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PUBLIC HEALTH ASSESSMENTTroy Mills Landfill
Troy, Cheshire County, New Hampshire

EPA ID No. GAD980559413
October 28, 2004

Prepared by:

Bureau of Environmental and Occupational Health
New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services
Under a Cooperative Agreement with
Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry



Appendix D : Description of Health Comparison Values

Health assessors use health comparison values to help decide whether compounds may need further evaluation. Health comparison values are derived using information on the toxicity of the chemical and assuming frequent opportunities for exposure (e.g., a residential setting) to the contaminated media (e.g., in this instance TML). For non-caner toxicity , DHHS typically uses Minimal Risk Levels from the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) or Reference Doses from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which are estimates of daily human exposure to a contaminant that are unlikely to cause adverse noncancer health effects over a lifetime. Cancer risk comparison values are based on EPA's chemical-specific cancer slope factors and an estimated excess lifetime cancer risk of one in one million. Therefore, if the concentration of a chemical is less than its comparison value, it is unlikely that exposure would result in adverse health effects, and further evaluation of exposures to that chemical is not warranted. If the concentration of a chemical exceeds a comparison value, adverse health effects from exposure are not necessarily expected, but potential exposures to that chemical at the site should be further evaluated.

Specific types of health comparisons are described below in order of preference for ATSDR Public Health Assessments or Health Consultations.

Health Comparison Values Derived by ATSDR
  • Environmental Media Evaluation Guide (EMEG)
  • Reference Dose Media Evaluation Guide (RMEG)
  • Cancer Risk Evaluation Guide (CREG)
EMEG and RMEG values are used to evaluate the potential for noncancer health effects. CREG values provide information on the potential for carcinogenic effects. EMEG values are derived for different durations of exposure. Acute EMEGs correspond to exposures lasting less than 14 days. Intermediate EMEGs correspond to exposures lasting between 14 days and 1 year. Chronic EMEGs correspond to exposures lasting longer than 1 year. CREG and RMEG values are derived assuming a lifetime duration of exposure. All of these comparison values are derived assuming opportunities for exposure in a residential setting.

Health Comparison Values Derived by EPA
  • Risk-Based Concentrations (RBC) for air, water, soil, and food
  • Lifetime Health Advisory (LTHA) for drinking water
The Superfund Technical Support Section in EPA Region III derives Risk-Based Concentrations values using available toxicological information and assuming frequent residential exposures to the contaminated media. A Lifetime Health Advisory is the concentration of a chemical in drinking water that is not expected to cause any adverse non-carcinogenic effects over a lifetime of exposure.

Environmental Regulatory Standards
  • Risk-Based Concentrations (RBC) for air, water, soil, and food
  • Lifetime Health Advisory (LTHA) for drinking water
  • Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for drinking water
  • Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) for drinking water
  • Ambient Groundwater Quality Standards (AGQS)
  • Method 1 Soil Standards (S-1)
A Maximum Contaminant Level Goal is a nonenforceable health goal from EPA that is set at a level at which no known or anticipated adverse effect on the health of persons occur and which allows an adequate margin of safety. A Maximum Contaminant Level is the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water, and is an enforceable standard. MCLs are set as close to the MCLG as feasible using the best available treatment technology and taking cost into consideration. Ambient Groundwater Quality Standards and Soil S-1 Standards are regulatory standards for groundwater and soil, respectively, from the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (see DES Administrative Rule Env-Wm 1403 and DES Risk Characterization and Management Policy, respectively).

Appendix E : Needs Assessment Survey Questionnaire

Educational Needs Assessment for the Troy Mills Landfill Site, Troy, New Hampshire

February 2004
Vickie A. Shallow, Health Promotion Advisor
New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services
Office of Community and Public Health
Bureau of Environmental Occupational Health


Introduction

The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Bureau of Environmental and Occupational Health (BEOH) is currently conducting a public health assessment on the Troy Mills Landfill National Priority Listing Site in Troy, New Hampshire, under it's cooperative agreement with the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). This needs assessment was undertaken as part of the planning process to develop a health education program for residents living in around the area of the Troy Mills Landfill. The goal was to document and respond accordingly to community interest in the Site, community knowledge about the Site, community health concerns in relation to the Site, preferred sources of information regarding the Site, and residents' need for further information.

  1. Scheduled Release of PHA

    The initial release of the Public Health Assessment was prepared on April 27, 2004. The final version of the Public Health Assessment should be available by the end of summer 2004.


  2. Ongoing Activities

    In addition to this Needs Assessment Survey for the Public Health Assessment, a health assessor is currently reviewing environmental data taken from the landfill site and surrounding area.


  3. Methods/Community Outreach Plan

    A needs assessment survey (included with this appendix) was developed and distributed via post office to 1,000 households in the town of Troy and to 10 Fitzwilliam households living along the borders of the Troy Mills Landfill Site.

    On November 6, 2003, DHHS distributed 1,010 surveys to residents of Troy and Fitzwilliam using bulk mail service through the local post office. Approval and assistance with this project was gained from Ralph Wentworth, a concerned citizen. To insure the return of the surveys, two drop boxes were strategically placed where residents could access them easily. One at the town's Tax Collector office and at the second was placed at the Public Library. The 10 Fitzwilliam households that received surveys also received postage-paid envelopes with the survey to ease the return of their replies. Twenty (20%) of the Fitzwilliam residents responded to the survey. To be informative, enclosed with each survey were (1) information on who is conducting the survey, (2) an explanation of the purpose of the survey, and (3) an explanation of the process of conducting a health assessment using the information provided in the survey. Letters to the Troy Town News communicated the intent of the survey, the start date, the ending date, and the status of information gathered and any updates of the information that would be forthcoming.

    All completed surveys were returned to DHHS, by drop box or mail by December 6, 2003. Notices in the local Troy Town News were posted to remind residents about the survey, its purpose, and the date that it should be returned to the drop boxes. The survey results were compiled and have been incorporated into this Educational Needs Assessment. A detailed summary of responses is attached at the end of this appendix.

    Along with the Educational Needs Assessment survey, residents' concerns and questions were also collected through a Public Availability Session that was held on September 23, 2003. Press releases were sent to The Keene Sentinel and the Troy Town News announcing the time, date, and purpose of the Public Availability Session. Ten residents attended this session, representing 1% of the total households for this area. This low participation rate could be contributed to limited interest in the safety of the site and limited resources to communicate the meeting time. Prior to this meeting there had been several meetings about the Troy Landfill Site. Our meeting might have been more successful if it was held in conjunction with one of the previous meeting held by DES and the town officials. It is possible that residents did not identify this meeting as important because several meetings had already been held. DHHS representatives were present at the Public Availability Session to educate the community on the public health assessment process and recorded community health concerns for incorporation into the health assessment document. Because residents' concerns shared during the Public Availability Session are considered confidential, all comments have been paraphrased to protect the identity of the resident.

    Another source of community concerns was the needs assessment survey, of which a total of 34 were received by the due date of December 6, 2003.


  4. Key Findings
    1. The majority of the survey respondents (97%) expressed an interest in the Troy Mills Landfill Site.
    2. Currently, most residents receive site information through newspapers, mail, and community meetings.
    3. Most residents would prefer to receive site information through the mail and the local newspaper.
    4. Nearly all of the survey respondents expressed a desire for information on contaminants found on-site, health effects and the routes of exposure.
    5. Almost all respondents are concerned about water quality issues in their neighborhood and future risk to the water table due to this site.
    6. Eighty percent (79.4%) of the respondents are "very interested" in the site.
    7. Over half of the residents (58.8%) have lived in their homes over 10 years.
    8. Several families have young children under the age of 6 years.
    9. Forty-three percent of the respondents are "unsure" if the Troy Mills Landfill Site possesses a risk to their health.
    10. Over one-half of the respondents feel recreational activities near the Site are putting them at risk.
    11. Respondents were mainly concerned with:
      • The health effects of exposure to Site contaminants for themselves and their families.
      • Question of water supplies being contaminated ranging from ground water, water table, and the aquifer.
      • Any long-term health effects that may exist.


  5. Discussion

    A Public Health Assessment (PHA) focuses on identifying and evaluating any public health impact from contaminants released from a hazardous waste site or some type of environmental release event and provides information to the community about health risks and effects posed by contact with site contaminants. A PHA typically consists of three main components:
    1. A review of available environmental data;
    2. A compilation and response to community concerns;
    3. A review of health outcome data, when applicable.
    The Educational Needs Assessment is a tool that will help focus the second component of the PHA. Health assessors use the information gathered during a needs assessment to address a community's concerns, and to answer questions in the PHA document.

    There was a lower than expected return rate (3.5%) on this mail-in survey. This indicates that residents are not interested in this site or any health risks that it may pose for themselves and the community, or are uninformed about the site. The lack of response could be because the drop boxes were not ideally located for residents. Due to budget constraints postage paid services were not feasible. In the future, it recommended that a small token of appreciation or incentive be included with a mailing to support the return of the surveys.

    Over half (58.8%) of survey respondents have lived in their homes over 10 years. Although less a quarter (17.1%) had children under the age of 6 years currently living there, length of residency responses indicate a high likelihood that many children have grown up in this area and the surrounding area of the Troy Mills Landfill Site.
Residents' Attitudes

Respondents were asked many questions regarding their attitudes about the Site. Specifically residents were asked, "What is your general feeling about the Site?" 31.4% of respondents felt "it does affect their health," while 42.8% were "unsure" if it affected their health. The number of respondents answering "unsure" suggests that respondents do not have enough information about the site to make an educated response. This indicates that there is still a need for health education on the chemicals found at the site and any health risk that may exist for residents. When respondents were asked their level of interest in the Site, 79.4% of respondents indicated they were "very interested," while 17.6% indicated they were "somewhat interested." This indicates that respondents want to know about this site and any health risks that may exist. It also indicates that respondents want feedback and follow up on the site, so that they can be aware of any possible health risks.

Residents' Knowledge

Respondents were asked many questions to gage their knowledge pertaining to the Site; specifically, "How did you hear about the chemicals?" "What health impacts or effects have you heard about?" and "How did you hear about these impacts or effects?" The responses ranged from having no idea, to identifying a specific area and acreage affected. Some indicated that the chemicals are to be capped off and contained. The chemicals dumped were to make vinyls. The knowledge of how many barrels located on site ranged from 1,000 to 10,000 barrels. Individuals mentioned several chemicals that were present here including PCBs, trace minerals, benzene, MER, solvents (Varsols), plasticizers, vinyl chloride, and plastic organic solvents. Only four respondents were able to correctly identify chemicals currently found at the site, this indicates that there needs to be a better education and communication describing the chemicals found on site and what health effects they might impose.

The most common concern mentioned was with the contamination of water, especially with Rockwood Brook and Sand Dam Pond, run off water from the Troy Mill Landfill Site and how it will affect groundwater, the water table, (aquifer) and nearby wells. The clarification of theses environmental media need to be defined especially since the terms ground water, aquifer, and water table were used in many different contexts.

The most common physical hazards identified at the Troy Mills Landfill Site were leaking, half buried barrels, a bluish tint in ground water, exposed carpet and vinyl scraps, and broken glass found along the Rockwood Brook.

Several residents (29.4%) were interested in having their family physicians informed about any potential health problems linked to previously disposed chemical found at the Troy Mills Landfill site.

Associated Health Risks

Needs assessment recipients were asked, "What recreational activities near the Site do you feel are putting you at risk?" Over half (59.4%) indicated that they use trails on and around the Site. Some indicated walking and hiking on the trails while others stated the use of ATVs, snowmobiles, and dirt bikes. Another concern that respondents have is with recreational activities that take place in Rockwood Brook and more specifically at Sand Dam Pond. Many mentioned concerns with swimming at this site along with canoeing and fishing.

At the end of the survey, respondents were given an opportunity to ask health-related questions or to add their main concerns regarding the Troy Mills Landfill Site. The need assessment survey responses have been retained by the Bureau of Environmental and Occupational Health. For the purpose of the summary the questions have been paraphrased to protect the respondents' identity and to maintain confidentiality and to insure that the questions could be included and addressed in the Public Health Assessment.

Sources of Information

Ninety four percent of the time respondents (94.1%) prefer to receive news about their local community by mail. The commonly read papers include The Keene Sentinel, the Troy Town News. Other methods identified to receive information include community meeting, email, telephone and cable in order of preference.

Summary of Community Concerns

The following is a list of questions that was compiled using the written survey and public availability session.

Health Concerns

Cancer and Respiratory Illness
  1. Does the town of Troy have higher respiratory disease rates than other towns?
  2. Are there more cases of cancer in Troy than other surrounding towns?
Children and Families
  1. Is it safe for my children to swim in Sand Dam pond?
General Health Questions
  1. Are the chemicals on the site dangerous?
  2. What health risks are associated with the chemicals found at the landfill?
  3. How can I avoid these health risks?
  4. How are the chemicals being disposed of, what is happening to them?
Nature of Contamination
  1. What will happen to people who were exposed to these chemicals in the past?
Extent of Contamination
  1. What are the effects of the chemicals on the water quality in wells, the public water supply, and Sand Dam Pond?
Future Exposures
  1. Will these chemicals have a long-term effect on our health?
  2. Is there any future risk that exists for our water supply?
  3. How will the water to the south branch of the Ashuelot Fishery be affected?
Testing
  1. Is there any test that can measure if a person has been exposed?
  2. What kinds of test are being done to identify if there are any concerns?
Other
  1. Please keep us informed.
  2. How can we maintain a successful summer recreation program is the Sand Dam Pond safe for such activities?
Conclusions From Health Promotion Advisor
  • More education on the chemicals present at the site, and the health concerns related to these chemicals needs to be presented to the residents of Troy Mills.
  • The local papers, including the Troy Town News and The Keene Sentinel, are the most effective way to alert residents about this information on the Troy Mills Landfill site.
Recommendations from Health Promotion Advisor
  • A fence should be placed around the perimeter of the property, especially the 1-acre area where the exposed barrels' run-off water is found.
  • Signs should be posted around the perimeter to keep foot traffic and all-terrain vehicles off the affected area of the site.
  • A clear explanation of the status of the site and the chemicals that are on the site, along with any health risk, should be communicated to the community via The Keene Sentinel and the Troy Town News.
  • "Water table," "aquifer," and "water table" should be defined in the public health assessment.
  • In the education meeting and in the fact sheets offered to citizens, it should be clearly stated that the Troy Mills Landfill site is private property and therefore any crossing is considered to be trespassing.
Community Needs Assessment [PDF, 144 KB]

Detailed Findings of the Community Educational Needs Assessment, Troy Mills, Troy, New Hampshire

Public Availability Sessions
Day Date Time # of Attendees
Tuesday September 23, 2003 6-8 PM 10


Survey Response Rate
Surveys Distributed 1,010
Surveys Returned 34
Return Rate 3.4%


Demographic Information

Question 1.

How long have you lived at this address?
Length of Residency Responses %
Less than 5 years 4 11.7
5-10 years 10 29.4
11-20 years 8 23.5
21-30 years 5 14.7
31-40 years 5 14.7
41-50 years 1 2.9
50+ years 0 0
No response 1 2.9
Total 34 99.8
(0-10 years: 41.1 %; 11+ years 58.8 %.)


Question 2.

Is this a seasonal home?
Responses # %
Seasonal 0 0
Year Round 33 97.1
No response 1 2.9
Total 34 100


Question 3.

Do you have children 6 years old or younger living with you?
Responses # %
Families with Children Age 6 and Under 7 20.6
No children 27 79.4
Total 34 100


Question 4.

How would you like to receive information about the Troy Mills Site?
Responses # %
Telephone 4 8.5
Mail 32 94.1
Newspapers 14 41.1
Cable / TV 1 0.03
Community Meeting 8 23.5
Newspapers: The Keene Sentinel, Troy Town News, and Monadnock Shopper


Question 5.

To help us determine what you already know about the Site, please tell us what you have heard about the chemicals that have been found at this Site?
Chemicals are contained in a 1 acre area
Area will be capped off and contained
The chemicals are carcinogenic
Chemicals used to make vinyls
Lots of barrels on-site, anywhere from 1,000-10,000
Barrels containing chemicals are leaking or have leaked already
Chemicals consist of PCBs, trace minerals, toxic chemicals, benzene, and MER
Possible contamination of Sand Dam Pond
People in area have brain tumors because of chemicals
Chemicals may enter into the water table
Chemicals found consist of Varsols, plasticizers, vinyl chloride, and plastic organic solvents
Chemicals leaking into soil
MEC, PVC
All of the chemicals found cause disease
We've been told the area has been tested and it is safe, is it?
The chemicals are toxic, will spread and travel, doesn't evaporate, long lasting


Question 5B.

How did you hear about the chemicals?
Newspapers (The Keene Sentinel, Troy Town News) 18
Word of mouth 6
Town officials (Public Meetings) 5
Past employee 4
EPA briefing 3
Seen it 2
Original study 1


Question 5C.

What health impacts or effect have you heard about?
None given 9
Cancer (brain tumors, dysplasia) 5
None on humans (what about the animals?, no native fish!) 3
Psychological, mental 1
Filters on wells because of it 1
All 65
No response 9


Question 5D.

How did you hear about these impacts or effects?
Chemicals are contained in a 1 acre area
Area will be capped off and contained
The chemicals are carcinogenic
Chemicals used to make vinyls
Lots of barrels on-site, anywhere from 1,000-10,000
Barrels containing chemicals are leaking or have leaked already
Chemicals consist of PCBs, trace minerals, toxic chemicals, benzene, and MER


Question 6.

Do you or any children in your home?
Responses # %
Walk or play on the Troy Mills Site property? 8 23.5
Walk or play in the woods or on trails around the Site? 18 52.9
Play or wade in the Rockwood Brook? 6 17.6
Play, wade or swim in the Sand Dam Pond? 15 44.1
Eat fish from Rockwood Brook? 6 17.6
Eat fish from Sand Dam Pond? 4 11.8
Use the brook or pond for other purposes? 8 23.5


Question 7.

Have you seen anything near or on the Troy Mills Site that could cause you harm?
Response # %
Yes 9 26.5
No 22 64.7
No Response 3 8.8
Total 34 100


Comments:
  • I have never been near the Site.
  • Strangely, unnatural colored water at Site and in Rockwood Brook
  • Spillage in wetlands, eventually leading down to Sand Dam Pond
  • Scrap metal and half buried debris
  • Many barrels exposed
  • Lots of litter, including broken glass, car parts, etc.
  • Orange film on the sand at Sand Dam Pond


Question 8.

Do you feel outdoors activities near the Site are putting you at risk?
Response # %
Yes 20 58.8
No 12 35.3
No response 2 5.9
Total 34 100


Comments:
  • Fishing, swimming
  • Personal wells should be tested during summer along with Pond
  • Still apprehensive about Pond even with testing
  • Swimming, absorption through skin
  • Gardening, water on garden to vegetables
  • Walking and hiking
  • Using recreational vehicles, ATVs, snowmobiles, dirt bikes


Question 9.

Have you smelled odors coming from the Site?
Response # %
Yes 6 17.6
No 25 73.5
No response 3 8.8
Total 34 99.9


Comments:
  • Blasts of black smoke into air, soot fallout on cars and houses.
  • The cloud of smoke and dust fallout seems to be worse during the warm months.


Question 10.

What is your general feeling about the Site?
Response # %
It does not affect my health 8 23.5
It does affect my health 11 32.4
I am not sure 15 44.1
Total 84 100


Question 11.

What is your level of interest in this Site?
Response # %
Very interested 27 79.4
Somewhat interested 6 17.6
Not interested 0 0
No response 1 2.9
Total 34 99.9


Comments:
  • I hear loud explosion sounds at night and am unsure what it is.
  • Avoid the area and you will be safe.
  • Cannot protect self from air and smoke that blows around.

Question 12.

Do you have any other health-related questions or concerns about Troy Mills Site that you would like us to discuss in the Public Health Assessment?
Responses
Make those responsible pay for the cleanup
What other tests are being done, other than those on sediments to ensure that the water at Rockwood Brook and Sand Dam Pond are safe?
What about the aquifer?
What about the mill building, is it safe, or is there contamination there as well?
How are the barrels being disposed of?
Will this affect us in the future?
Tell us more and please explain.
Please give a general description of the known health risk of the main chemicals.
What is the future risk to the water table and the south branch of the Ashuelot Fishery?
What are the effects of pollution on water quality in area wells and Sand Dam Pond?


Would you like your physician to be added to our mailing list?
Response # %
Yes 43 38.7


Appendix F :

ATSDR Public Health Hazard Categories
CATEGORY / DEFINITION DATA SUFFICIENCY CRITERIA
A. Urgent Public Health Hazard
This category is used for sites where short-term exposures (< 1 year) to hazardous substances or conditions could result in adverse health effects that require rapid intervention.
This determination represents a professional judgment based on critical data which ATSDR has judged sufficient to support a decision. This does not necessarily imply that the available data are complete; in some cases additional data may be required to confirm or further support the decision made. Evaluation of available relevant information* indicates that site-specific conditions or likely exposures have had, are having, or are likely to have in the future, an adverse impact on human health that requires immediate action or intervention. Such site-specific conditions or exposures may include the presence of serious physical or safety hazards.
B. Public Health Hazard
This category is used for sites that pose a public health hazard due to the existence of long-term exposures (> 1 year) to hazardous substance or conditions that could result in adverse health effects.
This determination represents a professional judgment based on critical data which ATSDR has judged sufficient to support a decision. This does not necessarily imply that the available data are complete; in some cases additional data may be required to confirm or further support the decision made. Evaluation of available relevant information* suggests that, under site-specific conditions of exposure, long-term exposures to site-specific contaminants (including radionuclides) have had, are having, or are likely to have in the future, an adverse impact on human health that requires one or more public health interventions. Such site-specific exposures may include the presence of serious physical or safety hazards.
C. Indeterminate Public Health Hazard
This category is used for sites in which critical data are insufficient with regard to extent of exposure and/or toxicologic properties at estimated exposure levels.
This determination represents a professional judgment that critical data are missing and ATSDR has judged the data are insufficient to support a decision. This does not necessarily imply all data are incomplete; but that some additional data are required to support a decision. The health assessor must determine, using professional judgment, the criticality of such data and the likelihood that the data can be obtained and will be obtained in a timely manner. Where some data are available, even limited data, the health assessor is encouraged to the extent possible to select other hazard categories and to support their decision with clear narrative that explains the limits of the data and the rationale for the decision.
D. No Apparent Public Health Hazard
This category is used for sites where human exposure to contaminated media may be occurring, may have occurred in the past, and/or may occur in the future, but the exposure is not expected to cause any adverse health effects.
This determination represents a professional judgment based on critical data which ATSDR considers sufficient to support a decision. This does not necessarily imply that the available data are complete; in some cases additional data may be required to confirm or further support the decision made. Evaluation of available relevant information* indicates that, under site-specific conditions of exposure, exposures to site-specific contaminants in the past, present, or future are not likely to result in any adverse impact on human health.
E: No Public Health Hazard
This category is used for sites that, because of the absence of exposure, do NOT pose a public health hazard.
Sufficient evidence indicates that no human exposures to contaminated media have occurred, none are now occurring, and none are likely to occur in the future.  
*Such as environmental and demographic data; health outcome data; exposure data; community health concerns information; toxicologic, medical, and epidemiologic data; monitoring and management plans.


Appendix G : Written Comments on Public Comment Release

On July 22, 2004, BEOH released the Draft Public Health Assessment for the Troy Mills Landfill (TML) Site for public comment. The public comment period for the draft document lasted 1 month (July 22, 2004 to August 23, 2004). To facilitate comments, the draft public health assessment was posted on the DES website. In addition, 33 print copies were dispersed between the Troy Town Hall, Fitzwilliam Town Hall, and Gaye-Kimball Library in Tory. Forty-seven print copies of the document were distributed to residents who attended the EPA informational meeting held at the Meadowood Assembly Hall in Fitzwilliam that evening.

Local residents were encouraged to submit their comments and questions about the document to BEOH. These comments have been transcribed or paraphrased in the next section. Each comment is followed by a response from BEOH.
  1. What will happen to the contaminated water already west of the TML?

    As indicated in the Exposure Pathways Analysis Section (Section III C.) of the public health assessment, groundwater beneath the drum disposal area of the TML has been contaminated by a number of chemicals and flows in a west and northwesterly direction toward Rockwood Brook. No one has used, or is currently using, this groundwater as a drinking water source. Likewise, past sampling of surface water in the area adjacent to the drum disposal area has shown the presence of low levels of VOCs and other contaminants. The EPA is preparing to conduct a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study at the TML that will determine what action will be taken to address the environmental contamination associated with the site.

  2. Are there raised levels of cancer in the area as shown in the NH State Cancer Registry? These figures should be included in the report. The reference to the Registry provides insufficient information for the report.

    The public health assessment states that, in the past, area residents may have been exposed to low levels of contaminants in surface water and sediments in the wetlands adjacent to the drum disposal area. Contaminant levels were low and there were limited opportunities for individuals to actually be exposed (have physical contact) to these chemical contaminants. BEOH considers it unlikely that any adverse health effects, including cancer, would occur as a result of these exposures. Since an increase in environmentally-related disease would not be expected as a result of contamination at the TML, BEOH did not provide any evaluation of cancer rates for the communities of either Troy or Fitzwilliam.

    Information about cancer and cancer statistics from the New Hampshire State Cancer Registry are made available by the Bureau of Health Statistics and Data Management. Residents, who are interested in the actual cancer rates for these communities, or any area of the state, should telephone this Bureau directly at (603) 271-5926 or toll-free at 800-852-3345, ext. 5926.

  3. Does the Temporary By-Pass trail rejoin the trail well before Water Street in Troy as it appears on the maps provided at the meeting? If so, it is a dangerous situation to have residents, mainly children, sharing the rail trail with the large trucks coming and going from TML. I live not far from the dam, and we note with pleasure the number of children who enjoy swimming off the dam. They get to the dam by walking or riding their bikes up the rail trail.

    Yes, the trail is as depicted on the map. All the parties involved in the planning (New Hampshire Department of Resources and Economic Development, EPA and DES) recognized the situation and that is why the by-pass trail was constructed. As stated in the Traffic Control Plan for the Troy Mills Landfill, transporting materials off-site for disposal will be limited between 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. on weekdays, while schools are in session. Also, transporting materials on weekends is going to be minimized, as much as possible, to avoid disruptions to the community. Truck traffic leaving the TML during the EPA removal action will be monitored by the local Police Department. The EPA will consult with local officials on any proposed changes to the traffic schedule.

    The Cheshire Branch Rail Trail is operated by the New Hampshire Department of Resources and Economic Development (DRED). Questions about use of the trail system should be addressed to DRED's Trails Bureau, at telephone (603) 271-3254 or through their website at www.trails.org.

  4. On page seven, you noted that all terrain vehicles use the rail trail. ATVs are not allowed on the trail. As a matter of fact, no motorized vehicles are allowed except snowmobiles. It is, however, common knowledge that ATVs have used the sand pit and adjacent areas for recreation.

    The rail trail is in fact closed to motorized use during the non-snow seasons. Use of ATVs on properties abutting the state owned trail is determined by the landowners. It should be noted that while the EPA removal action is underway, security will be provided at the drum disposal area. Public access to this area will be restricted until the work is completed.


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