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PUBLIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT

NAVAL CONSTRUCTION BATTALION CENTER
(a/k/a DAVISVILLE NAVAL CONSTRUCTION BATTALION CENTER)
DAVISVILLE, WASHINGTON COUNTY, RHODE ISLAND


TABLES

Table 2.

Evaluation of Public Health Hazards at NCBC, Davisville
Site Site Description /Waste Disposal History Investigation Results/Environmental Monitoring Results1 Corrective Activities and Current Status Evaluation of Public Health Hazard
Nike Battery Site (PR-58) The Nike Battery Site, located west of Site 03, is not part of NCBC Davisville. In 1955, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) constructed a Nike Missile battery at the site. Three underground missile silos were deactivated in 1962. In 1974, the land to the west of Seabee Avenue, including the Nike Site, was transferred to the General Services Administration. Later, ownership was transferred to the Rhode Island Port Authority (RIPA). RIPA (now the Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation) leased the land to Peabody Clean Industries (PCI) between 1980 and 1982. PCI used the area as a hazardous waste tank farm and was directed to clean soil at the site in 1983. The USACE has conducted environmental investigations at the site as part of the Formerly Used Defense Sites (FUDS) program. In 1995, the silos were backfilled with sand. Groundwater: Groundwater under Sites/Study Areas (SAs) 01, 02, 03, and 04, and adjacent areas (including the Nike Site) was sampled in the Phase III Comprehensive Remedial Investigation for Study Areas 01 and 04, and IRP Sites 02 and 03. The following chemicals were detected above CVs: bromomethane, chloroform, 1,1-dichloroethene, 1,2-dichloroethene (total), manganese, methylene chloride, naphthalene, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, tetrachloroethene, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, trichloroethene (TCE), and vinyl chloride. Previous investigations indicate that the source of the volatile organic compound (VOC) plume is within the former Nike Site. However, the bedrock aquifer has not been sufficiently characterized. The USACE is in the process of characterizing the source and extent of the dissolved VOC plume. The Navy is also continuing its investigations. Groundwater:
No hazard due to lack of exposures to date. However, ATSDR supports continued investigations with special focus on determining the likelihood of further private well contamination in the future. We will review additional data as they become available. We recommend that future exposure to contaminated groundwater at the former Nike Battery Site and beneath the Navy property be prevented through land use restrictions or remediation of source areas.
CED Drum Storage Area
(Study Area 01)
Study Area 01 is approximately 200 feet north of Building 224. Drums containing waste oil and solvent were stored in the area from the late 1960s to 1974, when they were removed. A portion of the area was apparently used as a leach field from December 1991 to April 1992. The leach field was used to dispose of surface water runoff and storm water from a former truck washing area at Building 224. Groundwater: Arsenic, heptachlor, iron, lead, manganese, tetrachloroethene, and TCE were detected above CVs. For additional chemicals please see Nike Site information.
Soil (depth <1'): Arsenic, benzo(a)pyrene, and dibenzo(a,h)anthracene were detected above CVs. Mercury was detected above background levels.
Current Status: A Draft Final Record of Decision (ROD) and responsiveness summaries for SAs 01and 04 and Sites 2 and 3 are scheduled for July 2001. EPA has recommended that the Navy conduct additional monitoring and interim remedial actions (i.e., ground water use restrictions) after an appropriate plan has been developed to address the off-site portion of the VOC plume. Groundwater: No public water supply wells are located on or downgradient of the site; therefore, no one is exposed to contaminated groundwater. The groundwater beneath the site will not be used for a drinking water source in the future.
Soil: Contaminant levels are not high enough for unlikely/infrequent exposures to pose a health hazard.
CED Battery Acid Disposal Area
(Site 02)
Site 02 is located by Building 224. A dry well and leach field were used to dispose of dilute sulfuric acid (containing lead) between 1955 and 1980. Groundwater: Antimony, arsenic, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, cadmium, iron, lead, tetrachloroethene, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, TCE, vanadium, and xylenes (total) were detected above CVs. For additional chemicals please see Nike Site information.
Soil (depth <2'): Arsenic was detected above its CV.
Dry well Surface Water: Antimony and lead were detected above CVs.
Dry well sediment: Lead was detected above its CV.
Corrective Activities: The dry well and leach field were removed in June 1996.
Current Status: See Study Area 1.
Groundwater: See Study Area 1.
Soil: Levels of arsenic are not high enough for unlikely/infrequent exposure to pose a health hazard.
Dry well: The public did not have access to contamination present in the dry well before it was removed.
CED Solvent Disposal Area
(Site 03)
Site 03 is a previously paved lot north of Parade Road. Paint thinners and solvents were disposed of on the ground from 1955 to the late 1970s. According to aerial photographs from 1951 to 1970, vehicles and equipment were stored at the site. Groundwater: Arsenic, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, 1,2-dichloroethene (total), iron, lead, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, TCE, and vanadium were detected above CVs. For additional chemicals please see Nike Site information.
Soil (depth <2'): Arsenic and lead were detected above CVs.
Current Status: See Study Area 1. Groundwater: See Study Area 1.
Soil: Levels of arsenic and lead are not high enough for unlikely/infrequent exposure to pose a health hazard.
CED Asphalt Disposal Area
(Study Area 04)
Study Area 04 is approximately 800 feet west of Building 224. A black, pliable, asphaltic material was disposed in a trench in the late 1960s. Groundwater: Please see Nike Site information.
Soil (depth <1'): Aroclor-1260, arsenic, benzo(a)pyrene, iron, and lead were detected above CVs. Mercury was detected above background levels.
Corrective Activities: The asphaltic material and contaminated soil were excavated in November 1996.
Current Status: See Study Area 1.
Groundwater: See Study Area 1.
Soil: Levels of contaminants are not high enough for unlikely/infrequent exposure to pose a health hazard. Contaminated soil has been removed.
Transformer Oil Disposal Area East of Building 37
(Site 05)
Site 05 is a flat overgrown area east of Building 37 and next to Camp Avenue. The site is located outside the fence line for NCBC Davisville, but is still considered Navy property. In 1968 or 1969, approximately 30 gallons of PCB-contaminated transformer oil were disposed of on the ground. The site is next to an area that was used for storage of materials and equipment awaiting shipment. Soil (depth <2'): Arsenic, benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(b)/benzo(k)fluoranthene, 4,4'-DDT, dibenzo(a,h)anthracene, and iron were detected above CVs.
Surface Water from Hall Creek Drainage System (Sites 05, 06, and 13): Antimony, arsenic, 1,1-dichloroethene, lead, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, and TCE were detected above CVs.
Sediment from Hall Creek Drainage System: Aroclor-1260 was detected above its CV; total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were 18 ppm; total cancerous PAHs were 7 ppm; and total semivolatile organic chemicals (SVOCs) were 22 ppm.
Current Status: A no further action ROD for soil was issued in September 1995. Soil: Levels of contaminants are not high enough for unlikely/infrequent exposure to pose a health hazard.
Surface Water/Sediment:
Surface water bodies near this site are not used for swimming.
Solvent Disposal Area
(Site 06)
Site 06 is a flat grassy area between Buildings 67 and 38, covering about a quarter of an acre. From 1970 to 1972, waste chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents were disposed on the ground. An estimated 1,750 gallons of waste were drained in the area. Groundwater: Aluminum, arsenic, chromium, iron, lead, manganese, and vanadium were detected above CVs.
Soil (depth 0-2'): Arsenic, benzo(a)pyrene, lead, and toluene were detected above CVs.
Surface Water from Hall Creek Drainage System: Antimony, arsenic, 1,1-dichloroethene, lead, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, and TCE were detected above CVs.
Sediment from Hall Creek Drainage System: Aroclor-1260 was detected above its CV; total PAHs were 18 ppm; total cancerous PAHs were 7 ppm; and total SVOCs were 22 ppm.
Corrective Activities: The area where the disposal took place has been covered with about 6 inches of soil and re-seeded.
Current Status: A no further action ROD for soil and groundwater was issued in September 1998.
Groundwater: No public or private water supply wells are located downgradient of the site; therefore, no one is exposed to contaminated groundwater.
Soil: Levels of contaminants are not high enough for unlikely/infrequent exposure to pose a health hazard.
Surface Water/Sediment:
Surface water bodies near this site are not used for swimming.
Calf Pasture Point
(Site 07)
and Calf Pasture Point Munitions Bunkers
Calf Pasture Point (CPP) is a peninsula in the northeastern portion of NCBC Davisville. Site 07 is on the southern portion of CPP, south of three former munitions bunkers. During 1942 and 1943, dredging material was used to fill in a shallow lagoon at CPP. Between 1960 and 1974, approximately 20, 5-gallon cans of calcium hypochlorite were disposed in a drainage ditch near Bunker 60. Calcium hypochlorite cans were removed between 1978 and 1982. Thirty to forty 35-gallon cardboard containers of an unidentified chloride compound were stored at Calf Pasture Point in 1973 and later buried. At some point between 1968 and 1974, a trench was filled with containers of "Decontaminating Agent Non-Corrosive." The munitions bunkers were used to store ordnance when the base was operational. Groundwater: Acetone, aluminum, arsenic, benzene, bromodichloromethane, chloroform, chloromethane, chromium, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethene, 1,2-dichloroethene (total), 1,3-dichloropropene, iron, lead, manganese, nickel, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, tetrachloroethene, thallium, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, TCE, vanadium, and vinyl chloride were detected above CVs.
Soil (depth 0-2'): Arsenic was detected above its CV; lead was detected below its CV.
Sediment: Arsenic and iron were detected above CVs.
Shellfish: Aroclor-1242, Aroclor-1260, arsenic, benzo(a)pyrene, mercury, and zinc were detected above CVs. Several chemicals without CVs were detected: benzotriazole (0.025 ppm), chlorinated benzotriazole (0.0036 ppm), coronene (0.00052 ppm), lead (0.36 ppm), and perylene (0.0061 ppm).
Corrective Activities: A removal action was conducted from October 1996 to March 1997 for Bunkers 59 and 60. The bunkers underwent lead decontamination and the doors to the bunkers were welded shut. In fall of 2000, these bunkers were demolished. Demolition of Bunker 339 occurred in February 1997.
Current Status: A Final ROD signed in September 1999 addresses this site. The selected remedial action calls for a deed restriction prohibiting the use of groundwater beneath the site and long-term monitoring of the groundwater plume. The property has been transferred to the town of North Kingstown for non-residential uses.
Groundwater: No public or private water supply wells are located downgradient of the site. Land use restrictions will prevent future use of the groundwater.
Soil: Levels of arsenic are not high enough for unlikely/infrequent exposure to pose a health hazard.
Sediment: Some people swim in the entrance to Allen Harbor and people are likely to swim on the local beach on Calf Pasture Point.
Shellfish: Past consumption of shellfish in Allen Harbor could pose an increased risk of adverse health effects. Current and future exposures to contaminated shellfish are restricted by the shellfishing ban.
DPDO Film Processing Unit
(Site 08)
Site 08 is a flat, grass-covered area east of Building 314, in West Davisville. There is an asphalt road running through the center of the site. For 6 months during 1973, the Defense Property Disposal Office (DPDO) recovered silver from photographic wastes. Waste liquids from the process were discharged onto the pavement outside of Building 314 during rain events. No information concerning the extent of the disposal is available. Groundwater: Arsenic, iron, and manganese were detected above CVs.
Soil (depth 0-2'): Arsenic, benzo(a)pyrene, dibenzo(a,h)anthracene, and PCB-1260 were detected above CVs.
Surface Water from Sandhill Brook Drainage System: Manganese was detected above its CV.
Sediment from Sandhill Brook Drainage System: Total PAHs were 2 ppm; total cancerous PAHs were 1 ppm; and total SVOCs were 2 ppm.
Current Status: A no further action ROD was issued for soil in September 1995. A no further action ROD for groundwater was issued June 1998. Groundwater: No public or private water supply wells are located downgradient of the site; therefore, no one is exposed to contaminated groundwater.
Soil: Levels of contaminants are not high enough for unlikely/infrequent exposure to pose a health hazard.
Surface Water/Sediment:
Surface water bodies in the vicinity of NCBC, Davisville near this site are not used for swimming.
Allen Harbor Landfill
(Site 09)

 

Site 09 encompasses approximately 15 acres. East of the site is Allen Harbor and west is Sanford Road. Vegetated wetlands border the site to the north and south. From 1946 to 1972, the landfill was used for the disposal of NCBC Davisville and NAS Quonset Point wastes. Wastes included municipal-type waste, asbestos, construction debris, sewage sludge, rubble, PCB oil, paint thinners, degreasers, preservatives, ash, and waste fuel oil. Wastes were usually burned and covered with soil. Groundwater: Acetone, aluminum, antimony, arsenic, barium, benzene, bis(2-chloroethyl)ether, cadmium, carbazole, chlorobenzene, chloroethane, 4,4'-DDD, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichloroethene (total), 1,2-dichloropropane, dieldrin, 2,4-dimethylphenol, iron, lead, manganese, methylene chloride, 4-methylphenol, 4-nitroaniline, n-nitroso-di-n-propylamine, PCB-1260, pentachlorophenol, phenol, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, tetrachloroethene, thallium, toluene, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, TCE, and vinyl chloride were detected above CVs.
Surface soil: Antimony, Aroclor-1254, Aroclor-1260, arsenic, benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, cadmium, chromium, copper, dibenzo(a,h)anthracene, dieldrin, indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene, iron, lead, nickel, PCBs, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-pdioxin, and zinc were detected above CVs.
Surface Water: Arsenic, cadmium, heptachlor epoxide (Allen Harbor Drainage System sample), manganese, lead (Allen Harbor Drainage System sample), and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane were detected above CVs.
Sediment: Antimony, arsenic, benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, cadmium, chromium, indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene, iron, and lead were detected above CVs.
Sediment from Allen Harbor Drainage System: Aroclor-1260 was detected above its CV; total PAHs were 75 ppm; total cancerous PAHs were 41 ppm; and total SVOCs were 81 ppm.
Shellfish: Aroclor-1242, Aroclor-1260, arsenic, benzo(a)pyrene, mercury, and zinc were detected above CVs. Several chemicals without CVs were detected: benzotriazole (0.025 ppm), chlorinated benzotriazole (0.0036 ppm), coronene (0.00052 ppm), lead (0.36 ppm), and perylene (0.0061 ppm).
Corrective Activities: In 1984, the area adjacent to the landfill in Allen Harbor was closed to shellfishing. The landfill is capped and remedial actions are complete.
Current Status: A ROD was issued September 1997. An Explanation of Significant Difference (ESD) for the ROD is being finalized. The ESD will address the PCBs detected in the soil in the northern portion of the site. Transfer of the landfill to the town of North Kingstown for non-residential uses is underway. Land use restrictions will prohibit groundwater use and certain intrusive activities, such as digging and dirt biking (to protect the cap at the landfill).
Groundwater: No public or private water supply wells are located downgradient of the site. Land use restrictions will prevent future use of the groundwater.
Surface soil: Exposure to soil is limited because the landfill is capped.
Surface Water/Sediment:
Some people swim in the entrance channel to Allen Harbor. Levels of contaminants are not high enough for unlikely/infrequent exposure to pose a health hazard.
Shellfish:
Past consumption of shellfish could pose an increased risk of adverse health effects. Current and future exposures to contaminated shellfish is restricted by the shellfishing ban.
Camp Fogarty Disposal Area
(Site 10)
Naval Construction Force personnel were trained at Camp Fogarty during World War II. After the war some of the land was given back to the original owners, while the rest of the land was used to train Seabees until 1974. Camp Fogarty was transferred to the Army in December 1993 and assigned to the Rhode Island National Guard. Site 10 consists of three depressions which were once used to store construction debris. Access to Camp Fogarty is restricted by fences and facility personnel. Groundwater: Arsenic, chromium, lead, and manganese were detected above CVs.
Soil (depth 0-2'): Antimony, arsenic, benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, dibenzo(a,h)anthracene, and lead were detected above CVs.
Surface Water from Hunt River Drainage System: Arsenic, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, and manganese were detected above CVs.
Sediment from Hunt River Drainage System:
Arsenic was detected above its CV.
Corrective Activities: A removalaction in late 1996 disposed of the remaining debris off site.
Current Status: A no further action ROD was issued in June 1998 for soil and groundwater.
Groundwater: Site 10 might be located upgrade of a water supply well. Metal contamination at the site does not pose a health hazard because the well is 1 mile away.
Soil: Levels of contaminants are not high enough for unlikely/infrequent exposure to pose a health hazard.
Surface Water/Sediment:
Surface water bodies in the vicinity of NCBC, Davisville in this area are not used for swimming.
Old Fire Fighting Training Area
(Site 11)
Site 11 is an open grassy field surrounded by roads. The site was allegedly used as a fire fighting training area from the mid-1940s to 1955. Once every two or three months waste oils were poured on the ground, ignited, and then extinguished. Recent investigations have questioned whether or not the fire fighting activities actually took place at Site 11; photographs show that the site was used to store equipment. Groundwater: Aluminum, antimony, arsenic, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, and vanadium were detected above CVs.
Soil (depth 0-2'): Arsenic, Aroclor-1260, benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, and dibenzo(a,h)anthracene were detected above CVs.
Surface Water from Mill Creek Drainage System: Arsenic, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, dieldrin, manganese, and phenol were detected above CVs.
Sediment from Mill Creek Drainage System:
Total PAHs were 14 ppm; total cancerous PAHs were 9 ppm; and total SVOCs were 15 ppm.
Current Status: A no further action ROD for soil and groundwater was issued September 1998. Groundwater: No public water supply wells are located downgradient of the site; therefore, no one is exposed to contaminated groundwater.
Soil: Levels of contaminants are not high enough for unlikely/infrequent exposure to pose a health hazard.
Surface Water/Sediment:
Surface water bodies in the vicinity of NCBC, Davisville in this area are not used for swimming.
DPDO Transformer Disposal Area
(Site 12)
Site 12 is in Bay B of Building 316, West Davisville. Building 316 was built in 1953 on a fill area constructed in 1941. The fill area had been used as a facility for the manufacture and assembly of Quonset hut kits during World War II. Bay B of Building 316 was used from 1972 to 1984 by the Navy DPDO to store transformers awaiting disposal. A transformer was punctured in 1977; the resulting oil leak was cleaned from the concrete floor of the building. Soil: PCBs were detected above their CVs. Corrective Activities: An interim remedial action was conducted in 1991 to remove PCB-contaminated soil and concrete. A remedial action under the ROD began in January 1995. All concrete and soil with a PCB concentration greater than 10 ppm was removed.
Current Status: The ROD was modified in the Explanation of Significant Difference, September 1998. Institutional controls and a 5-year review are no longer required.
Soil: PCB contamination was located inside Building 316. Contaminated areas have been remediated.
Waste Oil Disposal Area North of Building W-3 and W-4
(Site 13)
Site 13 is a large grassy field located northwest of Buildings W-3, W-4, and the former T-1. Approximately 300 gallons of waste oils were spread on fields northwest of Buildings W-3, W-4, and T-1 each month from 1945 to 1955. Groundwater: Aluminum, antimony, arsenic, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, cadmium, chromium, 1,2-dichloroethane, heptachlor epoxide, iron, lead, manganese, pentachlorophenol, and vanadium were detected above CVs.
Soil (depth 0-2'): Aroclor-1248, Aroclor-1254, Aroclor-1260, and arsenic were detected above CVs.
Surface Water from Hall Creek Drainage System: Antimony, arsenic, 1,1-dichloroethene, lead, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, and TCE were detected above CVs.
Sediment from Hall Creek Drainage System:
Aroclor-1260 was detected above its CV; total PAHs were 18 ppm; total cancerous PAHs were 7 ppm; and total SVOCs were 22 ppm.
Corrective Activities: A removal action was performed from July 1996 through February 1997 to remove PCB-contaminated soil. Catch basins and storm drains were also cleaned. The removal area was backfilled with clean fill and seeded. An additional removal action was performed in December 1997.
Current Status: A no further action ROD for soil and groundwater was issued in September 1998.
Groundwater: No public or private water supply wells are located downgradient of the site; therefore, no one is exposed to contaminated groundwater.
Soil: Levels of contaminants are not high enough for unlikely/infrequent exposure to pose a health hazard. Elevated Aroclor-1260 levels were localized. PCB-contaminated soil has been removed.
Surface Water/Sediment:
Surface water bodies near this site are not used for swimming.
Building 38 Transformer Oil Spill
(Site 14)
Site 14 is located in the South Bay of Building 38 in the Warehouse Area of NCBC's Main Center. Building 38 was built in 1942 and warehoused base construction materials. The Public Works Department took over the building in 1973 after the closure of NAS Quonset Point. In 1981, a transformer oil spill was noticed on the floor of the South Bay. Soil: PCBs were detected above their CVs. Corrective Activities: An interim remedial action was conducted in 1991 to remove PCB-contaminated soil and asphaltic concrete. A remedial action under the ROD began in January 1995. All asphaltic concrete and soil with a PCB concentration greater than 10 ppm was removed.
Current Status: The ROD was modified in the Explanation of Significant Difference, September 1998. Institutional controls and a 5-year review are no longer required.
Soil: PCB contamination was located inside Building 38. Contaminated areas have been remediated.
Building 56
(Study Area 15)
Building 56 was built in 1944 to re-refine oil. It was later used for paint storage, mixing, and spraying; and pesticide storage and mixing. In 1983, the building was refurbished and an exterior concrete pad for rinsing pesticide application tanks was built. From 1985 to 1997, the building was used to store hazardous waste for less than 90 days. Soil (0-1'): Arsenic, benzo(a)pyrene, and lead were detected above CVs. Corrective Activities: The Building 56 superstructure was demolished in September 1997. Lead-contaminated soil was removed in October and November 1997. A manhole was backfilled in December 1997.
Current Status: A No Further Action Decision Document was issued May 1998.
Soil: Levels of contaminants are not high enough for unlikely/infrequent exposure to pose a health hazard. Lead contamination was localized to within a few feet of the building. Both the building and the lead-contaminated soil around it have been removed.
EBS 21 Environmental Baseline Survey Review Item 21, a former aboveground storage tank, was located on an isolated parcel of property (subparcel 12 A) across the street from the RIEDC building on Davisville Road. The tank was operational from 1944 through 1978. Undocumented spills of fuel oil are believed to have occurred in this area. Site Investigation Interim Report 1 was issued in April 1999 (EA 1999c). Petroleum constituents were found in groundwater and soil in the immediate vicinity of EBS 21. In 1998, about 200 gallons of fuel oil were removed from groundwater in the vicinity of EBS 21. Additionally, about 2100 cubic yards of soil contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons were removed from the property.

Data collection is still in progress.

Drinking water wells downgradient of the contamination are not known to be present. Future exposures to contamination are unlikely since removals have occurred, the contamination is being monitored and future land reuse is commercial/industrial.
Creosote Dip Tank and Fire Fighting Training Area(EBS 28 or Site 16) A creosote dip tank in the area leaked and contaminated the surrounding soil. Creosote dipping of wood pilings took place during the late 1960s. Part of the area was used for fire training during the late 1960s. Soils and storm drain material at Building 41 may be contributing to groundwater contamination beneath Site 16. Building 41 is located southwest of Site 16 and is believed to have been used for degreasing and metal preservation. Groundwater: Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate was detected above its CV.
Soil (depth <2'): Benzo(a)pyrene and benzo(b)fluoranthene were detected above CVs.
Corrective Activities: Afour-phase soil removal action was conducted around the creosote dip tank to remove PAH-contaminated soil.
Current Status: EBS 28 was initially investigated under the Environmental Baseline Survey Program. On February 8, 1999, EPA proposed to add EBS 28, as a study area, to the Federal Facilities Agreement so that it could be investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. On March 3, 1999 SA 16 was officially designated an IRP site, and on August 1999, was upgraded to Site 16. An RI is scheduled for September 2002. The EPA and RIDEM have requested additional investigations of soils and storm drains at Building 41, a potential source of groundwater contamination at Site 16.
Groundwater: No public or private water supply wells are located downgradient of the site, therefore, no one is exposed to contaminated groundwater.
Soil: Levels of contaminants are not high enough for unlikely/infrequent exposure to pose a health hazard.

1See Appendix A for an explanation of comparison values.

Sources: EA 1996, 1997a, 1998a,b,d,f, 1999c, 2000a; Halliburton NUS 1994a,b,c; Navy 1998a,b, 2000b; TRC 1991, and 1994a,b,c,d.


Table 3.

Potential Exposure Pathways
Pathway Name Source of Contamination Environmental Medium Point of Exposure Route of Exposure Potentially Exposed Population Comments
Potential Exposure Pathways
Drinking Water Metals at Camp Fogarty Disposal Area (Site 10)
VOCs at Calf Pasture Point (Site 07)
Metals, VOCs, SVOCs, dieldrin, 4,4'-DDD, and PCBs at Allen Harbor Landfill (Site 09)
VOC plume from the Nike Battery Site source area (Nike Battery Site is not part of NCBC, Davisville)
Groundwater Public and private wells Ingestion, dermal contact, and inhalation Residents and workers at or near NCBC, Davisville Public water supply wells are upgradient of all sites at NCBC, Davisville except Site 10. ATSDR has determined that metal contamination at Site 10 does not pose a public health hazard because the site is located 1 mile from the closest water supply well.
Sites 07 and 09 are downgradient of all public water supply wells. Land use restrictions will prevent the use of groundwater at these sites in the future.
No public wells are located downgradient of the VOC plume under the former Nike Battery Site and NCBC, Davisville property. Recent testing of private wells north of the plume determined that VOCs are not a health hazard.
Soil Lead paint
Waste oils contaminated with PCB-1260
Landfill
Soil Ground near Building 56 (Study Area 15)
PCB-1260 at Waste Oil Disposal Area North of Buildings W-3 and W-4 (Site 13)
Metals, PCBs, and SVOCs at Allen Harbor Landfill (Site 09)
Incidental ingestion and/or dermal contact Children, on-base residents, and softball field users People were unlikely to contact contaminated soil at Study Area 15 and Site 13 because contamination appeared to be localized in the past and the sites have since been remediated.
Access to Site 09 has always been restricted. Current remediation at the site includes a cap on the landfill.
Surface Water/Sediment Metals, PAHs, and SVOCs Surface water/sediment Streams and ponds in the vicinity of NCBC, Davisville and Allen Harbor Incidental ingestion and/or dermal contact Children and on/off-base residents No swimming takes place in the streams and ponds in the vicinity of NCBC, Davisville. Some people swim in Allen Harbor. The infrequent and low level exposures are unlikely to result in adverse health effects.
Shellfish Allen Harbor Landfill and possibly Calf Pasture Point Shellfish: metals, PCBs, pesticides, and PAHs Allen Harbor Ingestion Children and other shellfish consumers Prior to the 1984 ban on shellfishing, some exposures at levels of health concern could have occurred. Therefore, we have classified consumption of shellfish from Allen Harbor near the landfill as a past public health hazard.
After the ban was instituted, no significant exposures to contaminated shellfish should have taken place. However, mid-1990s data indicate mercury levels that could result in adverse health effects if shellfish were consumed. Therefore, ATSDR supports continuation of the shellfishing ban.


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Table 4.

Shallow Organic Groundwater Contaminants Detected Near the Shore at Site 09(1)
Chemical Maximum Detected Concentration
(ppb)
Frequency of Detection ATSDR Comparison Value for Drinking Water
(ppb)
Exceeds ATSDR Comparison Value?
(Yes/No)
Volatile Contaminants
Acetone 390 5/33 1,000/RMEG (child) No
Benzene 17 18/33 1/CREG Yes
Chlorobenzene 1,200 8/33 200/RMEG (child) Yes
1,4-Dichlorobenzene 420 2/17 4,000/I-EMEG (child) No
1,2-Dichloroethane 34 1/33 0.4/CREG Yes
1,2-Dichloroethene (total) 510 11/33 200/RMEG (child)(2) Yes
1,2-Dichloropropane 940 1/33 900/C-EMEG (child) Yes
Methylene chloride 33 5/33 5/CREG Yes
Tetrachloroethene 670 1/33 0.7/CREG Yes
1,1,2-Trichloroethane 1 1/33 NA NA
Trichloroethene 74 6/33 3/CREG Yes
Vinyl chloride 60 4/33 0.2/C-EMEG (child) Yes
Semi-volatile Contaminants
bis(2-Chloroethyl)ether 2 2/17 0.03/CREG Yes
bis(2-Chloroisopropyl)ether 2 1/17 400/RMEG (child) No
Dibenzofuran 24 2/17 NA NA
2-Methylphenol 350 2/17 500/RMEG (child) No
4-Methylphenol 370 2/17 NA NA
Source: EA 1997a.
Abbreviations:
C-EMEG = Chronic Environmental Media Evaluation Guide
CREG = Cancer Risk Evaluation Guide
I-EMEG = Intermediate Environmental Media Evaluation Guide
NA = Not Available
RMEG = Reference Dose Media Evaluation Guide


Table 5.

Groundwater Monitoring Well Summary for North of the Nike Battery Site1
Chemical Maximum Detected Concentration
(ppb)
Frequency Detected Above Comparison Value ATSDR Comparison Value
(ppb)
Exceeds ATSDR Comparison Value?
(Yes/No)
Volatile Organic Compounds
1,1-Dichloroethene21/120.06/CREGYes
cis-1,2-Dichloroethene2702/9270/MCLYes
trans-1,2-Dichloroethene1001/92100/MCL/LTHAYes
Tetrachloroethene11/120.7/CREGYes
1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane2006/120.2/CREGYes
1,1,1-Trichloroethane50/12200/MCL/LTHANo
1,1,2-Trichloroethane214/120.6/CREGYes
Trichloroethene6206/123/CREGYes
Inorganic Compounds
Iron II11,4001/111,000/RBCYes
Sulfate20,1000/1500,000/MCL(proposed)No

Source: EA 1998f.

Abbreviations:
CREG = Cancer Risk Evaluation Guide
LTHA = Lifetime Health Advisory for drinking water
MCL = Maximum Contaminant Level
RBC = Risk-based Concentration

1. Data for this table were taken from the following 11 monitoring wells: EA-103, EA-104, EA-106D, EA-106R,EA-112D, EA-112R, EA-113D, ME-2, ME-3, MW Z3-01, and MW-2.

2. Total dichloroethene was analyzed for and detected in three additional wells, but a distinction between cis- and trans- was not made.


Table 6.

Shellfish Sampling Results
Contaminant Maximum Detected Concentration
(mg/kg)
EPA Region III Risk Based Concentration
(mg/kg)
Arsenic0.2860.0021
Cadmium0.2391.4
Copper 12.654
Iron80.0410
Lead0.149 no value
Mercury4.910.14
Zinc473.0410
Aldrin0.0000460.00019
Benzo(a)pyrene 0.001240.00043
Aroclor-12420.003310.0016
Aroclor-12540.001240.0016
Aroclor-12600.02290.0016
DDE0.0000460.0331

Source: EA 1996, 1997b.

Concentrations are expressed on a wet weight basis by decreasing the dry weight concentration by 10% (EPA 2000).



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