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PETITIONED PUBLIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT

NEWTOWN COMMUNITY
GAINESVILLE, HALL COUNTY, GEORGIA


APPENDICES

APPENDIX A: AREA MAPS

TRI Facility Locations Around the Newtown Community
TRI Facility Locations Around the Newtown Community

TRI Facility Locations Around the Newtown Community
TRI Facility Locations Around the Newtown Community


APPENDIX B: DEMOGRAPHICS

Demographics Map
Demographics Map

Age Distribution in Newtown
Figure 1. Age Distribution in Newtown

Table 1. Black Group and County Age Group Data, 1998 Projection*

Age Group Block Group 2 Population % of total Block Group 2 Pop. County Population % of Total County Pop.
Less than 6 years 60 7.3% 10,186 8.6%
6-17 years 115 14% 20,088 17%
18-24 years 44 5.4% 11,305 9.5%
25-34 years 125 15.3% 17,577 14.8%
35-44 years 108 13.2% 18,918 16%
45-54 years 108 13.2% 15,944 13.5%
55-64 years 80 9.8% 10,139 8.6%
65+ years 179 21.8% 14,222 12%
*Data for this table were generated by the Compass program, with PRIZM applications


APPENDIX C: AEROMETRIC INFORMATION RETRIEVAL SYSTEM AND TOXICOLOGY RESOURCE INDEX DATA INFORMATION

Aerometric Information Retrieval System Facility Subsystem (http://www.epa.gov/enviro/html/air.html )

Information on air releases is contained in the Aerometric Information Retrieval System (AIRS), a computer-based repository for information about air pollution in the United States. This information comes from source reports by various stationary sources of air pollution, such as electric power plants, steel mills, factories, and universities, and provides information about the air pollutants they produce. In AIRS, these sources are known as facilities, and the part of AIRS associated with data about sources is called the AIRS Facility Subsystem, or AFS. The information in AFS is used by the states to prepare State Implementation Plans, to track the compliance status of point sources (locations) with various regulatory programs, and to report air emissions estimates for pollutants regulated under the Clean Air Act.

Environmental facts on air release information specifically relates to industrial plants and their components (stacks, points, and segments). This data provides valuable information not only about the industrial facilities, but about the chemicals they introduce into your local air. There is information available on managing operating permit application and renewals.

AIRS contains both emissions and compliance data on air pollution point sources regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and/or state and local air regulatory agencies. AFS contains data on industrial plants and their components: stacks, the points at which emissions are introduced into the atmosphere; points, the emission point or process within a plant that produces the pollutant emissions; and segments, which are components of the processes that produce emissions.

AIRS data reports do not include all point source (locations) that are subject to EPA regulations governing air pollutant emissions. AIRS data includes about 10,000 sources for which state environmental agencies have compiled air pollutant emissions inventories and stored that information in EPA's AIRS database. Approximately 30,000 additional major sources governed by EPA regulations are omitted from AIRS data because air pollutant emissions estimates are not available in AIRS.

Furthermore, AIRS data does not include estimates of air pollutant emissions from mobile or area sources. Mobile sources encompass just about everything that has an engine and moves -- cars, trucks, buses, airplanes, boats, lawn mowers, and so on. Area sources are small point sources, such as residential furnaces and fireplaces, and diffuse sources, such as dirt roads and forests. (Some forests are prodigious sources of volatile organic compounds.) Since these source types are not in the AIRS database, they are not in AIRS data, either.

Table 1. AIRS Database- Facilities Determined to be Significant Sources of Emissions1

  EPA FACILITY ID PLANT NAME STREET ADDRESS CITY NAME STACKS 2 POINTS 3
1 GAD114452113 BENJAMIN BLATT 2100 ATLANTA HWY GAINESVILLE 4 5
2 GAD096634985 CARGILL P.O. BOX 1298 GAINESVILLE 2 2
3 GAD000865600 GAINESVILLE FLAT CREEK WPCP 2641 OLD FLOWERY BRANCH RD. GAINESVILLE 2 2
4 GAD984282665 GEORGIA DEPT OF TRANSPORTATION BOX 1057 US 129 E GAINESVILLE 1 1
5 GAD000821843 MILLIKEN & CO NEW HOLLAND MILL 1750 JESSE JEWELL PKWY GAINESVILLE 1 1
6 GA0001420454 MITCHELL CONST CO 1393 CANDLER RD. GAINESVILLE 1 1
7 GAD980709604 MORENO PRESS 3915 OLD MUNDY MILL ROAD OAKWOOD 2 3
8 GAD033724923 PHILYAW T A CO INC WHITE SULFUR RD. GAINESVILLE 1 1
9 GA0001420520 PITTMAN CONSTRUCTION CO 4195 FRIENDSHIP RD BUFORD 1 1
10 GA0001420413 SHEPHERD CONST 619 STATE HWY 60 EAST CANDLER 1 1

Bolded facilities are within 4 miles of the Newtown Community

1 By Environmental Protection Agency, Total Number of Facilities Displayed: 10 of 106 results. These facilities are considered significant sources of industrial emissions by the US EPA and the Ga EPD.
2 Stacks:Indicates the number of stacks monitored within a facility.
3 Points: Indicates the number of points monitored within a facility.

Toxicology Resource Inventory Facility Data
http://www.epa.gov/opptintr/cbep/actlocal/tri-nord.htm

The Toxicology Resource Inventory (TRI) contains information from companies and government facilities that meet the requirements listed below:

  • ten or more full-time employees;
  • manufactures goods in the industries listed under Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) Codes 20-39; starting with the 1998 reporting year these additional categories: metal mining, coal mining, electric generating utilities that combust coal and/or oil, chemical wholesalers, petroleum bulk plants and terminals, commercial hazardous waste treatment facilities and solvent recyclers; and
  • manufactures, imports, or processes more than 25,000 pounds per year of one or more of listed toxic chemicals, or uses more than 10,000 pounds of one or more of listed toxic chemicals (long form criteria); or
  • manufactures, imports, or processes more than one million pounds per year of one or more of the listed toxic chemicals, but does not exceed 500 pounds for the total annual reportable amount (short form criteria).

For each facility that meets these requirements, the facility must report:

  • facility name, location, and type of business; name of a public contact person for the facility; and certification that the

For each chemical that the facility reports, the following must be provided:

  • how the chemical was used (manufactured, processed, or otherwise used);
  • how much was intentionally or accidentally released to the air, water, or land;
  • how much of the chemical was treated, recycled, or combusted for energy recovery at the facility;
  • how chemical wastes were treated at the facility and the treatment efficiency;
  • how much waste was sent off-site for treatment, disposal, recycling, or energy recovery;
  • where the waste was sent off-site; and
  • pollution prevention and chemical recycling activities.

TRI also contains some information about source reduction efforts. Since 1987, data has been collected for more than 300 chemicals that EPA considers toxic. In 1995, 286 additional chemicals were included on the list. Beginning with the 1994 reporting year, federal facilities are required to report TRI chemical releases. Companies and government facilities provide the TRI information annually to EPA.

Table 2. Toxic Release Inventory Sites 1987-19981 for Hall County, Gainesville, Georgia

Num Facility ID Facility Name Street City Standard Industrial Classification Code Standard Industrial Classification Code Description Closed?
1 GAD981238199 Caradon Indalex 2905 Old Oakwood Rd. Gainesville 3354 Aluminum Extruded Products N
2 GAD096634985 Cargill Inc. 862 W. Ridge Rd. Gainesville 2075 Soybean Oil Mills N
3 GAD114452113 Benjamin Blatt and Chicopee Inc.

(Became Johnson & Johnson Advanced Materials Co.)

21OO Atlanta Hwy. PO Box 8029 Blackshew Pl. Rd. Gainesville 3081 Unsupported Plastics Film and Sheet N
4 GAD984280016 Conagra Broiler Co. 949 Industrial Blvd. Gainesville 2015 Poultry Slaughtering and Processing N
5 GAD981218332 Conagra Broiler Co. 979 Moreno St. Gainesville 2048 Prepared Feeds and Feed Ingredients for Animals and Fowls, Except Dogs and Cats N
6 GAD061441945 Continental Grain Wayne Farms Div. Wayne Poultry Rd. Pendergrass 2015 Poultry Slaughtering and Processing N
7 GAD984274878 Continental Grain Wayne Farms 875 Indl. Blvd. Gainesville 2048 Prepared Feeds and Feed Ingredients for Animals and Fowls, Except Dogs and Cats N
8 GA0001298413 Deep South Prods. Inc. 2255 White Sulphur Rd. Gainesville 2033 Canned Fruits, Vegetables, Preserves, Jams, and Jellies N
9 GAD057704447 Fieldale Farms Corp. Gainesville Plant 959 Dorsey St. S.W. Gainesville 2015 Poultry Slaughtering and Processing N
10 GAD984280073 Fieldale Farms Corp. Queen City Foods 1540 Monroe Dr. Gainesville 2015 Poultry Slaughtering and Processing N
11 GAD003278249 Georgia Chair Co. 456 Industrial Blvd. Gainesville 2531 Public Building and Related Furniture N
12 GAD115319204 Lincoln Electric Co. Harris Calorific Div. 2345 Murphy Blvd. Gainesville 3548 Electric and Gas Welding and Soldering Equipment N
13 GAD984296863 Macklanburg Duncan Co. 2095 Memorial Park Rd. Gainesville 3354 Aluminum Extruded Products N
14 GAD000821843 Milliken and New Holland Plant 1750 Jesse Jewel Pky. Gainesville 2281 Yarn Spinning Mills N
15 GAD981216138 Peachtree Doors Inc. 2744 Ramsey Rd. Gainesville 3442 Metal Doors, Sash, Frames, Molding, and Trim N
16 GAD131327546 Piedmont Labs. Inc. 2030 Old Candler Rd. Gainesville 2841 Soap and Other Detergents, Except Specialty Cleaners N
17 GAD046893822 Prestolite Electric Inc. Leece-Neville Div. 989 Athens St. S.E. Gainesville 3694 Electrical Equipment for Internal Combustion Engines Y
18 GAD984274902 Purina Mills Inc. 1125 Purina Dr. S.E. Gainesville 2048 Prepared Feeds and Feed Ingredients for Animals and Fowls, Except Dogs and Cats N
19 GAD981226541 Teledyne CAE Gainesville Div. 1215 Palmour Dr. Gainesville 3764 Guided Missile and Space Vehicle Propulsion Units and Propulsion Unit Parts N
20 GAD980709604 World Color, Dittler Divis, Oakwood Factory, formerly Dittler Brothers Inc. Oakwood Div. 3915 Old Mundy Mill Rd. Oakwood 2752 Commercial Printing, Lithographic N

1The 20 facilities listed in this Table released more than 500 pounds during the study period. They were selected by ATSDR from a total of 39 facilities listed in the EPA TRI database.


APPENDIX D: ATSDR DISPERSION MODEL

The Industrial Source Complex, Version 3 Short Term Model (ISC3ST) model was used. The ISC3ST model was run via a commercial interface called BREEZE ISC SUITE (Version 3.2.2) made by Trinity Consultants, Inc. Besides the emission rates and stack parameters shown in Tables 1 and 2, the following parameters were used:

  • The modeling was conducted for five years and the results represent a 5 year average.
  • Flagpole receptor at 1.5 meters.
  • Urban option selected

Two sets of meteorological data were used:

  1. Atlanta Hartsfield Airport surface air data and Athens Ben Epps Airport upper air data were obtained from U.S. EPA at http://www.epa.gov/scram001/tt24.htm . Available data included the years 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, and 1991.

  2. Gainesville Gilmer Memorial Airport surface air data and Peachtree City Falcon Field upper air data were obtained from the National Climatic Data Center, National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov ) for years the years 1998 through 2000. Missing data within these years were filled with values as specified in guidance from U.S. EPA [86]. When specification in the guidance for filling missing data could not be met, ATSDR assumed worst case conditions that would result in higher concentrations at ground level. The data collected at the Gilmer Memorial Airport were collected from an Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) meteorological station. These stations replace conventional human observations for recording near-surface weather conditions. The ASOS system lacks the observational ability of the human observer to spatially integrate some of the weather elements over a large area. Two such elements are ceiling height and opaque cloud cover, which are important in estimating atmospheric stability and mixing heights required for applications of several regulatory and nonregulatory dispersion models. The effects of these changes on model results (including the ISC3ST model) has been explored by EPA [87]. In summary, they found that concentrations are higher using ASOS data versus human observed data with the differences, in part, due to the 12,000 foot ceiling height measurement of ASOS. In the case of Gainesville, ATSDR feels that ceiling height was probably not a significant factor although the concentrations in the Newtown Community were slightly higher when using the human observed data collected at the Atlanta airport versus the ASOS collected data in Gainesville. A direct comparison between these two meteorological stations and the two different data collection methods was not possible because Atlanta airport data is now collected by ASOS and there is no overlap in years with data collected by human observation at the Atlanta airport and data collected by ASOS in Gainesville. The Atlanta airport data were from the years 1984 through 1992 and Gainesville data were from the years 1997 through 2000. The Atlanta airport started collecting data using ASOS in 1995.

Model Uncertainty. ISC3ST model uncertainty has been discussed elsewhere [88]. For flat terrain and receptors located within 10 kilometers (6.2 miles), the ratio of the predicted (P) to observed (O) values ranged between 0.5 to 2 (i.e. P/O is between ½ and 2) with probability 0.90. ATSDR's comparison of model to monitored results was within this range for those compounds not from mobile sources or from long distance transport (see Page D-7).

Table 1. List of Facilities and Amount of Emissions Modeled by ATSDR

Facility Chemical Release Rate (pounds/year) Year of Release
Benjamin Blatt/Chicopee Inc./Johnson & Johnson Advanced Materials Co. 1,1,1-Trichloroethane
Xylenes
12000
41318
1987
1994
Caradon Indalex Ethylbenzene
Methylene chloride
Methylethyl ketone
Xylenes
8080
6600
13330
100958
1990
1990
1993
1993
Cargill Hexane 1,263,200 1983
Conagra Poultry Co. Ammonia
Arsenic
35000
2100
1991,
1987, 1988, 1989
Continental Grain/Wayne Farms Div. Ammonia 15948 1994
Deep South Product, Inc. Ammonia 13,700 1993
Fielddale Farms Corp., Gainesville Plant Chlorine
Ammonia
53300
44820
1990
1992
Georgia Chair Company Cumene
Ethylbenzene
Formaldehyde
Glycol Ether
Lead
Methylethyl ketone
Methylisobutyl ketone
Methanol
Toluene
Vinyl acetate
Xylene
40
1400
80
1000
2.4
34400
8400
460
83600
280
66000
1996
1996
1996
1996
1996
1996
1996
1996
1996
1996
1996
Lincoln Electric/Harris Calorific 1,1,1-Trichloroethane 72,543 1987
Macklanburg-Duncan Co. Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate
Nitric acid
Sulfuric acid
999
10795
16367
1992, 1993
1993, 1994
1993
Milliken & Co., New Holland Plant Methanol 192800 1996
Peachtree Doors and Windows 1,1,1-Trichloroethane 27050 1992
Piedmont Labs Inc. 1,1,1-Trichloroethane
Methylene chloride
Glycol ether
Methanol
Toluene
Xylene mixed
1782
2420
2831
8498
1222
1239
1991
1994
1991
1991
1991
1991
Prestolite Electric Inc., Leece-Neville Div. 1,1,1-Trichloroethane
Freon
Toluene
Xylenes
4801
11871
10058
16290
1991
1991
1987
1989
Purina Mills Copper
Manganese
Zinc
20
509
509
1992-4
1990-4
1991-3
Teledyne CAE, Gainesville Division 1,1,1-Trichloroethane
Freon
13,413
39,671
1989
1988
World Color, Dittler Division, Oakwood Factory/Moreno Press 1,1,1-Trichloroethane
Cyclohexane
Glycol ethers
Methylethyl ketone
Toluene
490205
900
43500
20888
5000
1988
1994
1993
1990
1994

1 EPA TRI= Environmental Protection Agency Toxic Release Inventory


Table 2. List of Facilities and Stack Parameters used in ATSDR Model

Company Point Source Parameters Source/Note
Stack Height
(meters)
Temperature of Exit Gas
(degrees Kelvin)
Diameter of Stack at Exit
(meters)
Exit Gas Velocity
(meters/second)
Caradon Indalex 6.1 293 1.00 0.10 1
Cargill
Stack No. 14
Stack No. 15
Stack No. 30
Stack No. 31
Stack No. 32
 
3.35
3.65
27.43
14.3
1
 
366
327
300
300
305.37
 
20.27
22.58
12.12
17.55
0.0091
 
0.54
0.814
0.866
0.506
11.51
 
2
Benjamin Blatt/Chicopee Inc./Johnson & Johnson Advanced Materials Co. 6.1 293 1.00 0.10 2
Conagra Poultry Co. 6.1 293 1.00 0.10 1
Continental Grain/Wayne Farms Div. 6.1 293 1.00 0.10 2
Deep South Product, Inc. 6.1 293 1.00 0.10 2
World Color, Dittler Division, Oakwood Factory/Moreno Press
Stack No. 1
Stack No. 2
 
 
12.8
10.7
 
 
450
422
 
 
0.49
1.16

 
 
41652.40
45.0

 
 
2
Fielddale Farms 6.1 293 3.80 0.10 1
Georgia Chair Company
Stack No. S1
Stack No. S2
Stack No. S3
Stack No. S4
Stack No. S5
Stack No. S6
Stack No. S7
Stack No. S8
Stack No. S10
Stack No. S11
Stack No. S12
Stack No. GP
 
3.96
9.45
9.45
1.22
7.62
3.96
7.62
13.7
13.7
10.7
10.7
1.22
 
298
298
298
298
298
298
298
298
298
298
298
298
 
0.6096
0.6096
0.6096
0.6096
0.6096
0.6096
0.6096
3.66
0.457
0.457
0.6096
0.6096
 
0.10
0.10
0.10
0.10
0.10
0.10
0.10
0.10
0.10
0.10
0.10
0.10
 
2
Lincoln Electric/Harris Calorific 6.1 293 1.00 0.10 1
Macklanberg-Duncan Co. 6.1 293 1.00 0.10 1
Milliken & Co., New New Holland Plant
Stack No. SL1
Stack No. SL2
Stack No. SL3
Stack No. SL4
 
9.14
9.14
9.14
9.14
 
336
336
336
336
 
0.799
0.914
0.799
0.799
 
12.7
9.7
12.7
12.7
 
2
Peachtree Doors and Windows 6.1 293 1.00 0.10 2
Piedmont Labs Inc. 6.1 293 1.00 0.10 1
Prestolite Electric Inc., Leece-Neville Div. 6.1 293 1.00 0.10 1
Purina Mills 6.1 293 1.00 0.10 4
Teledyne CAE, Gainesville Division 6.1 293 1.00 0.10 1

Table 2 Notes

1. No stack data available from AIRS or EPD files. ATSDR then selected a set of stack values that would be indicative of fugitive emissions with a stack height from the roof of a 2-story building, a release rate that was very slow, at exit gas temperatures near ambient temperatures. These values are:

Stack Height = 6.1 meters (20 feet)
Temperature of Exit Gas = 293oK (20oC or 68oF)
Diameter of Stack at Exit = 1 meter (3.2 feet)
Exit Gas Velocity = 0.10 meters/second (0.33 feet/second)

For emissions data, ATSDR used the highest emission rates reported from the TRI database. In most cases, the emission rates for different compounds occurred in different years. For example, the TRI database reported that Benjamin Blatt/Chicopee Inc./Johnson & Johnson Advanced Materials Co. emitted 1,1,1-trichloroethane in 1987 and 1988 and emitted xylene from 1991 through 1994. The highest level of 1,1,1-trichloroethane emissions occurred in 1987 and the highest level of xylene emissions occurred in 1994. ATSDR used the highest emissions regardless of the year. This means that the modeled emissions did not represent real conditions but hypothetical worst case conditions.

2. Cargill, Georgia Chair, and Milliken & Co., New Holland Plant,
Stack data and emission rates per stack were available from the Georgia EPD Files.

For Cargill, emission rates of hexane were available for each of the 5 stacks in 1993 with the total amount of hexane released at 566.2 tons/year. According the files, 631.6 tons of hexane were released in 1983 [83]. ATSDR used this greater release amount and apportioned the 631.6 tons to each of the 5 stacks based on the proportions used for the 566.2 tons. The spatial location of the stacks at Cargill was approximated using the relative coordinates identified in the air modeling completed by Courtney Consultants, Inc (1995) and a1993 georeferenced aerial photograph obtained from www.terraserver.microsoft.com showing the buildings at Cargill.

Georgia Chair emission rates for each of its 12 stacks was available from a Toxic Impact Assessment Report completed by Georgia Chair in 1998. Georgia Chair's October 22, 1996 air permit application reported a total higher potential emission rate but this application did not include stack specific data. ATSDR apportioned the higher emission rate of the 1996 permit application to each of the stacks based on the proportions of emissions reported in the 1998 assessment. Lead which was reported in the 1996 permit was not reported in the stack specific data of the Toxic Impact Assessment Report. Therefore, lead was not included. The lead release rate of 2.4 pounds/year reported in the Toxic Impact Assessment Report is very low and not significant compared to the other emissions from Georgia Chair.

The spatial location of each stack at Georgia Chair was approximated by using the building layouts and stack locations shown in Figure 3 in the October 22, 1996 permit and a 1993 georeferenced aerial photograph obtained from www.terraserver.microsoft.com showing the buildings at Georgia Chair

Milliken & Co., New Holland Plant emission rates of methanol was obtained for each of four individual stacks. Spatial location information was not located for each individual stack so the all four stacks were released from the same location. This location was set at the closest location at the Milliken facility to the Newtown Community. From the model results presented in Section IV.A.2, the inaccuracy of this location is not important because the emissions of methanol from this facility is not significant compared the to cumulative emissions of the other facilities.

The modeled emission rates were based on the method discussed for note 1.

3. World Color, Dittler Division
Stack data was available from AIRS.The data in AIRS provided information on two stacks for World Color, Dittler Division but information on specific HAPs from each stack was not available. Furthermore, the emissions were reported as fugitive and stack emissions. ATSDR assumed all the emissions were from fugitive emissions which will give higher ground level concentrations. The modeled emission rates were based on the method discussed for note 1.

4. Purina
Physical stack parameters were available for Purina but data on emissions rates of HAPs from each stack was not available. The emissions rates were reported in the TRI data as fugitive emissions and not emitted from a stack. Therefore, ATSDR used the generic conditions used for facilities without stack information as listed in item 1. The modeled emission rates were based on the method discussed for note 1.

Table 3. Comparison of ATSDR's Modeled Results to Georgia's Air Monitoring

Chemical ATSDR Model (g/m3) Measured (µg/m3) 1 Comment
Upper Value Lower Value Mean
Arsenic 0.005991619 0.018 0.002 0.00529 Modeled concentration within range of measured
Cumene 6.13272E-06 <0.0707 <0.0707 <0.0707 The compound was detected above the sampling and analysis detection limit. ATSDR's is below the detection limit.
Ethyl Benzene 0.001723788 1.56 0.1 1.42 Mobile sources are the predominant source of this chemical. Mobile emissions were not included in the ATSDR Model.
Freon 114 0.086127831 <2.47 <2.47 <2.47 The compound was detected above the sampling and analysis detection limit. ATSDR's modeled value is below the detection limit.
Hexane 4.055856667 4.3 0.0707 2.06 Modeled concentration within range of measured
Manganese 0.005765472 0.022 0.00041 0.00914 Modeled concentration within range of measured
Methylene Chloride 0.002397039 46.9 1.2 3.5 Predominant sources of this compound are background concentrations which are sources greater than 50 km from the site and other small sources not accounted for in ATSDR's the modeling.
Toluene 0.10275417 7.2 1.2 2.46 Mobile sources are the predominant source of this chemical. Mobile emissions were not included in the ATSDR Model.
Zinc 0.005765472 0.136 0.00017 0.0427 Modeled concentration within range of measured

1 ug/m3= micrograms per cubic meter of air

Arsenic Concentrations in Air Modeled from Point Sources Using Different Meteorology
Figure 1. Arsenic Concentrations in Air Modeled from Point Sources Using Different Meteorology

Manganese Concentrations in Air Modeled from Point Sources Using Different Meteorology
Figure 2. Manganese Concentrations in Air Modeled from Point Sources Using Different Meteorology

Hexane Concentrations in Air Modeled from Point Sources Using Different Meteorology
Figure 3. Hexane Concentrations in Air Modeled from Point Sources Using Different Meteorology

Theoretical Cancer Risk From Air Emissions
Figure 4. Theoretical Cancer Risk From Air Emissions

Theoretical Noncancer Hazard Index
Figure 5. Theoretical Noncancer Hazard Index

Surface Winds in Atlanta and Gainesville, Georgia - Comparison of Wind Direction (Wind From) and Speed by Percent of Time
Figure 6. Surface Winds in Atlanta and Gainesville, Georgia - Comparison of Wind Direction (Wind From) and Speed by Percent of Time



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