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PUBLIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT

SUNFLOWER ARMY AMMUNITION PLANT
DESOTO, JOHNSON COUNTY, KANSAS


TABLES

Table 1.

Evaluation of Potential Public Health Hazards at Sunflower Army Ammunition Plant
Site Site Description/Waste Disposal History Investigation Results/Environmental Monitoring Results Corrective Activities and/or Current Status Evaluation of Public Health Hazard
Solid Waste Management Unit
(SWMU)-001 Classification Area
This 42-acre area is located along the railroad yard in the northeastern portion of Sunflower Army Ammunition Plant (SFAAP). Since 1942, incoming raw materials have been sorted here for distribution to the appropriate receiving facility. No hazardous wastes were produced here, however, some of the incoming raw materials were classified as hazardous. Groundwater: No semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) or inorganics were detected above comparison values (CVs).

Surface Water: Thallium (0.0011 ppm) was detected above its CV.

Surface Soil: Arsenic (7.3 ppm) and iron (34,000 ppm) were detected above CVs. Phenanthrene (3.4 ppm) does not have a CV.

Sediment: Arsenic (5.7 ppm) and iron (24,000 ppm) were detected above CVs.

Current Phase: RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) Feasibility Investigation (RFI)

The draft RFI report recommends no further action.

No further investigatory or remedial actions are planned.

This SWMU poses no past, current, or future public health hazards because detected levels are too low to be of health concern. In addition, there is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is expected to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.
SWMU-002
River Water Treatment Plant (RWTP), Lagoons, and Dredged Material
RWTP was operational from 1943 to 1971, and is located in the northern part of SFAAP. Water from the Kansas River was treated by lime addition, sedimentation, carbon filtration, and chlorination. Two unlined lagoons were constructed from RWTP sludge to collect RWTP wastes. Overflow eventually reached the Kansas River via Hansen and Kill Creeks. Occasionally acid was added to the lagoon when the pH was high. The area is contaminated with lime and filter backwash solids from RWTP activities, and nitroguanidine (NQ), acidic wastewater, calcium cyanide, and toxic unionized ammonia from NQ production. Groundwater: Fluoride (1.1 ppm) was detected above its CV.

Surface Water: No inorganics were detected above CVs.

Surface Soil: Arsenic (8.2 ppm) and iron (27,000 ppm) were detected above CVs.

Sludge: Arsenic (12 ppm) and iron (37,000 ppm) were detected above CVs. Guanidine nitrate (GN) [0.9 ppm] does not have a CV.

Current Phase: RFI

Currently, RWTP is used to store well water in settling tanks before being transported to the Well Water Treatment Plant for drinking water production. It is leased to a private firm for commercial agricultural purposes.

Additional sampling is planned for FY 2000. If contamination is found in the sediment, it will be removed to an off-site disposal facility.

Based on current sampling, this SWMU poses no past, current, or future public health hazards because detected levels are too low to be of health concern. In addition, there is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is expected to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

Toxicity data is not available for GN.

SWMU-003
Main Sewage Treatment Plant (STP) and Disposal Pond
The 3-acre STP is located in the northeastern section of SFAAP and has been in operation since 1943. It treats sanitary wastewater with a bar screen, Parshall flume, Inhoff tank, trickling filter, final clarifier, and unlined effluent holding pond. After treatment, water is discharged into Kill Creek. The primary waste treated was domestic sewage, however, wastewater from various production facilities and laboratories was also treated. Surface Water: Dieldrin (0.00007 ppm) was detected above its CV.

Surface Soil: Aldrin (0.18 ppm), chlordane (4.6 ppm), dieldrin (1.1 ppm), and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-1260 (1.4 ppm) were detected above CVs. Phenanthrene (0.09 ppm) does not have a CV.

Sediment: Arsenic (5.1 ppm) was detected above its CV.

Sludge: Aldrin (0.18 ppm), arsenic (3.6 ppm), chlordane (4.6 ppm), dieldrin (1.1 ppm), and PCB-1260 (1.4 ppm) were detected above CVs. Phenanthrene (0.18 ppm) and 4-bromodiphenyl ether (0.345 ppm) do not have CVs.

Current Phase: RFI

According to the RFI report additional sampling is needed to fully delineate the site.

Removal and disposal of existing sludge at the drying beds will continue.

Based on current sampling, this SWMU poses no past, current, or future public health hazards because detected levels are too low to be of health concern. In addition, there is no public access to SFAAP. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is expected to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

Toxicity data is not available for 4-bromodiphenyl ether.

SWMU-004
Pond A and Sludge Disposal Area
The unlined, 86,200-square foot pond was built during the 1940s and is located in the north central portion of SFAAP. Pond A was used for sedimentation of solids and equalization of wastewater from the nitrocellulose (NC) area. It also received wastes from the NQ support area and others, as well as surface runoff from the metal salvage yard, corporation yard, and North Acid Area. These activities contaminated Pond A with nitric and sulfuric acids, NC fines, and acidic sludge neutralized with lime. Occasionally sludge was dredged from Pond A and landfilled in a 6.4-acre area north of the pond. Groundwater: No SVOCs, pesticides, PCBs, or inorganics were detected above CVs.

Sludge: Arsenic (13 ppm), iron (42,000 ppm), and manganese (3,100 ppm) were detected above CVs. Phenanthrene (0.12 ppm) and NC (5,500 ppm) do not have CVs.

Additional sampling to determine the extent of contamination is planned for FY 2000 and 2001.

Current Phase: RFI

Since production ceased in 1971, Pond A has been part of the natural drainage system and has received storm sewer outfall.

SFAAP is planning to close the pond in FY 2004, because of elevated NC concentrations in the sludge.

Based on current sampling, this SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long the sludge is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-005
Pond A Neutralization Area
This area was constructed in 1942 and 1943 on the southeast edge of Pond A to treat acidic wastewater (containing nitric and sulfuric acids and NC fines) from the NC area. The pH of Pond A effluent was neutralized here prior to discharge into Pond B (SWMU-006). Acidic wastewater treated with burnt lime slurry was the main contaminant. Groundwater: No SVOCs, pesticides, PCBs, or inorganics were detected above CVs.

Sludge: Arsenic (13 ppm), iron (42,000 ppm), and manganese (3,100 ppm) were detected above CVs. Phenanthrene (0.12 ppm) and NC (5,500 ppm) do not have CVs.

Current Phase: RFI

About 5,000 cubic yards (y3) of soil will be removed and treated. SFAAP is planning to close the pond in 2004.

This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long the sludge is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-006
Pond B and Sludge Disposal Area
This 9-acre unlined pond is located downstream of Pond A in the east-central part of SFAAP. It was built in the 1940s for sedimentation of solids from the discharge of the Pond A Neutralization Unit (SWMU-005). Sludge were occasionally dredged from Pond B and landfilled west of the pond. It received neutralized wastewater (containing lime sludge) from Pond A and effluent from the Industrial Waste Treatment (IWT) lagoons. The contaminants from IWT depended on the types of additives and coals used. Pond B discharges into Kill Creek and is currently used for detention of runoff, flow control from Pond A, and receiving effluent from the IWT lagoons. Groundwater: Ammonia nitrogen (3.2 ppm), sulfate (810 ppm), and manganese (8.9 ppm) were detected above CVs.

Surface Water: No metals were detected above CVs in the pond. Dieldrin (0.00007 ppm) was detected above its CV in the creek.

Sediment: Arsenic (13 ppm) and iron (29,000 ppm) were detected above CVs in the pond. Arsenic (5.1 ppm) was detected above its CV in the creek. NC (540 ppm) does not have a CV.

Sludge: Arsenic (10 ppm) and iron (36,000 ppm) were detected above CVs. NC (920 ppm) does not have a CV.

Additional sampling will be conducted in FY 2001 to determine the extent of contamination.

Current Phase: RFI

About 40,000 y3 of soil will be removed and treated. A pond closure plan will be developed in FY 2004 due to elevated levels of manganese and nitroglycerin in the groundwater and beryllium in the sludge.

Based on current sampling, this SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

Toxicity data is not available for NC.

SWMU-007
North Acid Area - Chromate Area
This half-acre area is located in the north-central section of SFAAP within the North Acid Area. From 1947 to 1948, the North Acid Area manufactured ammonium nitrate liquor. The Chromate Area produced chromium-contaminated wastewater through use of corrosion inhibitors in the cooling tower. The wastewater was collected in a rectangular, concrete basin, and a cylindrical basin with steel casing. Data generated for this SWMU were determined to be unreliable. Resampling is planned for Fiscal Year (FY) 2001. Current Phase: RFI

The area was dismantled in 1958, however, the two basins remain. From 1981 to 1983 the contents of the two basins were pumped into an open metal trough and transported to an off-site disposal area.

This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-008
North Acid Area - Chromate Concentration Pond
The Chromate Concentration Pond was located within the North Acid Area in the north-central part of SFAAP, however, since the pond has since been drained, the exact location is uncertain. The Nitrogen Fixation Plant (located in the North Acid Area) used chromate as a corrosion inhibitor in the cooling tower, and when the plant was dismantled in 1958, the pond and surrounding ground were contaminated. Data generated for this SWMU were determined to be unreliable. Resampling is planned for FY 2001. Current Phase: RFI This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-009
North Acid Area Wastewater Treatment Lagoon
The area is located in the north-central portion of SFAAP within the North Acid Area. It is believed to have similar practices to the South Acid Area, including the addition of lime to the wastewater followed by discharge into a holding pond or lagoon. Calcium sulfate sludges and chromate-contaminated water is believed to be present in this area. Neither the wastewater treatment practices nor the fate of the sludge were documented. Data generated for this SWMU were determined to be unreliable. Resampling is planned for FY 2001. Current Phase: RFI This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-010
F-Line Ditches
The F-Line Area is located in the east-central part of SFAAP. It was an automated roll house where carpet and breaker rolls converted back-process grains into sheet rock. A system of 21 unlined drainage ditches ran from the east side of the F-Line press houses to the settling ponds and then to Spoon and Kill Creeks. Wastewater containing propellant solids [some with lead salts and nitroglycerine (NG)] settled in the ditches. Groundwater: Ammonia nitrogen (11 ppm), cadmium (0.006 ppm), manganese (1.1 ppm), and NG (0.083 ppm) were detected above CVs.

Surface Water: Ammonia nitrogen (4.2 ppm) and sulfate (2,800 ppm) were detected above CVs.

Surface Soil: Arsenic (7.6 ppm), iron (40,000 ppm), lead (5,800 ppm), and NG (970 ppm) were detected above CVs. Phenanthrene (0.055 ppm) and NC (16,000 ppm) do not have CVs.

Sediment: Arsenic (4.3 ppm) and NG (97 ppm) were detected above CVs. NC (1,300 ppm) does not have a CV.

Current Phase: Corrective Measures Investigation (CMI)

About 5,000 y3 of soil will be excavated and removed in FY 2000. Five years of long term monitoring (LTM) is scheduled to begin in FY 2001.

This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-011
F-Line Area Settling Ponds and Blender Ponds
The F-Line Area is located in the east-central section of SFAAP. Wastewater from the F-Line facilities was discharged via drainage ditches into six settling ponds and two blender ponds. The unlined settling ponds were used to allow propellant solids to settle out. The ponds were built in 1943. Six ponds were closed in 1969, the two remaining ponds were abandoned in 1971. The wastewater contained raw and uncolloided propellants contaminated with lead salts, propellant waste, and NC. Groundwater: Ammonia nitrogen (11 ppm), cadmium (0.006 ppm), manganese (1.1 ppm), and NG (0.083 ppm) were detected above CVs.

Surface Water: Ammonia nitrogen (4.2 ppm) and sulfate (2,800 ppm) were detected above CVs.

Surface Soil: Arsenic (7.6 ppm), iron (40,000 ppm), lead (5,800 ppm), and NG (970 ppm) were detected above CVs. Phenanthrene (0.055 ppm) and NC (16,000 ppm) do not have CVs.

Sediment: Arsenic (4.3 ppm) and NG (97 ppm) were detected above CVs. NC (1,300 ppm) does not have a CV.

Current Phase: CMI

About 5,000 y3 of soil will be excavated and removed in FY 2000. Five years of LTM is scheduled to begin in FY 2001.

This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-012
Pyott's Pond and Sludge Disposal Area
This 1.7-acre, unlined pond is located in the east-central part of SFAAP. It was built in 1968 to help with pollution control, and drains into Kill Creek. Pyott's Pond received drainage from the South Acid Area, partially sedimented wastes from the F-Line Paste Area, wastes from the NC Area, drainage from the Solvent Area, and untreated wastewater from the NG Area. Approximately 9 acres of dredged sludge (containing calcium sulfate) was landfilled to the north and south of the pond. PCBs may have been discharged here. Groundwater: Sulfate (470 ppm) was detected above its CV.

Surface Water: 1,1,2-trichloroethane (0.003 ppm) was detected above its CV.

Surface Soil: Arsenic (3.8 ppm) was detected above its CV. NC (120 ppm) does not have a CV.

Sediment: Arsenic (8.7 ppm) and benzo(a)pyrene (0.27 ppm) were detected above CVs. Phenanthrene (0.16 ppm) and NC (35 ppm) do not have CVs.

Additional sampling will be conducted to fully define the extent of contamination in FY 2001.

Current Phase: RFI

Pyott's Pond currently receives neutralized acid from the South Acid Area and was used for flow control and emergency containment for Koch Industries acid manufacturing.

SFAAP is planning to close the pond and about 7,000 y3 of soil will be removed and treated in FY 2003. Five years of LTM is scheduled to begin in FY 2004.

This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-013
South Area Liquid Waste Treatment Plant (LWTP) and Evaporative Lagoons
This area is located in the east-central portion of SFAAP and was first used in 1979. It consists of five above ground tanks and four unlined evaporative lagoons. LWTP receives corrosive wastewater from the acid production area (containing sulfuric and nitric acids, nitrates, and sulfates) and the sulfuric acid concentration unit (containing residual NG or GN). Lime is added to neutralize the acid and the water is heated to destroy NQ. The evaporative lagoons settle out the resulting calcium sulfate sludge. Groundwater: Nitrate/nitrite (680 ppm) and sulfate (1,300 ppm) were detected above CVs.

Surface Water: Manganese (0.89 ppm), nitrate/nitrite (1,000 ppm), and sulfate (1,000 ppm) were detected above CVs.

Surface Soil: Arsenic (5.4 ppm) and iron (24,000 ppm) were detected above CVs.

Sludge: Arsenic (5.4 ppm) and iron (24,000 ppm) were detected above CVs.

Current Phase: LTM

According to a remediation schedule submitted by SFAAP and approved by KDHE in March 1996, the sludge is to be remediated, the lagoons closed, and groundwater monitored for a minimum of 5 years.

This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the groundwater and surface water are cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-014
Rocket Static Test Area
This 3-acre area is located in the northeastern part of the Proving Ground Area, which is in the east-central portion of SFAAP. Four firing platforms are located adjacent to two Proving Ground buildings. The 1-centimeter diameter rocket propellant grains were tested for acceptance here. Approximately 79,500 test firings were conducted from 1965 to 1971. Propellant may be present at this site. Groundwater: No metals were detected above CVs.

Surface Water: No metals were detected above CVs.

Surface Soil: Arsenic (6.1 ppm), bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (140 ppm), cadmium (1,700 ppm), copper (6,200 ppm), iron (33,000 ppm), lead (1,100 ppm), and NG (320 ppm) were detected above CVs. NC (3,700 ppm) does not have a CV.

Sediment: Arsenic (59.7 ppm), iron (144,000 ppm), and manganese (8,450 ppm) were detected above CVs. NC (2.6 ppm) does not have a CV.

Additional sampling of groundwater, surface water and sediment is planned for FY 2001.

Current Phase: RFI, Corrective Measures Study (CMS) Based on current sampling, this SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the surface soil and sediment are cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-015
Waste Storage Magazines
The area is comprised of nine buildings and is located in the southeastern section of SFAAP. All magazines use natural lighting to prevent accidental detonation of explosives, are secured with locked doors, and have concrete flooring with secondary containment. Six buildings contain production waste from propellant manufacturing (including drums of dry GN waste, off-spec NQ waste, and wet NQ lab waste), one contains spent solvents, and two contain sulfuric acid regeneration boiler ash, explosive waste incinerator ash, explosive waste burning grounds ash, and solid and liquid hazardous wastes. Data generated for this SWMU were determined to be unreliable. Additional sediment sampling will be conducted in FY 2001. Current Phase: RFI This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-016
Temporary Waste Storage Magazines
Five of these buildings are located in the southwest-central part of SFAAP, one is located in the central portion. Over time 550 gallons of spent chlorinated degreasing solvents, 19.8 tons of actual waste and reprocessable material (containing NQ, GN, single and double based propellants, and propellant solids contaminated with lead salts), and 7.3 tons of containerized toxic wastes and nonhazardous sludge was stored in these buildings . In 1990 only one building was pending waste removal, the waste from the other buildings was transferred in 1984 and 1985 to the newly updated Waste Storage Magazines (SWMU-015). Data generated for this SWMU were determined to be unreliable. Resampling is planned for FY 2001. Current Phase: RFI This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-017
G-Line Area Ditches
These ditches are located in the south-central portion of SFAAP. The G-Line Area is an idle solvent propellant area, however, no data are available about the operations. It is assumed that the G-Line Area ditches received the same type of contaminants as the F-Line Area ditches. Lead and propellant solids in the soil and groundwater are likely, and NC spills were reported to have occurred in the 1940's. Data generated for this SWMU were determined to be unreliable. Resampling is planned for FY 2001. Current Phase: RFI This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-018

Old/New Sanitary Landfills

The Sanitary Landfill occupies a 17-acre portion of the total landfill area located one mile west of the NG Area near the central-western border of SFAAP. The Old Landfill was opened in 1943. Although no records are available, it is assumed that it received all kinds of wastes from SFAAP. The New Sanitary Landfill was built in 1967 and has received approximately 791,000 cubic feet of waste containing garbage, trash, some waste sulfur and vanadium pentoxide dust, and reacted carbide and calcium cyanamide. No hazardous wastes are known to be present in the New Sanitary Landfill, however, lead in containers were reportedly buried east of the landfill and two known asbestos landfills are near the New Sanitary Landfill. Groundwater: Nitrate/nitrite (11 ppm) was detected above its CV. Sulfide (15 ppm) does not have a CV.

Surface Water: No inorganics were detected above CVs.

Surface Soil: Arsenic (3.6 ppm) and dioxins/furans (max: 0.355 ppm) were detected above CVs.

Sediment: Arsenic (2.0 ppm) was detected above its CV.

Additional sampling is planned for FY 2002 and 2003 to determine the extent of soil contamination.

Current Phase: RFI

The draft RFI report recommended implementing institutional controls to restrict access and groundwater monitoring to ascertain the need for future action.

Interim remedial actions are planned for FY 2001 to divert groundwater flow and control erosion. Remedial actions that include diverting groundwater flow around the landfill and constructing a landfill cap are planned for FY2006+.

Based on current sampling, this SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the nitrate/nitrite in groundwater is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-019
Ash Landfill
The unlined Ash Landfill occupies a 10-acre portion, north of the Sanitary Landfill. It is within the total landfill area which is located one mile west of the NG Area near the central-western border of SFAAP. This landfill was used before 1966 for disposal of unknown quantities of fly ash from the ash-sluice system and coal fines from the coal pile. Fly ash may contain heavy metals. Groundwater: Nitrate/nitrite (11 ppm) was detected above its CV. Sulfide (15 ppm) does not have a CV.

Surface Water: No inorganics were detected above CVs.

Surface Soil: Arsenic (3.6 ppm) and dioxins/furans (max: 0.355 ppm) were detected above CVs.

Sediment: Arsenic (2.0 ppm) was detected above its CV.

Current Phase: CMS

The draft RFI report recommended implementing institutional controls to restrict access and groundwater monitoring to ascertain the need for future action.

The actions that are planned for SWMU-018 will also apply to this SWMU. In addition, the area of the ash landfill will be excavated and disposed of on site.

Based on current sampling, this SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the nitrate/nitrite in groundwater is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-020
Ash Lagoons and Sludge Disposal Area
The four unlined Ash Lagoons are located just south of Pond A in the north-central part of SFAAP. They have been in operation since 1979 to collect fly ash and bottom ash from the boiler house via an ash-sluice system. The ash wastes settle out in the lagoons and the wastewater is then filtered and recycled back to the boiler house. The lagoons are periodically dredged and landfilled. Fly ash may contain heavy metals. Data generated for this SWMU were determined to be unreliable. Resampling is planned for FY 2001. Current Phase: CMS

The draft RFI report recommended closure of the lagoon.

This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. Groundwater under SFAAP is not used for drinking. There is no public access at SFAAP. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

*Unlined lagoons present a pathway for contamination to migrate into the groundwater.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-021
Contaminated Materials Burning Ground
This 4-acre site is located in the west central section of SFAAP. It has been operational since 1943 to decontaminate scrap metal and to burn other combustible material that was contaminated with explosives or propellants. Diesel fuel, waste oils and scrap wood are used to ignite the fire. The metal items are salvaged and the ash is transported to the sanitary landfill. Groundwater: Antimony (0.0099 ppm), arsenic (0.012 ppm), manganese (1.4 ppm), and nickel (0.12 ppm) were detected above CVs.

Surface Water: No inorganics were detected above CVs.

Surface Soil: Aldrin (1.2 ppm), antimony (29 ppm), arsenic (30.2 ppm), cadmium (11 ppm), dieldrin (1.1 ppm), dioxins/furans (max: 0.21 ppm), and lead (20,000 ppm) were detected above CVs. Endrin ketone (0.017 ppm), benzo(g,h,i)perylene (0.075 ppm), and phenanthrene (0.069 ppm) do not have CVs.

Sediment: Arsenic (2.0 ppm) was detected above its

Current Phase: RFI

The draft RFI report suggested additional sampling to better define the extent of contamination.

Interim measures are planned for FY 2001 to control hydrocarbon release to the stream.

This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. Groundwater under SFAAP is not used for drinking. There is no public access at SFAAP. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as groundwater and surface soil are cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-022
Old Explosives Waste Burning Ground (OEWBG)
This 7-acre site was in operation from 1943 to 1980 and is located adjacent to the Contaminated Materials Burning Ground (SWMU-021) in the west central part of SFAAP. There are five burning trenches, an NQ dump area, and a lead recovery area (SWMU-032) at OEWBG. NG mixed with sawdust and various propellant formulations from the sumps, filters, and drains in the production areas were burned on designated pads. Groundwater: Nickel (0.21 ppm) was detected above its CV.

Surface Water: No inorganics were detected above CVs.

Surface Soil: Arsenic (21 ppm), cadmium (19 ppm), dioxins/furans (max: 0.000011 ppm), iron (83,000 ppm), lead (15,500 ppm), manganese (7,900 ppm), and NG (140 ppm) were detected above CVs. NC (2,500 ppm) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (2.7 ppm) do not have CVs.

Sediment: Arsenic (2.2 ppm) was detected above its CV.

Current Phase: RFI (Stream Study)

A CMS is planned for FY 2000 to treat contaminated soil. LTM is scheduled to begin in FY 2001.

This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the surface soil is cleaned to appropriate standards..

SWMU-023
New Explosives Waste Burning Ground
This operation replaced OEWBG (SWMU-022) in 1980. It is located in the west central portion of SFAAP and consists of an earthen pad 130 by 340 feet. Up to 5,000 pounds of wastes (including NQ, GN, explosives, and propellant solids containing lead salts) can be burned and/or detonated on this pad at one time. Groundwater: No metals were detected above CVs.

Surface Soil: Arsenic (9.04 ppm) and iron (25,500 ppm) were detected above CVs.

Resampling is planned for FY 2001.

Current Phase: Response Complete (RC)

The site is being closed under the open burning/ open detonation program.

This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access at SFAAP. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated. The levels of arsenic in the soil are below KDHE's standards for residential use.

SWMU-024
NG Ditches
The NG area is located in the west central part of SFAAP, and was in operation from prior to the end of World War II to 1971. Six buildings each had its own unlined tributary ditch that ran into Kill Creek before the construction of Pyott's Pond, and into the pond after its construction. The ditches received untreated slightly acidic rinse water, soda ash wash, and water used for cleaning the floors and equipment. Spills of one to two pounds and one spill of 1,200 pounds in 1944 occurred onto the soil in the NG area. Groundwater: Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (0.0051 ppm), nitrate/nitrite (16 ppm), and thallium (0.001 ppm) were detected above CVs.

Surface Water: Arsenic (0.015 ppm), lead (0.025 ppm), and manganese (3.9 ppm) were detected above CVs.

Surface Soil: Arsenic (7.3 ppm) and lead (2,100 ppm) were detected above CVs. NC (7.9 ppm) does not have a CV.

Sediment: Arsenic (11 ppm), benzo(a)pyrene (0.13 ppm), and manganese (6,000 ppm) were detected above CVs. NC (4.7 ppm) does not have a CV.

Additional soil sampling is planned for FY 2001 and 2002 to determine the extent of contamination.

Current Phase: RFI

The draft RFI report recommended remediation for this site.

Contaminated materials will be excavated, treated, and removed to an off-site disposal facility in FY 2004. LTM is scheduled to begin in FY 2005.

This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. Groundwater under SFAAP is not used for drinking. There is no public access at SFAAP. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-025
NC Area Ditches
The NC area was operational from 1942 to 1960 and from 1965 to 1971, and is located in the north central section of SFAAP. Wastes (containing suspended fibers) from the production of NC were combined with acid wash waters and released into these open drainage ditches that lead to Pond A. Data generated for this SWMU were determined to be unreliable. Resampling is planned for FY 2001. Current Phase: RFI This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-026
Single Base Area Wastewater Settling Sumps
This area is located in the north-central part of SFAAP, and periodically produced single-base propellant for small arms, cannons, and rockets from 1943 to 1971. Four different types of production buildings are at the site, each with its own sump or flow equalization tank. Wastewater from the sumps and tanks were discharged to open ditches that drained mostly in Captain Creek, but some lead to Pond A. Data generated for this SWMU were determined to be unreliable. Resampling is planned for FY 2001. Current Phase: RFI

Some of the buildings have been removed.

This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-027
NQ Area Sulfuric Acid Concentrator (SAC) Liquid Waste Treatment Plant (LWTP)/ SAC Evaporative Lagoons
The NQ area is located in the northwest portion of SFAAP. The SAC LWTP began operation in 1984 and consists of a 45,000-gallon tank for distillate from the SAC and a 17,000-gallon tank for other corrosives from NQ production. The wastewater from SAC and NQ production may contain NQ and GN. Lime is added to the acidic wastewater and then discharged into two lined evaporative lagoons. The lagoons are south of LWTP and encompass at total of 11.8 acres. In 1987, the linings of the lagoons appeared to be damaged and were replaced. Releases to the underlying soil occurred from one of the lagoons. Groundwater: Nitrate/nitrite (520 ppm), NQ (2.7 ppm), and sulfate (570 ppm) were detected above CVs.

Surface Water: Ammonia nitrogen (10 ppm), manganese (0.79 ppm), nitrate/nitrite (850 ppm), and NQ (1.2 ppm) were detected above CVs. GN (9.6 ppm) does not have a CV.

Surface Soil: Arsenic (7.7 ppm) was detected above its CV. GN (23 ppm) does not have a CV.

Current Phase: LTM

In 1996, under an agreement with KDHE, the sludge was remediated and the lagoons closed and capped. Groundwater will be monitored for a minimum of 5 years.

This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-028
Waste Calcium Carbide Treatment Area
The waste calcium carbide treatment pad area was approximately 55 feet by 114 feet and is located on the northwest portion of SFAAP. Two tons of waste calcium carbide could be treated on the pad. Water was added to the calcium carbide and the resulting reaction released acetylene gas. Runoff from the treatment pad flowed into a tank and then into an evaporation lagoon that was 41,800 square feet. The wastes and runoff contained cyanide, nitroguanidine, guanidine nitrate and calcium carbide.   This SWMU has received "clean closure" from EPA and KDHE. No further action is planned. This SWMU poses no past, current, or future public health hazards because the site is clean. In addition, there is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is expected to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.
SWMU-029
Industrial Wastewater Treatment Lagoons
SWMU 29 consists of four unlined lagoons that are located in the northeast portion of SFAAP. Lagoon 165-7 receives coal pile runoff and wastewater from the powerhouses. Wastewater is pH adjusted prior to entering the lagoon. Effluent from this lagoon enters either one or both of Lagoons 165-5N or 165-5S. The pH of the water is raised to precipitate iron. Effluent from these lagoons flows into Lagoon 165-6 where the pH is lowered. Effluent from this lagoon flows into Pond B (SWMU 6).   This SWMU has received "clean closure" from EPA and KDHE. No further action is planned. This SWMU poses no past, current, or future public health hazards because the site is clean. In addition, there is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is expected to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.
SWMU-030
Pesticide Handling Area
This area is located in the north central part of SFAAP. A new Pesticide Storage building that meets USAEHA Criteria for Design of a Pest Control Shop, Pesticide Storage and Mixing Facility replaced an old building in 1984. The facility is used to store and mix pesticides and herbicides. Reportedly, all liquid from the sumps is recycled, and no discharge, spills, or releases have been reported. Data generated for this SWMU were determined to be unreliable. Resampling is planned for FY 2001. Current Phase: RFI

The old facility and surrounding area reportedly went through a cleanup of pesticide residues before the construction of the new facility.

This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-031
Contaminated Waste Processor (CWP)/ Evaporative Lagoon
The CWP began operation in 1985 and is located in the central section of SFAAP near the western border. It incinerates wastes contaminated with explosives and decontaminates explosive-contaminated metals prior to salvage. The CWP can incinerate waste up to 600 pounds per hour or decontaminate metal up to 8,000 pounds per hour. It is possible that trace concentrations of explosives and propellant compounds (NG, dinitrotoluene, and soluble lead) will be present after incineration. The Evaporative Lagoon is northwest of CWP and was designed to collect runoff from the CWP storage area and wastewater from building washdown. Surface Water: No SVOCs were detected above CVs.

Surface Soil: No explosives or SVOCs were detected above CVs. GN (1.4 ppm) does not have a CV.

Sludge: No SVOCs were detected above CVs.

Additional sampling will be conducted in FY 2001 and 2002 to determine the extent of contamination.

Current Phase: RFI

The draft RFI report noted a data gap and recommended that this SWMU be analyzed for metals.

Excavation, treatment, and disposal is planned for FY 2003 and 2004. The lagoon will be closed under State closure guidelines in FY 2003 or 2004.

Based on current sampling, this SWMU poses no past, current, or future public health hazards because detected levels are too low to be of health concern. In addition, there is no public access to SFAAP. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is expected to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

Toxicity data is not available for GN.

SWMU-032
Lead Decontamination and Recovery Unit
This unit is located in the central part of SFAAP close to its western boundary, and borders the Captain Creek flood plain. It was operational from 1943 to 1970, and consisted of a small building and a melting rack with a paved area. Lead was recovered from the acid, NG, and propellant manufacturing buildings, placed on a rack over a tank, melted into the tank, and molded for salvage. Groundwater: Nickel (0.21 ppm) was detected above its CV.

Surface Water: No inorganics were detected above CVs.

Surface Soil: Arsenic (21 ppm), cadmium (19 ppm), dioxins/furans (max: 0.000011 ppm), iron (83,000 ppm), lead (15,500 ppm), manganese (7,900 ppm), and NG (140 ppm) were detected above CVs. NC (2,500 ppm) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (2.7 ppm) do not have CVs.

Sediment: Arsenic (2.2 ppm) was detected above its CV.

Current Phase: RFI (Stream Study)

A CMS is complete. Soil contaminated with lead will be excavated, treated, and disposed of off-site in FY 2000. LTM is scheduled to begin in FY 2001.

This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the surface soil is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-033
Paste Area Half Tanks and Settling Ponds
The Paste Area is located in the central portion of SFAAP just northeast of the NG area. The ten steel Half Tanks were used to receive wastewater from wash down of propellant processing equipment and buildings from the mid-1960s to 1971. Two unlined settling ponds were used to allow particulate explosive material a second chance to settle. Effluents from these ponds were discharged to Pyott's Pond. Data generated for this SWMU were determined to be unreliable. Current Phase: CMS

Interim remedial actions are planned for FY 2001 to control potential releases of hazardous chemicals. Excavation, treatment, and disposal of soil and piping is planned for FY 2002.

This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-034
Five Corners Settling Ponds
These two unlined ponds are located in the central part of SFAAP, immediately south of the Paste Area (SWMU-033) and immediately east of the NG Area. They were periodically used from the early 1950s to 1971 and received wastewater from the wash down of equipment and buildings, and from sprinkler trips. The ponds may contain partially colloided, uncolloided and raw propellant solids, lead salts, soil, paste, wax, soda ash wash, slightly acidic rinse water, and carbon black from the wastewater it received. Data generated for this SWMU were determined to be unreliable. Current Phase: CMS

Interim remedial actions are planned for FY 2001 to control potential releases of hazardous chemicals. Excavation, treatment, and disposal of soil and piping is planned for FY 2002.

This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-035
Nitroglycerin Area Settling Ponds
The NG Area Settling Ponds are located in the central section of SFAAP, at the northeastern edge of the NG Area just north of the Paste Area (SWMU-033). They were periodically used from the early 1950s to 1971 to receive wastewater from the wash down of equipment and buildings, and from sprinkler trips. The sludge, containing lead salts, was occasionally dredged and burned at the burning grounds. Partially colloided propellant solids also settled in these ponds. Data generated for this SWMU were determined to be unreliable. Current Phase: CMS

Interim remedial actions are planned for FY 2001 to control potential releases of hazardous chemicals. Excavation, treatment, and disposal of soil and piping is planned for FY 2002.

This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-036
N-Line Area
This area is located in the south central part of SFAAP. The N-Line Area was in operation from 1943 to 1946, 1951 to 1960, and 1965 to 1971 to complete the final machining and inspection of extruded and cut propellant grains. Wastewater from floor and equipment washing drained into about 20 unlined drainage ditches that lead into a tributary of Spoon Creek. Wastewater containing propellant solids (some with lead salts and NG) settled in the ditches. Groundwater: Cadmium (0.006 ppm), manganese (3.8 ppm), and sulfate (810 ppm) were detected above CVs.

Surface Water: Manganese (0.58 ppm) was detected above its CV.

Surface Soil: Arsenic (20 ppm), benzo(a)pyrene (0.37 ppm), iron (56,000 ppm), and manganese (15,000 ppm) were detected above CVs. Phenanthrene (0.78 ppm) does not have a CV.

Sediment: Arsenic (18 ppm), iron (42,000 ppm), and manganese (4,000 ppm) were detected above CVs in the creek. Arsenic (16 ppm) was detected above its CV in the ditches. NC (58 ppm) does not have a CV.

Current Phase: RFI

Excavation, treatment, and incineration of contaminated soil and removal of waste propellant from two sumps is planned for FY 2004.

Based on current sampling, this SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-037
Sandblast Area
Sandblasting has occurred in several locations during different periods: east of the Maintenance Office Building 245-3 from 1964 to 1969, west of the Paint and Sign Shop Building 504 from 1980 to 1984, and south of the Equipment Storage Building 566-1 from prior to 1980 to present. Sandblasting was used to prepare equipment for painting and preservation. Most of the sand was recovered and disposed of in the sanitary landfill, however, some sand was left on the ground and since sand was not contained during blasting could have also traveled through the air. Paint wastes and their constituents, especially metals such as lead, chromium, and cadmium are the primary concern at these sites. Data generated for this SWMU were determined to be unreliable. Current Phase: CMS

The draft RFI report recommends institutional controls for this site.

Excavation, treatment, and disposal of 3,000 y3 of contaminated soil is planned for FY 2002.

This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-038
Oil Separator
The Oil Separator was in operation from 1971to 1993 and is located in the north central portion of SFAAP. It consists of an 800-gallon tank located 300 feet southwest of Building 542. The separator received wastewater from the floor drain in car wash bay and from steam radiators that heated the building. When the tank becomes 3/4 full, the liquid was discharged to Pond A via a sewer line, however, the surface drainage was to Pyott's Pond. Oil, grease, solders, and solvents are all common contaminants associated with cleaning and repairing automobiles. Data generated for this SWMU were determined to be unreliable. Additional sampling is planned for FY 2001 and 2002. Current Phase: RFI

The separator has been removed.

The draft RFI report recommends institutional controls for this site.

This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-039
South Acid Area Drainage Ditch and Plant
The South Acid Area is located in the east central section of SFAAP. The Drainage Ditch begins near the Calcium Carbide Disposal Area (SWMU-040) and drains in Pyott's Pond. Sulfuric and nitric acids (containing NG and NQ) were handled at this site. Data generated for this SWMU were determined to be unreliable. Current Phase: CMS (Decision Document)

Additional Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) activities, remedial design, and remedial action, including hot spot soil removal and treatment, is planned for FY 2001.

This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-040
Calcium Carbide Disposal Area
This area is located in the east central part of SFAAP and has a natural ravine that received wastes from the NQ pilot plant for three months in 1982. The waste material (containing calcium cyanamide and calcium fluoride) was later covered to form a landfill and enclosed with a barbed-wire fence. The disposal area is approximately 1 acre located in the northeastern part of the landfill. An evaporation pond was reportedly located in the southwest portion of the landfill. The waste may contain calcium carbonate, nitrate, calcium cyanamide, ammonium, sulfate, GN, and metals. Byproducts are carbide, cyanide, ammonia, and nitrates. Data generated for this SWMU were determined to be unreliable. Additional sampling to define the extent of contamination is planned for FY 2001 and 2002. Current Phase: RFI

The pond is scheduled to be closed according to State closure guidelines in FY 2003. Also, contaminated soils will be excavated, treated, and disposed.

This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-041
Calcium Carbide Cake (CCC) Landfill
This landfill is located in the west central portion of SFAAP. It was operated as a landfill from 1986 to 1988 and from 1992 to present. From 1988 to 1991, the area was provided to farmers rather than landfilled. Containerized and uncontainerized CCC from NQ production was deposited in the landfill. Components present in CCC are calcium carbonate, calcium cyanamide, ammonium, GN, nitrate, sulfate, metals, and fluoride. Data generated for this SWMU were determined to be unreliable. Current Phase: CMI (Operation), LTM

Groundwater monitoring and landfill maintenance will continue.

This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-042
Temporary Sanitary Landfill
This three-cell landfill is located in the west central part of SFAAP, adjacent to the CCC Landfill (SWMU-041). It has been in operation since 1988 and operates under Kansas State Solid Waste Permit No. 340. Non-hazardous wastes consisting of general trash with very little sanitary waste are disposed of here. Initially CCC was landfilled in the first cell, but the practice was stopped. Data generated for this SWMU were determined to be unreliable. Current Phase: CMI (Operation)

Groundwater monitoring and landfill maintenance will continue.

This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-043
Tunnel Dryers (CCC Storage)
There are six Tunnel Dryers that have been used for CCC storage since 1986. Four of the dryers are located in the west central portion of SFAAP, and two are located in the southern portion. The dryers are not enclosed and each has a leachate collection system. The CCC was loaded into dump trucks and transported to the Tunnel Dryers. Ultimately, the product was offloaded from the Tunnel Dryers by vendors. Data generated for this SWMU were determined to be unreliable. Resampling is planned for FY 2001. Current Phase: RFI This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-044
Tank T784
This tank is located in the northwest corner of the NQ Area, which is in the northwest section of SFAAP. Tank T784, also known as Structure 9049, is an above ground, circular, metal wastewater collection tank. It holds cooling tower blowdown water, NQ crystallizer condensate, GN evaporator condensate, and non-contact cooling water. The tank has a 100,000-gallon capacity, however, the effluent pipe activates at 65,000 gallons to discharge wastewater into the RWTP Lagoons (SWMU-002) via an underground transfer line. Breaks in the line and overflow of the tank have been reported. Data generated for this SWMU were determined to be unreliable. Resampling is planned for FY 2001. Current Phase: CMS (Decision Document) This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-045
Building 9040 (Calcium Cyanamide Conveyors & Storage Unit)
Building 9040 is the wet GN building and is located in the central portion of the NQ Area, which is in the northwestern part of SFAAP. Calcium cyanamide is produced in Building 9040 and transferred by conveyor belt to four storage bins east of Building 9040 for use in the GN process. Calcium cyanamide has been released upon transport and carried by the wind to areas that the result is no vegetative cover. Calcium carbide, calcium cyanamide, and calcium fluoride are present in the area. Data generated for this SWMU were determined to be unreliable. Resampling is planned for FY 2001. Current Phase: RFI This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-046
Decontamination Oven
The Decontamination Oven is located in the northeast section of SFAAP. It was built in 1970 and used to decontaminate oversized equipment/materials that were contaminated with trace explosives. The equipment is placed in the oven at a temperature that destroys the explosive contaminants. Trace explosives, volatile contaminants, and metals may be at this site. Data generated for this SWMU were determined to be unreliable. Soil sampling is scheduled for FY 2001. Current Phase: CMS

The draft RFI report recommends institutional controls to protect future workers from lead exposure.

Soil excavation and disposal is planned for FY 2005.

This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-047
NQ Production Area Sumps
The six NQ manufacturing buildings are located in the northwest portion of SFAAP. Production of NQ, calcium cyanamide, and GN began in 1981 and stopped in 1991. Each building has a sump designed to receive wastewater from washdowns, spills, runoff, and non-contact operations. The wastewater may contain NQ, GN, calcium carbide, calcium fluoride, nitrogen, nitrates, ammonia, cyanide, nitric acid, and sulfuric acid. Tank trucks removed wastewater from most of the sumps and transported it to the South Acid Area LWTP. Some sumps are used as holding tanks until the wastewater is pumped to the ammonia stripper for recycling. Groundwater: Barium (0.84 ppm), cadmium (0.006 ppm), manganese (1.5 ppm), nickel (0.64 ppm), NQ (27 ppm), sulfate (290 ppm), and vanadium (0.53 ppm) were detected above CVs. GN (44 ppm) does not have a CV.

Surface Soil: Arsenic (6.7 ppm) was detected above its CV. GN (56 ppm) and NC (6.3 ppm) do not have CVs.

Current Phase: RFI

The draft RFI report recommends additional sampling.

Twenty-three sumps will be excavated and filled with clean soil in FY 2003. An interceptor trench to collect groundwater contaminated with nitrates will be installed in FY 2004. If possible, the water will be used for irrigation.

This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the groundwater and surface soil are cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-048
NQ Support Area
The NQ Support Area is located in the north central part of SFAAP. This is where the pilot-scale production plant, the NQ Support Equipment (NSE) facility, was built from 1977 to 1980. It was operational from 1979 to 1984. In 1984, the main NQ plant began production. Except for Buildings 2000 and 2012, which are periodically used for engineering studies that have generated NQ wastewater, the pilot plant was dismantled. The NQ Support Area consists of two buildings, two dryer bays, two 20,000-gallon above ground storage tanks, two half tanks, and three sumps. Surface runoff discharges into Pond A. Raw materials, manufacturing intermediates, NQ, constituents of byproducts and wastes, and environmental degradation products of these materials (the ultimate product being nitrate) are contaminants of concern at this site. Over the years several spills have been reported. Groundwater: Nitrate/nitrite (14 ppm) and NQ (1.5 ppm) were detected above CVs. GN (2.0 ppm) does not have a CV.

Surface Soil: Arsenic (7.0 ppm) was detected above its CV. NC (2.8 ppm) does not have a CV.

Current Phase: CMS

LTM is planned.

This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the groundwater and surface soil are cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-049
Road Just Southeast of the Sanitary Landfill
The Sanitary Landfill is located near the central western border of SFAAP. Just southeast of the landfill is a road that may have been built over a landfill. Drums, construction rubble, and other refuse underlying the road were revealed upon inspection. Data generated for this SWMU were determined to be unreliable. Additional soil sampling will be conducted in FY 2001 and 2002. Current Phase: RFI This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-050
Disposal Site East of the Classification Yard
Just beyond the eastern boundary of SFAAP, near Kill Creek, an abandoned dump site was discovered. Debris that includes shingles, drums, and metal slag is scattered about the site. Groundwater: No inorganics or SVOCs were detected above CVs.

Surface Water: Thallium (0.0011 ppm) was detected above its CV.

Surface Soil: Arsenic (30 ppm), benz(a)anthracene (2.7 ppm), benzo(a)pyrene (2.9 ppm), benzo(b)fluoranthene (3.6 ppm), cadmium (45 ppm), copper (12,000 ppm), dibenz(a,h)anthracene (0.45 ppm), iron (99,000 ppm), indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene (1.5 ppm), and lead (22,000 ppm) were detected above CVs. Acenaphthylene (0.021 ppm), benzo(g,h,i)perylene (1.6 ppm), phenanthrene (0.79 ppm), and NC (9 ppm) did not have CVs.

Sediment: Arsenic (5.7 ppm) and iron (24,000 ppm)

Current Phase: Interim Remedial Action (IRA)

In 1997 an interim removal was done on a portion of the site.

According to the draft RFI report the site was larger than originally identified, therefore, further removal action will be needed. A CMS is underway to define the work completed and will determine if the presumptive remedy was appropriate.

This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the surface soil is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-051
Battery Handling Area
This area is located in the north central section of SFAAP in the salvage yard. Batteries have been stored in this area for many years. Wastes associated with batteries include acids and metals (particularly mercury, lead and cadmium). Data generated for this SWMU were determined to be unreliable. Current Phase: RFI

Excavation, treatment, and disposal of 3,200 y3 of lead-contaminated soil is planned for FY 2001.

This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-052
Paint Bay Building 542
Building 542 is located in the north central part of SFAAP, and houses a paint bay that was used to repaint vehicles. Fumes and overspray were vented through the side of the building. Wastes associated with paint bays includes volatile organics and metals (particularly chromium, cadmium, and lead). Data generated for this SWMU were determined to be unreliable. SFAAP plans to confirm existing sampling data in FY 2001. Current Phase: CMS (Decision Document)

The draft RFI report recommends no further action.

This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-053
Construction Debris Landfill/ Waste Pit
A sequence of aerial photos taken from 1941 to 1991 show an old waste pile/landfill with two quarries that were most likely used by farmers and during the construction of the plant. In 1997, an inspection revealed that a wood pile is still there, but the road is covered over with vegetation. The landfill appears to begin near the main road by the sewage treatment plant, goes along the fence line, and follows the creek until it reaches the open area where the former quarry exists. Construction debris including heavy duty concrete rubble, rusted out 55-gallon steel drums, glass rubble, broken insulators, pipe debris, wood scraps, telephone poles, wire fencing, concrete pipe pieces, iron scraps, and asbestos materials is present. No sampling has been conducted at this SWMU.

Initial RFI activities will begin in FY 2001. Any contaminated materials will be excavated and disposed of off site.

Current Phase: RFI This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-054
Fluorescent Tube Well
The Fluorescent Tube Well is located in the northwestern section of SFAAP, east of the NQ production area. It belonged to one of the old homesteads prior to SFAAP construction. The well is uncovered, full of water, and has a concrete wall. Prior to 1976, the well was used as a fluorescent tube disposal pit. No sampling has been conducted at this SWMU. Current Phase: IRA

Nine monitoring wells will be installed in FY 2001.

This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-055
Old Administration Building
This site consists of two soil locations within the northeast corner of SFAAP: 1) the soil next to the Old Administration Building has the potential for lead-based paint contamination and 2) activities at the salvage yard affected the soil. No sampling has been conducted at this SWMU. Current Phase: RFI This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-056
Well South of Facility 211
South of Facility 211 nitrate/nitrite contamination was detected in a well. This area in the northeast corner of SFAAP was formerly used for land application of treated waste waters. No sampling has been conducted at this SWMU. Current Phase: RFI This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-057
Facility 507-2
Facility 507-2 (i.e., the Chemical Preparation House) is located in the north central section of SFAAP. It was reported that chemicals were disposed of on the ground outside this facility. No sampling has been conducted at this SWMU. Current Phase: RFI This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-058
Shop Area
The Shop Area, located in the north central part of SFAAP, was used for maintenance activities and repairs. It consists of 30 facilities that include: three offices, the fuel oil unloading station, storage and distribution, 12 storehouses, and nine shops. A former Tram Repair Shop was converted into a Heating Plant. No sampling has been conducted at this SWMU. Current Phase: RFI This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-059
Laundry Area (Facility 214)
The Laundry Facility was used to launder clothing the workers wore on site. The clothing may have been contaminated with process wastes and propellants. The building was located in the north central section of SFAAP and contained a single story with several sumps and drains in a concrete floor. Two fuel oil tanks are located outside. No sampling has been conducted at this SWMU. Current Phase: RFI This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-060
Administration Building 2 (Facility 214)
The Administration Building 2, located in the northeast corner of SFAAP, used to contain a photography lab. Wastes from the lab were disposed of down a sink that would empty into the soil behind the building. No sampling has been conducted at this SWMU. Current Phase: RFI This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-061
Environmental Laboratory (Facility 232)
The Environmental Laboratory is located in the northeast corner of SFAAP. The kinds of waste disposal practices that were used at he Environmental Laboratory are not known. Sumps and drains exist within the building. No sampling has been conducted at this SWMU. Current Phase: RFI This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-062
Transformer Storage Warehouse (Facility 566-5)
This warehouse in the north central part of SFAAP stores replacement transformers. Reportedly all the transformers have been tested and contain less than 50 ppm of PCBs, however, some of the transformers were noticed to be leaking and stains were evident on the concrete floor. No sampling has been conducted at this SWMU. Current Phase: RFI This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-063
Water Towers (Facilities 127-1, 127-2, 127-3, and 127-4)
The area surrounding these four water towers could potentially be contaminated with lead-based paint. The water towers were sandblasted and repainted several times before 1978. Available documentation confirmed that no protective measures were taken to contain the paint removed during or after sandblasting. No sampling has been conducted at this SWMU. Current Phase: RFI This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-064
Disposal Area East of Sewage Treatment Plant
Trenches in the area east of the Sewage Treatment Plant were noticed on aerial photographs. This area may have been the Office Paper Burning Grounds. No sampling has been conducted at this SWMU. Current Phase: RFI This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

SWMU-065
Tank Farm
The Tank Farm is located in the north central part of SFAAP. Numerous releases have been documented in the Tank Farm. No sampling has been conducted at this SWMU. Current Phase: RFI This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

Area of Concern (AOC)-001
Well West of Old Administration Building
Nitrate/nitrite contamination was detected in a well in the area west of the Old Administration Building that used to be located in the northeast corner of SFAAP. No sampling has been conducted at this AOC. Current Phase: RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) This AOC poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

AOC-002
Main Transformer Station (Facility 154-4)
Based on former employee interviews, a fire in 1945 destroyed a number of PCB-containing transformers stored in a building in the northeast corner of SFAAP. No sampling has been conducted at this AOC. Current Phase: RFA This AOC poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

AOC-003
Photographic Laboratory (Facility 227-18)
The Photographic Laboratory was located in the northeast corner of SFAAP. Based on interviews, photography wastes were disposed of into the sinks at the laboratory. It is not known where the outfall of the sink drain is located. No sampling has been conducted at this AOC. Current Phase: RFA This AOC poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

AOC-004
Disposal Area Southwest of Sewage Treatment Plant
Several trenches southwest of the Sewage Treatment Plant were noticed on aerial photographs. This area may have been the Mess Hall Landfill. No sampling has been conducted at this AOC. Current Phase: RFA This AOC poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

AOC-005
Cannon Range Tunnels (Facility 303)
The Cannon Range Tunnels are located in the eastern portion of SFAAP. 55-gallon drums were stored in the southern tunnel. The greatest potential for soil contamination is expected to be along the firing line (i.e., leading from the platforms to the tunnels and within the tunnels). Soil: Explosives and metals were detected during a 1988 Remedial Investigation field program. Current Phase: RFA This AOC poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

AOC-006
Thirty-five Process Facilities within F-line Area
No process history of building use is available for the following 35 facilities: D120-7, F120-4, F120-8, 181-3, 563, 5815-1, 5815-2, 5815-3, 5816-2, 5822, 5823, 5837, 5850, 5861, 7803-1, 7803-2, 7803-3, 7803-4, 7814, 7815-1, 7816-1, 7816-2, 7816-3, 7826, 7827, 7828, 7832, 7866, 7868-1, 7868-2, 7868-3, 7868-4, 7871-2, 7897, and 7898. No sampling has been conducted at this AOC. Current Phase: RFA This AOC poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

AOC-007
Former Truck Maintenance Shop in South Acid Area
A methylene chloride release was detected next to the Former Truck Maintenance Shop in the South Acid Area. No sampling has been conducted at this AOC. Current Phase: RFA This AOC poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

AOC-008
Former Fuel Oil Storage Tank in South Acid Area
A chloroform release was detected next to the Former Fuel Oil Storage Tank in the South Acid Area. No sampling has been conducted at this AOC. Current Phase: RFA This AOC poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

AOC-009
Oil and Paint House in South Acid Area
A methylene chloride release was detected next to the Oil and Paint House in the South Acid Area. No sampling has been conducted at this AOC. Current Phase: RFA This SWMU poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

AOC-010
Storage Magazines not part of SWMUs 15 and 16
This AOC includes the entire former munitions storage and current temporary waste storage area not already covered under SWMUs 15 and 16. It includes 100 storage magazines in the southern end of SFAAP. No sampling has been conducted at this AOC. Current Phase: RFA This AOC poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

AOC-011
Forced Air Dryers and Rest Houses, Screen Houses, and Can Pack Houses
The AOC consists of Forced Air Dryers and Rest Houses, Screen Houses, and Can Pack Houses in the west central section of SFAAP. No sampling has been conducted at this AOC. Current Phase: RFA This AOC poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

AOC-012
Paste Air Dry Facilities
This AOC contains Paste Air Dry Facilities in the central section of SFAAP. No sampling has been conducted at this AOC. Current Phase: RFA This AOC poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

AOC-013
Warehouse with NQ activities
Eight large warehouses, located in the central area of SFAAP, used to store NQ drums, acid plant parts and supplies, and contaminated equipment. No sampling has been conducted at this AOC. Current Phase: RFA This AOC poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

AOC-014
Robert's Lake
Robert's Lake is south of the Old Sanitary Landfill along the western border of SFAAP. It is located downgradient (i.e., west) from the G-line ditches. No sampling has been conducted at this AOC. Current Phase: RFA This AOC poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

AOC-015
Facility 300
An indoor firing range is located within Facility 300, which is located in the center of SFAAP. No sampling has been conducted at this AOC. Current Phase: RFA This AOC poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

AOC-016
NC Production Lines
The NC Production Area is located in the north central section of SFAAP. This AOC contains NC production lines B, C, D, and E and the Solvent Type Propellant Mix and Form Areas. No sampling has been conducted at this AOC. Current Phase: RFA This AOC poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

AOC-017
NQ Production Facilities
This AOC contains all the buildings in the northwest corner of SFAAP that are potentially contaminated with explosives. No sampling has been conducted at this AOC. Current Phase: RFA This AOC poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

AOC-018
Trench Disposal Area west of the Classification Area
A trench disposal area west of the classification area was identified from 1948 aerial photographs. No sampling has been conducted at this AOC. Current Phase: RFA This AOC poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

AOC-019
Disposal Site on the Southwest end of the Classification Area
A disposal site on the southwest end of the classification area was identified from 1948 aerial photographs. No sampling has been conducted at this AOC. Current Phase: RFA This AOC poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

AOC-020
Disposal Pit East of the Classification Area
A disposal pit east of the classification area was identified from 1948 aerial photographs. No sampling has been conducted at this AOC. Current Phase: RFA This AOC poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

AOC-021
Disposal Trench South of the Classification Area
A disposal trench south of the classification area was identified from 1948 aerial photographs. No sampling has been conducted at this AOC. Current Phase: RFA This AOC poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

AOC-022
Disposal Site South of the Classification Area
A disposal site in a fenced area south of the classification area was identified from 1948 aerial photographs. No sampling has been conducted at this AOC. Current Phase: RFA This AOC poses no past or current public health hazard. There is no public access to the site and groundwater at SFAAP is not a source of drinking water. Even though trespassing has been known to occur, no one is likely to be exposed to contaminants at sufficient doses to cause adverse health effects.

No future public health hazard is anticipated as long as the site is cleaned to appropriate standards.

Sources: Army 2000, Burns 2000, Burns & McDonnell 1997a, EPA 1999, EPA 2000b, SFAAP 1999

Abbreviations:

AOC - Area of Concern
CMI - Corrective Measures Investigation
CMS - Corrective Measures Study
CV - comparison value
EPA - U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY - fiscal year
GN - guanidine nitrate
IRA - Interim Remedial Action
LTM - long-term monitoring
KDHE - Kansas Department of Health and Environment
NC - nitrocellulose
NG - nitroglycerine
NQ - nitroguanidine
PCB - polychlorinated biphenyl
ppm - parts per million
RCRA - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act
RFA - RCRA Facility Assessment
RFI - RCRA Feasibility Investigation
SFAAP - Sunflower Army Ammunition Plant
SWMU - Solid Waste Management Unit
SVOC - semi-volatile organic compound
VOC - volatile organic compound



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