most nearby private well owners, north of the base, to the municipal water supply. 5) Further analyses of private well water in the Fleming Road area, southwest of MCLB, is needed.
Sources: ABB, 1996, 1997a, 1997b, 1997c, 1999

Key:

BRA baseline risk assessment
CVs ATSDR's comparison values
DMA Depot Maintenance Activity
DWTP Domestic Waste Water Treatment Plant
FS feasibility study
IWTP Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant
LWBZ lower water bearing zone
OU operable unit
PCBs polychlorinated biphenyls
PSC potential source of contamination
RI remedial investigation
SVOCs semivolatile organic compounds
UFA Upper Floridan aquifer
UWBZ upper water bearing zone
VOCs volatile organic compounds


TABLE 2. Exposure Pathways

Pathway
Name
Source of
Contamination
Environmental Medium Point of Exposure Route of Exposure Potentially Exposed Population Comments

Completed and Potential Exposure Pathways

Off-base private drinking water wells Contaminated groundwater from MCLB, Albany, is a potential source of contamination for private wells. Groundwater Local private wells Ingestion, dermal contact, and inhalation A completed exposure pathway for some residents living in the Ramsey Road (Block 212) area.

A potential exposure pathway for private well users north and south of the base.

Past:
• Low levels of VOCs were detected, below ATSDR's health-based CVs, in a few private wells located to the north of the base. Exposure in the past to these low levels of VOCs was not likely to result in harmful effects.

Current and Future:
• Currently, groundwater data indicate that harmful exposures have not occurred. Future exposures are unlikely because most residences in the Ramsey Road area are connected to the municipal water supply. However, groundwater monitoring is continuing so that the extent of contamination in all plumes can be delineated. Further analyses of private well water contamination in the Fleming Road area, southwest of MCLB, is needed.

Surface soil Waste disposal activities at MCLB, Albany. Surface soil Areas designated as potential sources of contamination (PSCs) at MCLB, Albany. Dermal contact Children Past:
• The entire base is fenced, thereby preventing access to trespassers. Children living on base would not likely be exposed to contaminated soil because contaminated areas are either fenced in or are located in areas where children do not play or spend time.

Current and Future:
• Remedial measures have removed most contaminated surface soil, and interim controls and restricted access makes it unlikely for exposures to be taking place or to take place in the future.


TABLE 3. Summary of Contaminants Detected Above ATSDR's CVs in Groundwater Monitoring Wells Between 1992 and 2000

Contaminant

Contaminant Concentration Range (ppb) and Frequency of Detections

Comparison Value (CVs) (ppb)

UWBZ LWBZ

CV

Source

VOCs
1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane
1,1-Dichloroethylene
1,2-Dichloroethane
1,2-Dichloroethylene (tot)
1,2-Dichloroethylene (cis)
1,2-Dichloropropane
Benzene
Carbon tetrachloride
Chloroform
Chloromethane
Methylene chloride
Tetrachloroethylene
Trichloroethylene
Vinyl chloride
0.5- 3
0.6 - 630
1 - 32
0.4 - 7,600
0.4 - 6,940
3 - 11
1 - 1,500
1 - 640
0.2 - 55
2 - 11
0.4 - 2,700
0.4 - 410
2 - 8,700
0.4 - 900
5/351
43/316
6/381
190/349
217/308
5/310
32/506
33/440
80/579
14/475
43/741
90/658
449/751
48/741
1
3
0.4
0.5 - 260
0.6 - 260


1.3-29
2.3 - 7.4
3.0
0.4 - 45
0.4 - 58
2 - 330
2/75
1/34
1/25
34/104
35/102


17/110
11/102
1/8
9/53
12/59
47/132
0.2
0.06
0.4
55
70
5
0.6
0.3
6
2.1
5
5
5
0.03
CREG
CREG
CREG
RBC
MCL
MCL
CREG
CREG
CREG
RBC
CREG
MCL
MCL
CREG
SVOCs
Pentachlorophenol
bis(2-Chloroethyl)ether
bis(2-Ethylhexyl)phthalate
1 - 4
26 - 29
1 - 150
2/343
3/189
72/349
 
 
2 - 14
 
 
11/34
0.3
0.03
4.8
CREG
CREG
RBC
Pesticides&PCBs      
4,4'-DDE
Dieldrin
Heptachlor
Heptachlor Epoxide
Arochlor 1242
0.24 - 0.24
0.036
2/254
1/53
0.02 - 0.1
0.01 - 0.03
1.3
3/10
2/10
1/7
0.1
0.002
0.008
0.004
0.03
CREG
CREG
CREG
CREG
RBC
Metals      
Aluminum
Antimony
Arsenic
Beryllium
Cadmium
Chromium
Iron
Lead
Manganese
Mercury
Nickel
Thallium
Vanadium
32.6 - 123,000
2.2 - 47.8
0.5 - 9.9.6
0.14 - 16.6
0.22 - 37.8
0.8 - 371
19.2 - 455,000
0.5 - 91.9
1.4 - 11,600
0 - 9.6
1.5 - 7,730
0.7 - 116
0.56 - 1,020
362/395
79/418
77/417
196/420
136/422
284/422
396/422
236/422
382/393
102/397
131/422
23/417
355/395

16.6
1.4 - 3.6

0.3 - 12.9

35 - 60,800
1.8 - 42.3
1.8 - 1,370


6.5-8.8
1.5 - 186

3/49
5/43

12/52

37/62
13/51
29/58


8/60
34/40
37,000
6
0.02
4
5
100
11,000
15
500/2000(c/a)
2
700
2
30/100(c/a)
RBC
MCL
CREG
MCL
MCL
MCL
RBC
action level
RMEG
MCL
RMEG
MCL
IEMEG
Sources: HLA 1998; 1999; Harding ESE, Inc 2000.

Key: ppb = parts per billion; UWBZ = Upper Water Bearing Zone; LWBZ = Lower Water Bearing Zone; (c/a) = comparison value for child and for adult; CREG = cancer risk evaluation guide; CEMEG = chronic environmental media evaluation guide; action level = EPAs action level; IEMEG = intermediate environmental media evaluation guide; RMEG = reference media evaluation guide; RBC = risk-based concentration; VOC=volatile organic compounds; SVOCs= semi-volatile organic compounds; DDE= (1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene); MCL= maximum contaminant level.


TABLE 4. Summary of Contaminants in Off-base Private Wells North of MCLB, Albany

Contaminant Maximum Concentration Detected (ppb) for each year analyzed Frequency of Detections Above ATSDR's Comparison Values Comparison Values (ppb) and Source
1,2-Dichloroethylene (cis)* 2.9
0/61 70 MCL
1.5 0/62
1.0 0/313
2.6 0/304
Trichloroethylene* 2.1
0/61 5 MCL
1.2 0/62
0.9 0/313
1.8 0/304
Methylene chloride 5.8
1/6 2 5 CREG
ND 0/30 4
Lead 2.7 0/6 1
15 EPA action level
ND 0/6 2
17 2/31 3
ND 0/304
Aldrin ND
0/313 0.002 CREG
0.029 4/30 4
Dieldrin 0.026
5/31 3 0.002 CREG
0.19 4/30 4
Heptachlor ND
0/313 0.008 CREG
0.067 3/30 4
Heptachlor epoxide 0.025
2/31 3 0.004 CREG
0.043 5/30 4
PCB
(Arochlor 1242)
0.25
1/31 3 0.03 RBC
ND 0/30 4
0.40 1/5 5
bis (2-Ethylhexyl)
phthalate
15 1/30 4 6 MCL
Source: EPA, 1993, 1994, 1998, 1999a.
1 The samples were collected in November 1993
2 The samples were collected in April 1994
3 The samples were collected in August 1998
4 The samples were collected in January 1999
5 The samples were collected in April 1999

Key: ppb = parts per billion; CREG = ATSDR's cancer risk evaluation guide; RBC = EPA's risk based concentration; MCL = EPA's maximum contaminant level; PCB= polychlorinated biphenyl. * These VOCs were detected in three wells in the Ramsey Road neighborhood just north of the base.


Table 5. Summary of Public Health Hazard Categories

CONCLUSION CATEGORY* SITUATIONS/SITES
No Public Health Hazard A. Exposures to soil contaminants at MCLB, Albany.
No Apparent Public Health Hazards B. Exposures to groundwater from the three on-base drinking water supply wells.

C. Exposures to surface water at MCLB, Albany.

D. Exposures to freshwater fish at MCLB, Albany.

E. Exposures to groundwater from private drinking water wells in the Ramsey Road neighborhood.

Indeterminate Public Health Hazard F. Exposures to groundwater from private drinking water wells in the residential area located near Fleming. Road south of MCLB, Albany.
* See ATSDR glossary (Appendix A) for definition of each hazard category


FIGURES

MCLB, Albany, Georgia, Area Map
Figure 1. MCLB, Albany, Georgia, Area Map

Demographics Statistics Map
Figure 2. Demographics Statistics Map

MCLB, Albany Georgia, Site Map
Figure 3. MCLB, Albany Georgia, Site Map

Residential Areas Around MCLB, Albany, Georgia
Figure 4. Residential Areas Around MCLB, Albany, Georgia

ATSDR's Exposure Evaluation Process
Figure 5. ATSDR's Exposure Evaluation Process

Conceptual Groundwater Flow Model
Figure 6. Conceptual Groundwater Flow Model

Locations of Contaminated Groundwater Plumes at MCLB, Albany, Georgia
Figure 7. Locations of Contaminated Groundwater Plumes at MCLB, Albany, Georgia


Next Section     Table of Contents

  
 
USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, 4770 Buford Hwy NE, Atlanta, GA 30341
Contact CDC: 800-232-4636 / TTY: 888-232-6348

A-Z Index

  1. A
  2. B
  3. C
  4. D
  5. E
  6. F
  7. G
  8. H
  9. I
  10. J
  11. K
  12. L
  13. M
  14. N
  15. O
  16. P
  17. Q
  18. R
  19. S
  20. T
  21. U
  22. V
  23. W
  24. X
  25. Y
  26. Z
  27. #