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PUBLIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT

ANDREWS AIR FORCE BASE
CAMP SPRINGS, PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND


TABLES

TABLE 1.

EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEALTH HAZARDS AT ANDREWS AIR FORCE BASE
Site Site Description/Waste Disposal History Investigation Results/Environmental Monitoring Results Corrective Activities and/or Current Status Comments
Brandywine Defense Reutilization Marketing Office (DRMO) Yard Spill Site or Storage Area (SS)-01 This 8-acre remote facility is located about 8 miles southeast of Andrews Air Force Base (AFB) in Prince George's County. From 1953 to 1961, the U.S. Navy used the site for storage. In 1961, Andrews AFB acquired SS-01 and stored excess materials and hazardous wastes at the site. Groundwater: Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (primarily trichloroethylene [TCE]), semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs), one pesticide, and inorganics were detected in monitoring wells. VOCs were detected in an off-site residential well.

Surface Soil: Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and pesticides were detected. In addition, inorganics and dioxin/furans were detected in the burn pits.

Surface Water: One PCB, one pesticide, and one inorganic were detected.

Sediment: One PCB and one pesticide were detected.

Current Installation Restoration Program (IRP) Phase: Remedial Action or Response Action (RA)

In 1989, PCB-contaminated soil was partially removed to eliminate contamination in soil adjacent to the site boundary.

In 1993, 21drums of liquid or solid waste, three underground storage tanks (USTs), three aboveground storage tanks (ASTs), various structures, and burnt debris were removed. In addition, petroleum- and PCB-contaminated soil and debris were excavated.

TCE and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) plumes have migrated off site. Residents who are using private drinking water wells in the area may be exposed to TCE and PCE. Prior to 1989, one residence was exposed to low levels of VOCs found in their drinking water well.

There is no public access to on-site soil. Prior to 1989, children playing near SS-01 may have been exposed to PCBs located in the soil outside the perimeter fence.

Children living in nearby residences and playing in the stream have access to the contaminants in the surface water and sediment.

This site is not discussed in detail in this public health assessment. A separate document evaluates the environmental issues listed in this table (ATSDR 2001).

Fire Training Area
(FT)-02
Fire Training Area No. 1
This site is located in the southwest part of the flight line area and consists of a 150- to 200-foot bermed burn area and nearby drum storage area. FT-02 was used as a fire protection training area from the early 1950s to 1958. Waste oil, waste fuel, paint thinners, and waste solvents were stored in 55-gallon drums until they were ignited in the water-saturated bermed area. Up to 1,000 gallons of waste fuel and oils were ignited 2 to 3 times a day. The fires were extinguished with protein foams, carbon tetrachloride, and chlorobromomethane. Groundwater: One VOC, SVOCs, and inorganics were detected.

Soil: VOCs, SVOCs, one pesticide, one PCB, and inorganics were detected.

Current IRP Phase: Remedial Investigation/ Feasibility Study (RI/FS) The contaminants in the groundwater pose no public health hazard because there are no private drinking water wells near this site and Andrews AFB receives its water supply from the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission (WSSC). WSSC uses surface water from the Potomac and Patuxent Rivers.

The contaminants in the soil pose no public health hazard because this site is currently located beneath taxiway 6 (i.e., under cement) and there is no public access to the site.

FT-03
Fire Training Area No. 2
This site is located immediately north of S. Perimeter Road in the southern part of Andrews AFB. It consists of a 300- to 400-foot bermed burn area and a nearby drum storage area. FT-03 was used for fire training activities from 1959 to 1972. Waste oil, jet fuel, paint thinner, and other industrial liquid wastes were stored in 55-gallon drums until they were ignited in the water-saturated bermed area. About 1,000 to 2,000 gallons of waste material were ignited once a day. Protein foams and chlorobromomethane were used to extinguish the fires. Groundwater: VOCs and inorganics were detected in monitoring wells.

Soil: Inorganics, VOCs, and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) were detected.

See LF-06 and LF-07 for surface water and sediment.

Current IRP Phase: RI/FS

In 1988, the site was covered with soil and stabilized with sewage sludge.

Until 1996, a portion of the site was being used as a soccer field. The site is currently in the footprint of the new golf course. Sections of the former fire training area were regraded and covered with fill during soccer field and golf course construction.

The contaminants in the groundwater pose no public health hazard because there are no private drinking water wells near this site and Andrews AFB receives its water supply from WSSC.

Soccer players, golfers, and maintenance workers had/have access to the site, however, it is not expected that they would come in contact with contaminated soil on a frequent and long-term basis.

Surface water runoff may impact Piscataway Creek.

FT-04
Fire Training Area No. 4
This site is located west of landfill (LF)-05 and south of the Aero-Club (an association of small plane pilots). It consists of a 180-foot diameter sloped burn area, a 390-gallon interceptor, and a 50-foot diameter leaching pond. FT-04 was used for fire protection training from 1973 to 1990. During this time, 1,000- and 2,000-gallon ASTs were filled with 300 gallons of clean JP-4 and/or motor oil and released to the burn area via a fuel distribution system. The fuel was ignited and extinguished with aqueous film forming foam and water. The spent foam, fuel, and water were collected in an oil/water separator. The oil was disposed of off site and the foam and water were discharged into the leaching pond. Groundwater: VOCs, SVOCs, and inorganics were detected in monitoring wells. VOCs were detected in hydropunch data.

Surface Soil: One VOC and one SVOC were detected.

Current IRP Phase: Interim Remedial Action (IRA)

In 1992, a free product removal system was installed and contaminated sludges from the leach pit were removed to eliminate the source of hydrocarbon contamination.The removal system is still operating, but is no longer collecting free product. The concrete oil/water separator, leaching pond, and ASTs were also removed and destroyed.

A pilot treatability study is scheduled to begin April 2001.

A computer search discovered that within a 3-mile radius of this site 17 domestic wells, 29 test wells, 1 farm well, and 1 industrial well exist. The contaminants in the groundwater pose no public health hazard because none of the above-mentioned wells that were used for drinking water were drawing from the surficial aquifer downgradient from the site. Andrews AFB receives its water supply from WSSC.

The contaminants in the soil pose no public health hazard because there is no public access to the site.

LF-05
D1 Landfill
This 12-acre site is located in the southeastern corner of Andrews AFB. From the 1960s through the 1980s, the landfill was used to dispose of general refuse, construction rubble, fly ash, waste solvents, dilute process wastes, waste oils, sewage sludge, and grease. Pits and trenches were used until the mid-1970s when two USTs were installed. The landfill flooded on several occasions allowing the contents of the waste pits to flow into Piscataway Creek. Groundwater: VOCs, SVOCs, and inorganics were detected in monitoring wells.

Soil: VOCS, SVOCs, and inorganics were detected.

Current IRP Phase: RI/FS

In 1988, the landfill area and waste-oil pit area were covered with several feet of soil.

VOCs have migrated 350 to 500 feet off base. A chlorobenzene groundwater plume extends off the southern site boundary toward Foxley Road. Three wells are suspected of being within 1 mile of LF-05. Residents and businesses using groundwater wells for their drinking water supply may be exposed to the off-site contamination.

The contaminants in the soil pose no public health hazard because there is no public access to the site.

LF-06
D3 Landfill
This 30-acre landfill is located in the southern part of Andrews AFB northeast of the intersection of S. Perimeter Road and Wisconsin Road. The landfill was used from the late 1950s to the late 1960s for the disposal of construction rubble, garbage, old paints, equipment for the R&M area, waste oils, paint thinners, and cleaning solvents. Groundwater: VOCs, SVOCs, pesticides, and inorganics were detected in monitoring wells.

Surface Soil: One VOC, SVOCs, pesticides, and inorganics were detected.

Surface Water: One pesticide and inorganics were detected.

Sediment: SVOCs, one pesticide, and inorganics were detected.

Current IRP Phase: Decision Document (DD) (draft) The contaminants in the groundwater pose no public health hazard because there are no potable supply wells installed downgradient of LF-06 and Andrews AFB receives drinking water from WSSC.

Runoff may impact surface water and sediment in Piscataway Creek, which is used for recreational purposes.

LF-07
D4 Landfill
This 60-acre landfill is located in the southern part of Andrews AFB southeast of the intersection of S. Perimeter Road and Wisconsin Road. The area was originally a gravel pit and was used to dispose of construction rubble from the 1960s through the 1980s. In 1984, furniture, washing machines, metals lockers, sheet and scrap metal, household garbage, plastics, empty 55-gallon drums, waste lumber, tires, pipes and hospital wastes were seen in the landfill. Shop wastes may also be present. Groundwater: VOCs, SVOCs, one pesticide, and inorganics were detected in monitoring wells.

Surface Soil: VOCs, SVOCs, pesticides, one PCB, and inorganics were detected.

Surface Water: Pesticides and inorganics were detected. In addition, one SVOC was detected during a storm event.

Sediment: SVOCs and inorganics were detected.

Current IRP Phase: DD (draft)

The landfill is currently in the footprint of the new golf course. Sections of the landfill were regraded and covered with fill during golf course construction.

The contaminants in the groundwater pose no public health hazard because there are no potable supply wells installed downgradient of LF-07 and Andrews AFB receives drinking water from WSSC.

Golfers and maintenance workers have access to the golf course, however, it is not expected that they would come in contact with contaminated soil on a frequent and long-term basis.

Runoff may impact surface water and sediment in Piscataway Creek, which is used for recreational purposes.

Storage Tank (ST)-08
MOGAS (motor fuel) UST Leak Site
This 13-acre military gas station is located in the eastern part of Andrews AFB on Pennsylvania Avenue and consists of several buildings (e.g., MOGAS station and maintenance, paint, and repair shops). Leaking tanks and spills occurring in the 1970s have contaminated the soil and groundwater. Groundwater: VOCs, SVOCs, and inorganics were detected in monitoring wells.

Surface Soil: VOCs, SVOCs, and inorganics were detected.

Surface Water: VOCs and inorganics were detected.

Sediment: VOCs, SVOCs, inorganics, and TPH were detected.

Current IRP Phase: DD-No Further Remedial Action Planned (NFRAP)

In 1991, two waste oil tanks were removed.

In 1997, three USTs were removed.

Oxygen release compounds and monitored natural attenuation is being used to remediate the groundwater contamination.

The contaminated groundwater is located entirely on base; therefore, no one is exposed because Andrews AFB receives drinking water from WSSC.

Contaminants in the soil pose no public health hazard because the contamination is located under pavement and there is no public access to the site.

Runoff may impact surface water and sediment in Charles Branch, which eventually drains into the Patuxent River. The Patuxent River is used for recreation.

ST-09
Abandoned USTs
This site identifies 10 abandoned, petroleum-containing USTs that were located at various areas across the base. Soil: Various petroleum products were detected. Current IRP Phase: DD-NFRAP

In 1986, 10 USTs and petroleum-contaminated soil were removed to eliminate the source of hydrocarbon contamination.

This site poses no public health hazard because the source of contamination has been eliminated. During the preliminary assessment no other contamination was detected other than the soil that was removed.
ST-10
PD-680 Spill Site
This site is located in the northwest part of Andrews AFB to the west of the operational apron and east of First Street. In the early 1970s, a leaking 15,000-gallon UST was replaced with a new fiberglass tank. However, the new tank was not properly installed and approximately 5,000 gallons of PD-680 leaked. In 1988, the tank was being used to store waste oil. Groundwater: VOCs, SVOCs, and inorganics were detected in monitoring wells. Current IRP Phase: RI/FS

The fiberglass UST was removed in 1991.

The contaminants in the groundwater pose no public health hazard because there are no private drinking water wells near this site and Andrews AFB receives its water supply from WSSC.
SS-11
Davidsonville Fuel Oil Spill
This site is located within the remote facility, Davidsonville Transmitter Site, which is located 15 miles northeast of Andrews AFB. The fuel oil spill was discovered in 1984 as the result of a leaking 2,000-gallon UST that was located behind the Transmitter Building. The leak was detected when free product was noticed in two utility vaults below the building. Groundwater: Free product was detected in a monitoring well. Current IRP Phase: RI/FS

In 1984, the tank, any visibly contaminated soil, and the oil from the utility vaults were removed.

Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) closed its case on this site in December 1985.

The source area was removed however, the full extent of groundwater contamination was not characterized. It is not known if contamination impacted the Davidsonville Transmitter Site supply well or residential groundwater wells outside the site.
SS-12
JP-4 (jet fuel) Spill Site
This site is located in a wooded area in the northeast part of Andrews AFB, west of the intersection of Route 4 and Dower House Road. In 1978, a fuel pipeline was punctured and about 1,000 gallons of JP-4 spilled into the soil and water of Cabin Branch. Groundwater: One VOC, SVOCs, and inorganics were detected.

Soil: VOCs, SVOCs, and one inorganic were detected.

Current IRP Phase: Preliminary Assessment/Site Investigation (PA/SI)

MDE closed its case on this site in May 2000.

Contaminated groundwater probably migrated to the surface water of Cabin Branch after the spill in 1978. Cabin Branch eventually drains into the Patuxent River, which is used for recreation.

Contaminated soil posed no public health hazard because there was no public access to the site.

Natural attenuation over the years has greatly reduced the amount of contamination present atthis site. Currently, there are no public health hazards from any of the pathways.

SS-13
POL Yard
This 4-acre site is located along the eastern border of Andrews AFB on E. Perimeter Road. The site consists of eight ASTs with the capacity of 15,000 to 1,050,000 gallons, 11 USTs with the capacity of 550 to 50,000 gallons, two pumping stations, two oil/water separators, an unused washrack area, a laboratory, and a main office. SS-13 has received, stored, and distributed petroleum products (e.g., JP-4, JP-5, JP-8, DF-2 diesel fuel, DL-2 diesel fuel, leaded gasoline, deicing solvent, and heating oil) since 1944. Throughout operation several fuel spills and leaks occurred. Two areas have extensive soil contamination - near the Northern Pump Station and along the Steuart Petroleum pipeline. Groundwater: VOCs, SVOCs, and inorganics were detected in monitoring wells.

Soil: VOCs and one inorganic were detected.

Current IRP Phase: RA

Sometime between 1989 and 1990, petroleum-contaminated soil was removed near UST #17.

In 1992, two USTs were removed and contaminated soil was excavated near the Southern Pump Station.

In 1993, a free product removal system was installed and contaminated soil was removed to eliminate petroleum contamination.

In 1995, a vacuum-enhanced pumping system was installed to eliminate fuel hydrocarbons from shallow water. This system was shut off in 1999 with MDE concurrence because minimal product was observed.

In the past, a plume of contamination extended slightly off base across Leapley Road with benzene as the primary contaminant of concern. A residential well survey found 11 wells in the immediate vicinity of SS-13. All but one well were not being used. The only well in use provided water for pets and washing cars. No public health hazard exists because WSSC provides drinking water to Andrews AFB and residents in this area. Currently, the plume exists entirely on base.

Contaminated soil poses no public health hazard because there is no public access to the site.

ST-14
East Side Service Station
This site is located in the northeast part of Andrews AFB, near the intersection of E. Perimeter Road and Fetchet Avenue. Several gas leaks occurred from poorly constructed pipeline joints. Groundwater: VOCs, SVOCs, and inorganics were detected in monitoring wells. Current IRP Phase: RI/FS

In 1983, three USTs were removed during a soil excavation that recovered 20,000 gallons of gasoline.

A Remedial Investigation was begun in 1999 to investigate the extent of the environmental contamination.

Three main plumes (TCE/dichloroethylene [DCE], carbon tetrachloride, and benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, and xylene [BTEX]) exist entirely on base. Contaminated groundwater poses no public health hazard because there are no private drinking water wells near this site and Andrews AFB receives its water supply from WSSC.

VOCs may be discharging into South Cabin Branch and eventually into the Patuxent River, which is used for recreation.

ST-15
Brandywine Housing USTs
The Brandywine Housing Annex is a remote facility located southeast of Andrews AFB in Prince George's County. It is surrounded by small residential communities, commercial areas, and municipalities. In 1984, fuel oil was seen seeping into a tributary of Mataponi Creek from a UST that was located about 350 feet west of the entrance to the Brandywine Housing Annex. Groundwater: VOCs and SVOCs were detected in monitoring wells.

In 1984, fuel was seen seeping into an unnamed tributary of Mataponi Creek.

Current IRP Phase: DD-NFRAP

In 1984, a series of five filter fences were installed at the seep and several locations downstream to contain the oil. Seven 550-gallon USTs were removed and replaced with an AST.

The contaminants in the groundwater pose no public health hazard because the known wells in the area are either upgradient from ST-15 or not in use. The Brandywine Housing Annex and adjacent homes are supplied with municipal water.

At the time of contamination, Mataponi Creek was not used for fishing or other recreation. Sometime after 1992, fishing and other recreational uses began. However, this was already after filter fences were installed that prevented future exposure.

Waste Accumulation Point (WP)-16
Brandywine Receiver Site
WP-16 is located within the remote facility, Brandywine Receiver Site, which is about 11 miles south of Andrews AFB. Brandywine Receiver Site has been in operation since 1970 to provide air to ground communications. WP-16 covers an area 20 feet by 30 feet, adjacent to Building 10. Drums of waste oil and/or paint thinner were stored at WP-16. Groundwater: VOCs, one SVOC, one pesticide, and inorganics were detected.

Soil: VOCs, SVOCs, one pesticide, and inorganics were detected.

Current IRP Phase: PA/SI The supply well for the Brandywine Receiver Site is located about 1,200 feet away from WP-16. However, contaminated groundwater is not expected to pose a public health hazard because the supply well is not downgradient from WP-16. In addition, the PA/SI concluded that contamination in the groundwater was minor.

Trace amounts of soil contamination pose no public health hazard because there is no public access to the site.

ST-17
Army/Air Force Exchange Station (AAFES) Gas Station
This site is located in the northwest section of Andrews AFB south of N. Perimeter Road on Brookley Avenue. It has dispensed unleaded gasoline and diesel fuel from five 10,000-gallon USTs since 1969. Historically, leaded gasoline was also dispensed. Two 2,000-gallon USTs contain waste oil and heating oil on the east side of the Gas Station. Groundwater: VOCs, one SVOC, and TPH were detected.

Soil: VOCs, one SVOC, and TPH were detected.

Current IRP Phase: RA

In 1992, a free product removal system was installed to eliminate petroleum contamination.

In 1993, USTs were removed and limited over-excavation was performed.

With natural attenuation, the BTEX and TPH plumes are receding. The benzene plume is expanding at a slow rate.

All three plumes (benzene, BTEX, and TPH) exist entirely on base. Contaminated groundwater poses no public health hazard because Andrews AFB receives its water supply from WSSC.

Soil contaminants pose no public health hazard because there is no public access to the site.

ST-18
2132 Richmond Drive, Andrews AFB
This site is located at the intersection of Richmond Drive and San Antonio Boulevard. The site was investigated because residents of the Military Family Housing Units noticed stained soil. It was found that a 1,000-gallon heating oil storage tank was leaking. Groundwater: VOCS, one SVOC, and TPH were detected. Free-phase product was present at three monitoring wells.

Surface Soil: VOCs, SVOCs, and TPH were detected.

Surface Water: One SVOC and TPH were detected.

Sediment: SVOCs and TPH were detected.

Current IRP Phase: RA

In 1992, the leaking UST was removed and replaced, but in 1993, the second UST was also removed when the housing units were switched to natural gas heating.

A free product removal system was installed to eliminate petroleum contamination and a product skimming system was installed to recover free-phase hydrocarbons.

Soil was removed in 1992 and 1993 and interim removal actions planned for 2001 will address any residual dissolved contaminants.

Contaminated groundwater poses no public health hazard because there are no private drinking water wells near this site and Andrews AFB receives its water supply from WSSC.

Residents of the Housing Complex may have been exposed to contaminated soil.

Children living in the Housing Complex and playing in the unnamed tributary to Paynes Branch have access to contaminants in the surface water and sediment.

ST-19
Base-wide Heating Oil USTs
ST-19 collectively refers to 51 sites where residual petroleum contamination in the subsurface soil and/or groundwater has been identified. The sites are located in the Family Housing Units along the western border of Andrews AFB from the Virginia Avenue Gate to Menoher Drive, in the southwest corner north of Old Alexandria Ferry, and in the northeast section, north of Fetchet Avenue and east of Patrick Avenue. Groundwater: TPH, naphthalene, and free-phase petroleum were detected. Current IRP Phase: RA

Of the 51 sites originally identified all but eight are closed.

TPH and naphthalene have migrated on average about 100 feet from the source areas. Free-phase petroleum contamination is limited to within 40 feet of the source areas. Contaminated groundwater poses no public health hazard because there are no on-site drinking water wells and Andrews AFB receives its water supply from WSSC.
ST-20
Nine USTs
The nine USTs were situated at various locations across Andrews AFB. They ranged in size from 550 gallons to 10,000 gallons. Most contained heating oil, diesel, or waste oil. One contained aviation soap and deicing fluid. Fuel oil Current IRP Phase: RA

Between February 1991 and May 1993, all of the USTs were removed. A replacement tank at one of the sites was improperly installed and was removed and recertified at a later date.

All but one of the sites have been closed. The remaining site will soon be closed. Prior to closure MDE must concur that the area is not contaminated. Therefore, no public health hazard exists from these locations because no contamination exists at these sites.
SS-21
Engine Test Cell, Building 1950
This site is located in the northeast part of Andrews AFB near the intersection of Arnold Avenue and Fairbanks Street. The site acts as a jet engine testing facility and requires the use of petroleum hydrocarbons during testing. The site consists of one UST, an active oil/water separator, a former oil/water separator, and a JP-4 storage tank. Groundwater: VOCs and one SVOC were detected in monitoring wells.

Surface Water: No contaminants were detected.

Sediment: TPH was detected.

Current IRP Phase: RI/FS

The test cell buildings were demolished in fall 2000, and 250 cubic yards of petroleum impacted soils associated with a tank, piping, and an oil water separator were removed at this time. Monitoring of the groundwater at the site will continue while closure options are evaluated.

Contaminated groundwater poses no public health hazard because there are no private drinking water wells near this site and Andrews AFB receives its water supply from WSSC. Contaminated groundwater is not moving off site into drainage ditches.

TPH may be discharging into Henson Creek and eventually into the Potomac River, which is used for recreation, although it would be greatly diluted and is not expected to pose a public health hazard .

SS-22
Hangar 13
This site is located in the eastern part of Andrews AFB, near Hangar 17 and north of SS-13. Fuels and solvents were suspected of spilling on or around the apron, and in 1994 petroleum-contaminated soil and groundwater was discovered. Groundwater: VOCs and one SVOC were detected in monitoring wells.

Surface Soil: One VOC was detected.

Current IRP Phase: IRA

Since January 1998, free product is being removed monthly using a mobile vacuum-enhanced pumping system.

A free-product recovery system is planned to be installed in 2001.

Contaminated groundwater poses no public health hazard because there are no private drinking water wells near this site and Andrews AFB receives its water supply from WSSC.

Contaminated soil poses no public health hazard because the source area is located under pavement and there is no public access to the site.

Area of Concern (AOC)-23
Radioactive Waste Burial Site
This site is located south of S. Perimeter Road and east of Virginia Avenue in a wooded area that is surrounded by a fence. Radioactive tubes and dials were placed in concrete containers and buried under 2 feet of soil during the 1950s. Surface Soil: Radiation levels within the containers were not above natural background readings. Current IRP Phase: RA

In 1999, four concrete containers were removed and shipped off site to a licensed nuclear storage facility. Clean fill was used to backfill the excavation.

No public health hazard exists because no contamination exists at this site.
AOC-24
Car Care Center, Building 1568
This site is located south of F Street near the west gate entrance and consists of a building and parking area. The building was constructed in 1953 and is utilized for car maintenance and repair by base employees. Potential Contaminants: Fuel oil Current IRP Phase: PA/SI Pending

One UST was removed at an unknown date.

Several tanks have been abandoned in place and will be evaluated through sampling in this area.

Investigations are underway to characterize contamination at this site. Exposure to possible soil contaminants is not expected because there is no public access to the site. Exposure to possible groundwater contaminants is not expected, because the groundwater flow is toward the base and Andrews AFB receives its water supply from WSSC.
AOC-25
Auto Hobby Shop, Building 3537
This site is located off Salem Road about 1,000 feet south-southwest of the east gate entrance and consists of a building, several storage areas, and paved areas. The shop was built in 1961 and is used for vehicle maintenance by base employees. Potential Contaminants: Fuel oil Current IRP Phase: PA/SI Pending Investigations are underway to characterize contamination at this site. Exposure to possible soil contaminants is not expected because there is no public access to the site. Exposure to possible contaminants in on-site groundwater is not expected because Andrews AFB receives its water supply from WSSC.
AOC-26
Fuel Hydrant System
The fuel hydrant system is located in the vicinity of the runways, east of FT-02. Potential Contaminants: Jet fuel Current IRP Phase: PA/SI Pending Investigations are underway to characterize contamination at this site. Exposure to possible soil contaminants is not expected because there is no public access to the site. Exposure to possible groundwater contaminants is not expected because there are no private drinking water wells near this site and Andrews AFB receives its water supply from WSSC.
AOC-27
Disposal Pits (south runway area)
This site is located south of runway 1R, adjacent to LF-07. Debris and other waste material have been deposited at AOC-27. A neighboring farmer reported that hazardous wastes were disposed of at the site. Potential Contaminants: Unknown Current IRP Phase: PA/SI Pending

This site is currently in the footprint of the new golf course. Sections were regraded and covered with fill during golf course construction.

Investigations are underway to characterize contamination at this site. Exposure to possible groundwater contaminants is not expected because Andrews AFB receives drinking water from WSSC.

Golfers and maintenance workers have access to the golf course, however, it is not expected that they would come in contact with potentially contaminated soil on a frequent and long-term basis.

AOC-28
Davidsonville Dumping Area
This site is located within the remote facility, Davidsonville Transmitter Site, which is in Anne Arundel County. AOC-28 consists of several piles of debris (e.g., scrap metal, wood, tree stumps, and domestic rubble), located about 2,000 feet east of the western boundary of the Site. None Current IRP Phase: This site was identified in 1993, but was removed from the IRP list because it was not found to contain contaminants of concern. No public health hazard exists because no contamination exists at this site.
AOC-29
Unevaluated Areas
This site covers the entire flight line area including the skeet range and USTs at two steam plants. From the late 1960s to the early 1970s, sludge from the Blue Plains Wastewater Treatment Plant was applied to the area between the main runways. Potential Contaminants: Fuels and solvents Current IRP Phase: PA/SI Pending Investigations are underway to characterize contamination at this site. Exposure to possible soil contaminants is not expected because there is no public access to the site. Exposure to possible groundwater contaminants is not expected because there are no private drinking water wells near this site and Andrews AFB receives its water supply from WSSC.
AOC-30
Building 1206
This site is located to the west of the runway area, near South Dakota Avenue. Potential Contaminants: Fuels and solvents Current IRP Phase: PA/SI Pending Investigations are underway to characterize contamination at this site. Exposure to possible soil contaminants is not expected because there is no public access to the site. Exposure to possible groundwater contaminants is not expected because there are no private drinking water wells near this site and Andrews AFB receives its water supply from WSSC.
AOC-31 Dry Cleaners This site is located west of the runway area, north of Menoher Drive. Potential Contaminants: Solvents Current IRP Phase: PA/SI Pending Investigations are underway to characterize contamination at this site. Exposure to possible soil contaminants is not expected because there is no public access to the site. Exposure to possible groundwater contaminants is not expected because there are no private drinking water wells near this site and Andrews AFB receives its water supply from WSSC.
AOC-32
Hanger 15
This site is located in the runway area, east of Runway 1R. Potential Contaminants: Fuels and solvents Current IRP Phase: PA/SI Pending Investigations are underway to characterize contamination at this site. Exposure to possible soil contaminants is not expected because there is no public access to the site. Exposure to possible groundwater contaminants is not expected because there are no private drinking water wells near this site and Andrews AFB receives its water supply from WSSC.

References:

Ahern, Col Daniel B, 89th AW/CC. 1992. Decision Document: Site FT-03, Fire Training Area 2, Andrews AFB. September 25, 1992.

Ahern, Col Daniel B, 89th AW/CC. 1992. Decision Document: Site ST-15 (Brandywine Housing Annex), Andrews AFB. September 25, 1992.

Andrews AFB, Installation Restoration Program (IRP). 1993. Assessment of Impacts of Landfills LF-06 and LF-07 on Piscataway Creek and Surrounding Area. December 1993.

Andrews AFB, IRP. 1999. Status Report, Supplemental Remedial Investigation: IRP Site ST-14. December 1999.

Andrews AFB.1997. Management Action Plan. July 1997.

Andrews AFB. 1999. Draft Community Relations Plan. December 1999.

Andrews AFB, 89 CES/CEVR. 1996. Decision Document for No Action at Sites LF-06 and LF-07, Andrews AFB. April 1996.

Dames & Moore, Inc. 1992. Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP). Groundwater Contamination Survey, Andrews AFB. Bethesda, MD. April 1992.

Dames & Moore, Inc. 1992. HAZWRAP. Technical Memorandum for the ST-15 Site (SP-6 Brandywine Housing Annex), Andrews AFB. Bethesda, MD. September 1992.

Dames & Moore, Inc. 1994. HAZWRAP. Technical Memorandum of Findings: ST-08. Andrews AFB. Bethesda, MD. November 1994.

Dames & Moore, Inc. 1996. U.S. Department of the Air Force. Decision Document for the Remediation of TCE-Contaminated Groundwater at the Brandywine DRMO, Revision 1.0.Andrews AFB. Bethesda, MD. August 1996.

Dames & Moore, Inc. 1998. U.S. Department of the Air Force. Decision Document for the Remediation of TCE-Contaminated Groundwater at the Brandywine DRMO. Andrews AFB.Bethesda, MD. February 1998.

Department of the Air Force. Letter to 1776 ABW/DEEV (Joy Hoyle) from Capt. Michael Blackmon concerning Brandywine Well Sampling Results. Brooks AFB, TX. June 29, 1989.

EA Engineering, Science, and Technology, Inc. 1993. U.S. Air Force. Human Health Risk Assessment, Andrews AFB, Family Housing Unit UST Leak. Loveton, MD. January 20, 1993.

EA Engineering, Science, and Technology, Inc. 1993. Army Corp of Engineers. Human and Environmental Health Risk Assessment, Fire Training Area No. 4, Andrews AFB. Sparks,MD. July 1993.

EA Engineering, Science, and Technology, Inc. 1995. Army Corp of Engineers. Piscataway Creek Remedial Investigation, Andrews AFB. Volumes 1 and 2. Sparks, MD. April 1995.

EA Science Engineering, Science, and Technology, Inc. 1996. Army Corp of Engineers. Remedial Investigation Report for Leroy's Lane Landfill, Andrews AFB. Volumes 1 and 2.Sparks, MD. April 1996.

Engineering Science, Inc. 1985. U.S. Air Force. Phase I - Records Search, Andrews AFB. June 1985.

Gannett Fleming, Inc./Dynamac Corporation. 1997. EPA. Data Acquisition Summary Report: Andrews AFB. December 30, 1997.

Halliburton NUS Corporation. 1995. Remedial Action Report: Soil and Tank Removal - Brandywine DRMO. Andrews AFB. Oak Ridge, TN. July 1995.

Handex of Maryland. 1991. Phase I Environmental Site Assessment: Andrews AFB Service Station. Odenton, MD. April 19, 1991.

Handex of Maryland. 1992. Letter to Michelle Linn from Felix Nathan and Steve Saul concerning the Emergency Environmental Assessment for ST-18. May 28, 1992.

IT Corporation. 1992. Tennessee Center for Research and Development (TCRD). Site Assessment Report and Corrective Action Plan for the BX Service Station, Andrews AFB.Knoxville, TN. September 1992.

IT Corporation. 1995. TCRD. Natural Attenuation Report: Site ST-17 (AAFES Station), Andrews AFB. Knoxville, TN. March 1995.

IT Corporation. 1995. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Remedial Design Report: Petroleum, Oil, and Lubricant (POL) Yard, Andrews AFB. Monroeville, PA. May 1995.

IT Corporation. 1995. TCRD. Base Operation and Maintenance Summary Report: Sites ST-18 and FT-04, Andrews AFB. Knoxville, TN. June 1995.

IT Corporation. 1995. TCRD. Phase II Site Investigation Report: Hangar 13 Area, Spill Site 22 (SS-22), Andrews AFB. Knoxville, TN. October 1995.

IT Corporation. 1996. TCRD. Phase II Site Investigation Report: 2132 Richmond Drive Site 18 (ST-18), Andrews AFB. Knoxville, TN. July 1996.

IT Corporation. 1996. TCRD. Phase II Site Investigation Report: Buildings 1950/1951, Site SS-21, Andrews AFB. Knoxville, TN. July 1996.

IT Corporation. 1997. Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence, Brooks AFB. Final Site Characterization Summary Report, Intrinsic Remediation Treatability Study for MilitaryFamily Housing Area, ST-19. Knoxville, TN. February 1997.

IT Corporation. 1997. Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence, Brooks AFB. Interim Remedial Action/Treatability Study Report: ST-08, Military Gas Station. Knoxville, TN.March 1997.

IT Corporation. 1997. Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence, Brooks AFB. Interim Remedial Action/Treatability Study Report: SS-22, Hangar 13. Knoxville, TN. April 1997.

IT Corporation. 1999. Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence, Brooks AFB. Supplemental Investigation Report: Military Gas Station, ST-08. Knoxville, TN. May 1999.

IT Corporation. 1999. Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence, Brooks AFB. Supplemental Investigation Report: Site SS-22 (Hangar 13). Knoxville, TN. June 1999.

IT Corporation. 1999. Figure, Carbon Tetrachloride Concentrations in Groundwater, Phase II RI, Site ST-14, Andrews AFB. September 2, 1999.

IT Corporation. 1999. Figure, TCE Concentrations in Groundwater, Phase II RI, Site ST-14, Andrews AFB. September 2, 1999.

Maryland Department of the Environment. 2000. Letter to Brigadier General James Hawkins from John Smiechowski concerning closure of SS-12 at Andrews AFB. Baltimore, MD. June15, 2000.

McGowan, Maj. Lawrence A, MGMC/SGPB. 1992. Overview of Human Health Risk Assessment for Richmond Avenue Oil Leak. July 8, 1992.

Menarchik, Col. Edward D, 1776 ABW/CV. 1990. IRP Site Decision Document: ST-09. September 27, 1990.

MITRE Corporation. 1991. Review of Investigations at Site LF-05, Andrews AFB. 1991.

Pacific Environmental Services, Inc. 1999. U.S. Air Force, IERA. Investigation of Low-Level Radioactive Waste Burial Site, Andrews AFB. Herndon, VA. May 1999.

PEER Consultants, P.C. AFCEE/ERD and 89 CES/CEVR. Draft Environmental Analytical Data, Informal Technical Information Report for the POL Storage Yard, Site SS-13, AndrewsAFB.

PEER Consultants, P.C. 1995. AFCEE/ERD. Sampling and Analysis Plan for Removal and Decontamination of Underground Storage Tanks and Site Restoration at Site ST-20,Andrews AFB. July 1995.

PGCHD. 1992. Letter to Jim Rowell from Melanie Christodoulou concerning drinking water samples taken on Foxley Road. August 27, 1992.

Tetra Tech, Inc. 1995. HQ AFCEE/ES. Decision Document: Site SS-13, The POL Yard, Andrews AFB. San Bernardino, CA. September 29, 1995.

Tetra Tech, Inc. 1996. Headquarters Air Mobility Command. Preliminary Assessment and Site Investigation Report: AOCs 23-25, 27-29, and IRP Sites FT-02, FT-03, SS-12, and WP-16.Falls Church, VA. July 1996.

U.S. Air Force. 1994. U.S. Army Corp of Engineers and 89 Airlift Wing. Decision Document for Pilot/Treatability Study, Fire Training Area No 4, Andrews AFB. August 1994.

U.S. Department of the Interior. 1989. Andrews AFB. IRP Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS), Stage 1. Richmond, VA. April 1989.


Table 2.

Evaluation of Exposure Pathways at Andrews Air Force Base (Evaluation of the implications of these exposure pathways is discussed in the preceeding text)
Pathway Name Exposure Pathway Elements Comments
Source of Contamination Environmental Media Point of Exposure Route of Exposure Exposed Population Time of
Exposure
Surface Soil Pathways On-site In 1990/1991, two water towers containing lead-based paint were sandblasted Surface soil Children playing around lead-contaminated soil
  • Incidental ingestion
  • Dermal contact
On-site childrenPast, current, andfuture

1990 - ?

One child's blood lead levelincreased during exposure. Childrenplaying and living in the area may beincidentally exposed to residual lead-based paint contamination in the soil.
ST-18Surface soilResidentsworking orchildren playingon their lawns
  • Incidental ingestion
  • Dermal contact
Residents of theFamily HousingUnitsPast

1991 - 2001

Petroleum contamination was presentat the ground surface of the FamilyHousing Units on Richmond Drive.
FT-03Surface soil Soccer field
  • Incidental ingestion
  • Dermal contact
Soccer playersPast

Prior to 1996

Soccer players may have beenincidentally exposed to soilcontaminated from past fire trainingactivities.
FT-03, LF-07, andAOC-27Surface soil Golf course
  • Incidental ingestion
  • Dermal contact
Golfers andmaintenanceworkersPast, current, andfuture

1996 - ?

Because the golf course was nevercapped, golfers and maintenanceworkers may incidentally be exposedto landfill contaminants.
Off-siteAirplanes in theflightlineSurface soilArea outside thesouthern baseboundary
  • Incidental ingestion
  • Dermal contact
Workers in thecropland andresidentsoutside the basePast, current, andfuture

1942 - ?

The flightline of an airfield typicallycontains polycyclic aromatichydrocarbons (PAHs) that aredeposited from the airplanes flyingoverhead.
Surface Water and Sediment PathwaysOn-siteST-18Surface water andsedimentChildren playingin the unnamedtributary toPaynes Branch
  • Incidental ingestion
  • Dermal contact
On-site childrenPast, current, andfuture

1991 - ?

The unnamed tributary to PaynesBranch runs through the FamilyHousing Units on Richmond Driveand is accessible to children.Semi-volatile organic compounds(SVOCs) and petroleumhydrocarbons were detected.
SS-12, ST-14, andST-19Surface water andsedimentChildren playingin Cabin Branch
  • Incidental ingestion
  • Dermal contact
On-site childrenPast, current, andfuture

1978 - ?

Cabin Branch runs near FamilyHousing Units in the northeast and isaccessible to children.Volatileorganic compounds (VOCs),SVOCs, and metals were detected.
LF-06 and LF-07Surface water andsedimentPeople recreatingat the Base Lake
  • Incidental ingestion
  • Dermal contact
Residents andvisitors ofAndrews AFBPast, current, andfuture

Early 1960s - ?

The Base Lake is used for recreationby Andrews AFB residents andvisitors. VOCs, SVOCs, and metalswere detected.
LF-06 and LF-07FishBase Lake
  • Ingestion
People catchingand eating fishPast, current, andfuture

Early 1960s - ?

It is unclear if people are eating fishfrom the Base Lake. VOCs, SVOCs,pesticides, metals, and PCBs weredetected in fish samples.
Surface Water and Sediment PathwaysOff-siteFT-03, FT-04, LF-05, LF-06, LF-07,and AOC-27Surface water andsedimentPeople usingPiscatawayCreek
  • Incidental ingestion
  • Dermal contact
RecreationalusersPast, current, andfuture

Late 1950s - ?

Piscataway Creek is used forrecreation downstream fromAndrews AFB. VOCs, SVOCs,pesticides and metals were detected.
FT-03, FT-04, LF-05, LF-06, LF-07,and AOC-27FishPeople fishing inPiscatawayCreek
  • Ingestion
People catchingand eating fishPast, current, andfuture

Early 1950s - ?

Recreational and subsistence fishingoccur in Piscataway Creek. VOCs,SVOCs, pesticides, polychlorinatedbiphenyls (PCBs), and metals weredetected in fish samples.
SS-21SedimentPeople usingHenson Creek
  • Incidental ingestion
  • Dermal contact
RecreationalusersPast, current, andfuture

1942 - ?

Henson Creek is used for recreationdownstream from Andrews AFB.Petroleum contamination wasdetected.
ST-08, SS-22, andAOC-25Surface water andsedimentPeople usingCharles Branch
  • Incidental ingestion
  • Dermal contact
RecreationalusersPast, current, andfuture

1960s - ?

Charles Branch is used for recreationdownstream from Andrews AFB.VOCs, SVOCs, metals, andpetroleum hydrocarbons weredetected.
Groundwater PathwayOff-siteLF-05GroundwaterDrinking waterpumped fromprivategroundwaterwellsin the area
  • Inhalation
  • Ingestion
  • Dermal contact
Residents andbusinesses whouse shallowwells fordrinkingPast, current, andfuture

1960's - ?

It is not known if the off-site plumeis impacting unidentified drinkingwater wells.
SS-11GroundwaterDrinking waterpumped fromshallowgroundwaterwells in the area
  • Inhalation
  • Ingestion
  • Dermal contact
Employees andresidents whodrink waterfrom shallowwellsPast, current, andfuture

1984 - ?

The full extent of groundwatercontamination has not beencharacterized, therefore, it is notknown if wells in the area are beingimpacted by the heating oil thatleaked from an underground storagetank.
Soil Gas PathwayOn-siteFT-04, LF-05, ST-08, SS-13, ST-14,ST-17, ST-18, SS-21,and SS-22Soil gasOccupyingbuildings thataccumulatevolatilizedorganics
  • Inhalation
  • Dermal contact
Base personnelwho enterbuildingslocated abovegroundwaterplumesPast, current, andfuture

Prior to 1985

Buildings above contaminatedgroundwater have the potential toaccumulate volatilized organiccompounds.


TABLE 3.

CHEMICALS DETECTED IN SURFACE SOIL AT ST-18
Chemical Range
(ppm)
Frequency of Detections Frequency above Standards Comparison Values
(ppm)
Type
Volatile Organic Compounds
Toluene41/1601,000child I-EMEG
o-Xylene411/16010,000 child I-EMEG
(total xylenes)
Semi-volatile Organic Compounds
Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate280-1,50012/16 12
3
50
1,000
CREG
child RMEG
Butyl benzyl phthalate1501/16010,000child RMEG
Di-n-butylphthalate130-68012/1605,000child RMEG
Fluoranthene96-1202/1602,000child RMEG
Fluorene2201/1602,000child RMEG
Naphthalene5-993/1601,000child I-EMEG
Pyrene120-2,7002/1612,000child RMEG
Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons
Diesel Range Organics3-3,70016/16NANANA

Reference: EA Engineering 1993

Abbreviations:
CREG - Cancer Risk Evaluation Guide
I-EMEG - Intermediate Environmental Media Evaluation Guide
NA - not available
ppm - parts per million
RMEG - Reference Dose Media Evaluation Guide


Table 4.

Chemicals Detected in Surface Soil at LF-07
Chemical Range
(ppm)
Frequency of Detections Frequency above Standards Comparison Values
(ppm)
Type
Volatile Organic Compounds
Acetone0.008 J1/2005,000child RMEG
Carbon dioxide0.011 BJ-0.092 BJ20/20NANANA
Methylene chloride0.008 J1/20090CREG
Tetrachloroethylene0.024-0.199/200500chid RMEG
Semi-volatile Organic Compounds
2-Methylnaphthalene0.076 J1/2001,600RBC
9H-Carbazole0.044 J-0.58/20032 RBC
(carbazole)
Acenaphthene0.067 J-0.537/2003,000child RMEG
Acenaphthylene0.052 J-0.12 J8/20NANANA
Anthracene0.045 J-1.4 D12/20020,000child RMEG
Benz(a)anthracene0.079 J-11.0 D18/2050.87RBC
Benzo(a)pyrene0.087 J-10.0 D18/20170.1CREG
Benzo(b)fluoranthene0.078 J-14.0 D18/2080.87RBC
Benzo(g,h,i)perylene0.1 J-9.5 D18/20NANANA
Benzo(k)fluoranthene0.061 J-4.6 D15/2008.7RBC
Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate0.054 BJ-0.48 BJ20/20050CREG
Butyl benzyl phthalate0.042 J-0.132 J3/20010,000child RMEG
Chrysene0.1 J-11.0 D18/20087RBC
Di-n-butyl phthalate0.079 J-0.17 J4/2005,000child RMEG
Di-n-octyl phthalate0.043 J-0.46 J2/20020,000child I-EMEG
Dibenz(a,h)anthracene0.59 J-1.313/20130.087RBC
Dibenzofuran0.041 J-0.25 J4/200310RBC
Fluoranthene0.11 J-17.0 D18/2002,000child RMEG
Fluorene0.064 J-0.57/2002,000child RMEG
Indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene0.099 J-9.9 D18/2060.87RBC
Naphthalene0.039 J-0.12 D5/2001,000child I-EMEG
Phenanthrene0.062 J-8.7 D17/20NANANA
Pyrene0.084-20.0 D18/2002,000child RMEG
Pesticides/Polychlorinated Biphenyls
4,4'-DDD0.003 P-0.0089 P4/2003CREG
4,4'-DDE0.0038 P-0.0545/2002CREG
4,4'-DDT0.016-0.0433/2002CREG
Aldrin0.0026-0.026 P4/2000.04CREG
Aroclor-12540.18-0.42/2020.04child C-EMEG
Dieldrin0.0038 P-0.04613/20 2
0
0.04
3
CREG
child C-EMEG
Endosulfan II0.01851/200100 child C-EMEG
(endosulfan)
Endrin ketone0.0041 P-0.024 P5/20NANANA
Heptachlor0.0044-0.00572/2000.2CREG
Heptachlor epoxide0.0023 P-0.024 P12/2000.08CREG
alpha-BHC0.00271/2000.1CREG
alpha-Chlordane0.0026 P-0.0448/2002 CREG
(chlordane)
beta-BHC0.0033 P-0.0054 P3/2000.4CREG
gamma-Chlordane0.0024 P-0.0338/2002 CREG
(chlordane)
Metals
Aluminum2,260-9,980*20/200100,000child I-EMEG
Arsenic0.86 N-4.2 NS20/20 20
0
0.5
20
CREG
child C-EMEG
Barium11-20020/2004,000child RMEG
Beryllium0.1 B-0.720/200100child RMEG
Cadmium0.4 B-6.319/20010child C-EMEG
Calcium44 B-11,20020/20NANANA
Chromium5-26.2*20/200230 RBC
(chromium VI)
Cobalt1 B-10.220/2004,700RBC
Copper2 B-70.620/2003,100RBC
Iron4,740-42,70020/20223,000RBC
Lead9-28320/200400SSL
Magnesium247 B-2,86020/20NANANA
Manganese12-1,61020/2003,000child RMEG
Mercury0.1-0.713/20NANANA
Nickel3 B-27.220/2001,000child RMEG
Potassium135 B-1,08020/20NANANA
Selenium0.075 BNW-0.24BNW13/200300child C-EMEG
Sodium32 B-173 B8/20NANANA
Vanadium11-27.920/200200child I-EMEG
Zinc7-401 NT20/20020,000child C-EMEG

Reference: EA Engineering 1995a

Abbreviations:
CREG - Cancer Risk Evaluation Guide
C-EMEG - chronic Environmental Media Evaluation Guide
I-EMEG - intermediate Environmental Media Evaluation Guide
NA - not available
ppm - parts per million
RBC - Risk-based Concentration
RMEG - Reference Dose Media Evaluation Guide
SSL - Soil Screening Level

Qualifiers:
* - duplicate analysis not within control limits
B - found in blank (organics) or value between IDL and CRQL (inorganics)
D - diluted
J - estimated
N - spiked sample not within control limits
P - greater than 25% difference in two columns
W - post-digestion spike is out of control limits



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