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PUBLIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT

FORT DEVENS
AYER, MIDDLESEX COUNTY, MASSACHUSETTS


TABLES

Table 1.

Evaluation of Potential Public Health Hazards Associated with Major Study Areas and Areas of Contamination at Fort Devens
Site Site Description/ Waste Disposal History Investigation Results/ Environmental Monitoring Results Current Status Evaluation of Public Health Hazard
MAIN POST
Areas of Contamination (AOCs) 4, 5, and 18
Shepley's Hill Landfill
AOC 4: Incinerator for destruction of household debris (quantity unknown).
AOC 5: Municipal sanitary landfill for disposal of household refuse, construction debris, and military refuse (6,500 tons/year).
AOC 18: Asbestos cell for disposal of asbestos and asbestos- containing debris (about 6.6 tons).
Groundwater: Metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were detected at levels above comparison values (CVs). Groundwater discharges into Plow Shop Pond may have contaminated sediments in the pond with arsenic, iron, and barium. After closure in 1992, the Shepley's Hill Landfill was covered with a protective cap (layer of plastic sheeting covered with a topsoil layer) to prevent contamination from leaching into the groundwater. A ROD for the landfill was signed in 1995. Currently, Shepley's Hill Landfill is undergoing long-term groundwater monitoring, landfill cap inspection, and maintenance activities by the Army. The Army, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MADEP) are conducting a detailed review to assess the effectiveness of this cleanup option. No public health hazards exist because no wells draw groundwater from beneath the landfill. No public health hazards are related to indirect exposure via contact with contaminants that may have entered Plow Shop Pond sediment/surface water.
AOC 11
Landfill No. 7 Near Lowell Street
Active from 1975 to 1980, this 2-acre landfill is located near the Nashua River. The landfill received wood frame hospital demolition debris when active. After closure, it was covered and graded. Tree limbs and other vegetation were placed at the site between 1980 and 1982. Groundwater and Surface Water: Metals were detected at levels above CVs.

Surface Soil: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and pesticides were infrequently detected at levels above CVs.

Sediment: PAHs were infrequently detected at levels above CVs.

A ROD signed in July 1999 states that the Army will fully excavate and consolidate AOC 11 contaminated media with materials from SA and 13 and AOC 9 and 40 in a on-site (the Golf Course Driving Range) or at an off-site location to be determined. If the material is disposed off on site, the cell will be lined and capped, and long-term groundwater monitoring will be performed. No public health hazard exists because public exposure is limited.
SA 13
Lake George Street Landfill
The 10,000 cubic yard landfill located on the Main Post is used for the disposal of construction debris, tree stumps, and possibly oil. The landfill was used between 1965 and 1990. Groundwater and Surface Water: Metals and/or explosives were detected; concentrations of some compounds exceeded CVs.

Surface Soil and Sediment: Metals and/or PAHs were detected; some PAH levels exceeded CVs.

As outlined in a July 1999 ROD, surface material from this landfill will be excavated and consolidated with materials from AOCs 9, 11, and 40 in an on-site location (possibly at the Golf Course Driving Range) or at an off-site location. The site is presently accessed only by occasional visitors, so public exposure is limited and not likely to pose a public health hazard. Future land use of the site will not be residential, but it may be used for recreational or commercial/industrial purposes.
SA 17
Mirror Lake
WWII era grenades were placed in the lake. So far 200 grenades have been discovered and removed. Sediment: Metals were detected, but at levels below CVs .

Fish: Mercury was detected in fish tissue.

In the fall of 1995, the Army removed drums and debris from the site. A final No Further Action Decision Document and Close-Out Report was signed in March 1997. No public health hazards are associated with the low levels of metals in sediment. Consumption of fish could pose a hazard to certain sensitive populations (e.g., children) if large quantities of fish were consumed for a long time, but a fish consumption advisory has been posted.
AOC 32
Defense Reutilization and Market Office (DRMO) Yard
AOC 32 consists of two paved, fenced enclosures. Used from 1964 to the present for temporary storage of scrap metal, vehicles, used and drained lead-acid batteries (40,000 pounds per month), tires, used photographic solution, and other wastes. Surface Soil: Metals and pesticides were detected at levels above CVs.

Groundwater: Metals and VOCs were detected; concentrations of some VOCs exceeded CVs.

A ROD calling for soil removal was signed in February 1998. The Army removed the contaminated soil and debris in July 1998 and monitored natural attenuation to address contaminated groundwater in the 1998/1999. A draft study done in July 1999 demonstrated that the remedial actions are operating effectively. The area is inaccessible to the general public, and therefore is not likely to pose a public health hazard. Exposure to site contaminants is limited to occasional site visits by military personnel. Any future use of the groundwater as a drinking water source is unlikely because there is an existing public water system.
AOC 40
Cold Spring Brook Landfill
Debris and fourteen 55-gallon drums that formerly stored antifreeze were uncovered in a 10- to 20-acre abandoned landfill near Cold Spring Brook in 1987. AOC 40 landfill is located within 600 feet of the Patton Well (a drinking water supply well). Groundwater and Surface water: Metals were detected at levels above CVs. In the past and currently, all detected groundwater contaminant concentrations have been below state and federal drinking water standards. Downgradient wells (those that may have been affected by the landfill site) have not contained arsenic at levels greater than the drinking water standard.

Surface Soil: PAH levels exceeded CVs.

Sediment: Metals and PAHs were detected at levels above CVs.

A ROD signed in July 1999 states that the Army will fully excavate and consolidate AOC 40 contaminated media with materials from SA and 13 and AOC 9 and 11 in a on-site (the Golf Course Driving Range) or at an off-site location to be determined. If the material is disposed off on site, the cell will be lined and capped, and long-term groundwater monitoring will be performed. Current and past exposures to sediment, soil, and groundwater contaminants have been too low to pose a public health hazard. There may be future health concerns associated with the site, depending on land and resource use. Future exposure to soil and sediment will likely remain limited because the area around AOC 40 has been designated for industrial /commercial use. Exposure to groundwater contaminants in the future may increase if the proposed expansion plan of the Patton well pumping capabilities is implemented.
AOC 43A
POL Storage Area
Located adjacent to Shepley's Landfill, the area was used for gasoline, diesel fuel, and heating oil storage and distribution. Five underground storage tanks (USTs) (four 12,600-gallon and one 10,000-gallon) that stored fuel oil No. 2 were removed along with soil containing fuels and petroleum products. Surface Soil: Metals and pesticides were detected at levels above CVs.

Groundwater: Metals and VOCs were detected; concentrations of some VOCs exceeded Cvs.

A ROD calling groundwater monitoring to evaluate natural attenuation was signed in 1998. The Army monitored natural attenuation to address contaminated groundwater in the 1998/1999. A draft study done in July 1999 demonstrated that the remedial actions are operating effectively. No public health hazards are associated with the low levels of contaminants detected in on-site soil. Under current use scenarios, groundwater at this AOC is not a public health concern.
AOC 43G
Historic Gas Station Site/ Gas Station
AOC 43G was used for gasoline and waste oil storage and distribution. A 5,000-gallon gasoline UST was removed. Groundwater: Metals and VOCs were detected; concentrations of some metals exceeded CVs.

Subsurface Soil: PAHs and/or metals were detected at levels above CVs.

In 1996, the Army signed a record of decision (ROD) for AOC 43G that called for the use of bioremediation technologies at this site. Today, the Army is measuring and assessing its success in reducing contaminant concentrations. They are also conducting long-term groundwater monitoring. No public health hazard exists because subsurface soils are inaccessible and contaminants were not detected at levels of health concern. No one uses site groundwater for drinking purposes.
AOC 43J
Historic Gas Station Site
AOC 43J was used for gasoline and waste oil storage and distribution. A 5,000-gallon gasoline UST was removed. Groundwater: Metal and VOC concentrations exceeded CVs.

Subsurface Soil: PAHs and/or metals were detected at levels above CVs.

In 1996, the Army signed a ROD for AOC 43J that called for the use of bioremediation technologies at this site. Today, the Army is measuring and assessing its success in reducing contaminant concentrations. They are also conducting long-term groundwater monitoring. No public health hazard exists because subsurface soils are inaccessible and contaminants were not detected at levels of health concern. No one uses site groundwater for drinking purposes.
AOC 44
Cannibalization Yard
Vehicles are stored on this 150-foot by 75-foot, unpaved area before being dismantled for reusable parts. Topsoil is periodically removed and disposed offsite. AOC 44 is being studied with AOC 52. Surface Soil: PAHs were detected at levels above CVs. The ROD was issued in March 1995. The Remedial Design and Removal Action (RD/RA) Work Plan was issued in June 1995. The site was combined with AOC 52 and removal actions were completed in December 1995. The Remedial Action Completion Report was issued in June 1996. Since March 1998, annual groundwater monitoring has been conducted. No public health hazard exists because soils are inaccessible and contaminated soil has been removed.
SA 49
Bldg 3602
SA 49 was used as a fuel handling and storage area. Groundwater: Metals were detected at levels above CVs. VOCs were either not detected or detect at levels below CVs.

Surface Soil: PAHs and metals were detected at levels below CVs.

A draft No Further Action was issued in April 1996. No public health hazard exists because subsurface soils are inaccessible and contaminants were not detected at levels of health concern. No one uses groundwater at this study area for drinking purposes.
AOC 52
Maintenance Yard
AOC 52 is an active storage area for vehicles awaiting repair. Small patches of soil (2 - 3 feet) contain visible traces of motor oil or hydraulic fluid. Soil: Petroleum products and organic chemicals were detected at levels above CVs. The ROD was issued in March 1995. The RD/RA Work Plan was issued in June 1995. Removal actions were completed in December 1995. The Remedial Action Completion Report was issued in June 1996. Since march 1998, annual groundwater monitoring has been conducted. Because it is inaccessible to the general public, this area is not likely to pose a public health hazard. Exposure to site contaminants, if any, is limited to occasional site visits
SA 56
Bldg 2417
SA 56 was used for fuel storage. Soil: Petroleum products and organic chemicals were detected at levels above CVs. The closure report is under review. A Draft No Further Action Decision was issued in April 1996. Because it is inaccessible to the general public, this area is not likely to pose a public health hazard. Exposure to site contaminants, if any, is limited to occasional site visits by military personnel.
AOC 57
Bldg 3713
Fuel Oil Spill Site
This building housed several industrial activities, including an Army vehicle repair shop. In 1978, No. 4 fuel oil was spilled. Oil products have been found on the banks of Cold Spring Brook. Soil: Petroleum products and organic chemicals were detected were detected at levels above CVs. An Interim Removal Action consisting of removal of approximately 1,300 cubic yards of oil-contaminated soil was completed in October 1994. A RI was completed in October 1998. No one uses groundwater at this AOC for drinking purposes. Because this AOC is inaccessible to the general public, this area is not likely to pose a public health hazard. Exposure to site contaminants, if any, is limited to occasional site visits.
AOC 63AX
Bldg 2517
Located north and near the western end of Patton Road on the southern portion of the Main Post, AOC 63AX consists of a large paved and fenced area, Building 2517 (currently used as a warehouse by the U.S. Bureau of Prisons), and Building 2514, which is abandoned. It is also the former location of a 1,000-gallon and a 5,000-gallon UST. Subsurface Soil: Metals and PAHs were detected; concentrations of some PAHs exceeded CVs.

Groundwater: Metals and VOCs were detected; concentrations of some metals exceeded CVs.

Prior to remedial activities, the Army had removed the underground storage tank at this site. In the fall of 1996, the Army completed the draft RI report. A final No Further Action ROD was signed in 1997. The site poses no public health hazard. The site is presently accessed only by military personnel, so public exposure to on-site soil contamination is limited and not likely to pose a public health hazard. The area is served by the Fort Devens public water supply, therefore, exposure to contaminated groundwater is unlikely.
AOC 69W
Bldg 215 Elementary School
In 1972 and 1978 fuel oil No. 2 was accidentally released to the soil and groundwater in the area of the school. The suspected source was a broken pipe. Soil: Total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHC) were detected.

Groundwater: TPHC, metals, semivolatile organic compounds, and VOCs were detected at levels above CVs.

Air: No compounds related to the release were detected at levels above CVS.

The school has been closed since 1993. The fuel-oil contaminated soil has been removed and the heating system replaced. Groundwater contamination is being tracked by long-term monitoring. Air sampling has also been conducted at the school. A ROD calling for long-term groundwater monitoring and institutional controls that restrict groundwater access was signed in June 1999. The site poses no current or future public health hazards. ATSDR is not fully able to evaluate past exposure because of the lack of data describing indoor air quality in the past.
SA 71
Railroad Roundhouse
The railroad roundhouse, located at the southern edge of Plow Shop Pond, was operated by the Boston & Maine Railroad between 1900 and 1935. Fort Devens currently owns the property where only portions of the roundhouse foundation remain. Metals and petroleum products were detected at levels above CVs. A RI/FS was SA 71 completed. The Army is removing contaminated soil from this area. Because it is inaccessible to the general public, this area is not likely to pose a public health hazard. Exposure to site contaminants, if any, is limited to occasional site visits.
AOC 72
Plow Shop Pond and Grove Pond
Plow Shop Pond is a shallow, 30-acre pond located outside the installation boundary at the northeast corner of the Main Post. The primary source of water to Plow Shop Pond is flow from Grove Pond, located just upstream. Sediment: Metals and PAHs were detected at concentrations above CVs.

Surface Water: Metal concentrations infrequently exceeded CVs.

Fish: Mercury at concentrations above guidance levels was detected.

Investigations suggest Shepley's Landfill was a source of arsenic, barium, iron, and manganese in Plow Shop Pond sediment, but inflow from Grove Pond may also have contributed to iron and manganese concentrations. EPA is conducting an ecological risk evaluation and investigating the effectiveness of natural attenuation for reducing the level of contaminants in pond sediment. Chronic exposure to arsenic and chromium in Grove Pond sediment (which might not be related to Fort Devens) may pose an unacceptable public health hazard. The likelihood of this occurring, however, is minimal. No public health hazard is expected from contact with surface water. Consumption of fish could pose a hazard to certain sensitive populations (e.g., children) if large quantities of fish were consumed for a long time, but a fish consumption advisory has been posted.
SA 73
Lower Cold Spring Brook
Cold Spring Brook flows along the eastern boundary of the site, near the Cold Spring Landfill. Sediment: Metals were detected. A site investigation report was issued in December 1995. Supplemental sampling has been completed and the results were issued in a report dated July 1998. Exposures that might occur during recreation are not likely to result in adverse health effects.
NORTH POST
AOC 9
North Post Landfill
Operated from 1950s to 1978, the landfill is located just west of the Fort Devens wastewater treatment plant. This landfill contains approximately 112,000 cubic yards of construction debris and tree stumps and limbs. Groundwater: Metals and other inorganic compounds were detected at concentrations above CVs.

Surface Soil and Sediment: No chemicals were detected at concentrations above both background levels and CVs.

A ROD signed in July 1999 states that the Army will fully excavate and consolidate AOC 9 contaminated media with materials from SA and 13 and AOC 11 and 40 in a on-site (the Golf Course Driving Range) or at an off-site location to be determined. If the material is disposed off on site, the cell will be lined and capped, and long-term groundwater monitoring will be performed. No public health hazard exists because no chemicals were detected in surface soil. No one uses site groundwater for drinking purposes. Moreover, public exposure to the site is limited because AOC 9 is a landfill, therefore, it is highly unlikely that structures (including residences) would be built at the site.
SA 30
Drum Storage Area
Area used for accumulation of hazardous waste (550-825 gallons). Surface Soil: No contamination was found. A No Further Action Site document was signed in September 1995. No public health hazard exists because surface soil contaminants were not detected.
AOC 50
WW II Fuel Points
Located along the northeastern boundary of the Moore Army Air Field, this site was used for aircraft fueling from 1941 to 1945. The area had five underground fuel storage tanks and associated piping. Tanks and piping have been removed. The area was also used for cleaning parachutes. Soil and Groundwater: Petroleum products and tetrachloroethylene were detected at levels above CVs. Phase I Removal of three USTs was completed in January 1993. Phase II Removal (soil vapor extraction for tetrachloroethylene [PCE]) was installed in January 1994, and remains on-going. Long-term monitoring of groundwater will continue. A draft RI was issued in 1997 and the Army is further investigating options to reduce the PCE contamination in groundwater. No public health hazard exists because no one uses the groundwater beneath the site for drinking purposes. The Army, EPA, and MADEP are tracking the groundwater contamination to reduce the potential for future health hazards.
SOUTH POST
Study Area (SA) 6
Landfill No. 2
Located on the South Post, this landfill was used between 1850 and 1920 for disposal of household refuse and glass. No contamination found. No further remedial action is proposed for SA 6. No public health hazard exists because contaminants were not detected.
SA 12
Range Control Landfill
Located atop a steep slope near the Nashua River, the landfill contains approximately 8,700 cubic yards of construction and range operation debris. Groundwater: Metals were detected at levels above CVs.

Surface Soil and Sediment: PCBs and/or metals were detected; some levels exceeded CVs.

A ROD signed in July 1999 calls for the removal of surface debris and surface soil from hot spots that pose a potential ecological risk. The MADEP will be responsible for future monitoring at AOC 12. Because SA 12 is inaccessible to the general public, it is not likely to pose a public health hazard. Exposure to site contaminants is limited to occasional site visits by military personnel. Future public exposure will continue to be restricted because the site will remain under military control. No one uses site groundwater for drinking purposes.
AOCs 25, 26, 27, and 41
South Post Groundwater Operable Unit
AOC 25 - EOD Ranges. Since 1979, about 1,200 pounds per year of explosives and ammunition have been soaked with diesel fuel and burned in open pits. Larger items are detonated with C-4 or TNT. Site is about 5 acres.

AOC 26 - ZULU I & II. This 20-acre site has two range areas, Zulu I and II. Zulu I is used for hand grenade and demolition training. Explosives and items containing explosives residue are burned at Zulu II.

AOC 27 - Hotel Range. The estimated 7-acre training range is used for firing rifle grenades and 20-mm automatic cannons with red phosphorous tracers. The area was used before 1979 for disposal of old/defective grenades and rockets.

AOC 41 - Unauthorized Dumping Area. One-acre site used until the 1950s for disposal of nonexplosive military and household debris.

Groundwater and Surface Soil: Explosives and metals were infrequently detected at levels above CVs.

Groundwater: Metals and PAHs were detected; concentrations of some metals exceeded CVs.

Surface Soil and Sediment:Metals, explosives, and PAHs were detected; concentrations of PAHs exceeded CVs.

Groundwater: Metals and explosives were detected at levels below CVs.

Sediment (Cranberry Pond): Metals, pesticides, and PAHs were generally detected at levels below CVs. Explosives were also detected.

Surface water and Sediments: Metals were detected at levels above CVs.

AOCs 25, 26, 27, and 41 have been designated a groundwater operable unit. Long-term on-site groundwater monitoring is conducted.

The Army will remove surface debris and surface soil from hot spots in areas that pose a risk to ecological receptors at AOC 41.

The Army will retain South Post for training. Because these AOCs are inaccessible to the general public, it is not likely to pose a public health hazard. Exposure to site contaminants is limited to occasional site visits by military personnel. Future public exposure will continue to be restricted because the site will remain under military control. No one uses site groundwater or surface water for drinking purposes.
SA 39
Old Sylvania Building
SA 39 is a PCB leak from a transformer. Soil: PCBs were detected at levels above CVs. Removal actions occurred in September 1995. A Draft No Further Action Decision was issued in May 1996. The area is inaccessible to the general public, and therefore is not likely to pose a public health hazard. Exposure to site contaminants is limited to occasional site visits by military personnel.

Sources: ABB Environmental Services, Inc., 1995; BRAC, 1996a, 1996b, 1997, and 1999; Fort Devens, 1995b; Fort Devens, 1996; Fort Devens, 1997; Horne Engineering Services, Inc., 1997.

Table 2.

Local Public Water Supplies
Area Well (s) Years of Operation Location Use < MCL?
Fort Devens Shebokin 1941-present Building 3628 on the Main Post Fort Devens water supply Yes
Patton 1953-present Building 3630 on the Main Post Fort Devens water supply Yes
MacPherson 1966-present East of the MacPherson Road and the Nashua River on the North Post Fort Devens water supply Yes
Grove Pond Wellfield unavailable The wellfield consisting of eight wells, is located along the south shore of Grove Pond Fort Devens water supply Yes
Well D-1 mid-1980s - present for military training Along Dixie Road South Post Short-term troop training Yes
Ayer Grove Pond 1943-1993; 1998-present South shore of Grove Pond Ayer public water supply 1
Spectacle Pond 1978-present Near Littleton town line Ayer public water supply 1
Harvard Well 1 1930s to 1990 Ayer Road Closed in 1990; abandoned in 1997. Yes
Well 2 1960s-present Pond Road, 1,600 feet from Fort Devens Services 65 homes. Yes
Well 3 unavailable Bolton Road. Not near Fort Devens Emergency use only. Yes
Well 4 under construction Pond Road, 100 feet from Well 2. Will supplement well 2 supply. 2
Lancaster Wells various Bolton Station Road Serves 1,500-1,600 residents Yes
Shirley Patterson 1977-present Patterson Road, near Morse Brook Supplies 80% of annual average Yes
Catacunemaug 1953-present Catacunemaug Road Supplies 20% of annual average Yes

Source: ADPW, 1998a; Harvard Water Department, 1998; Lancaster Water Department, 1998; Shirley Water District, 1998; Devens Commerce Center, 1998.
1 Manganese has been detected at levels above the MCL in the past. The well water is currently treated for manganese. 2The information is not available.

Table 3.

Exposure Pathways
Pathway Name Source of Contamination Environmental Medium Point of Exposure Route of Exposure Potentially Exposed Population Comments
Public Drinking Water--Ayer Grove Pond Wells Arsenic, iron, and manganese possibly from naturally occurring and site-related sources Groundwater Ayer public water Ingestion, dermal contact, and inhalation Ayer public water users Past :
• Arsenic, iron, and manganese were detected in the Grove Pond wells before they were closed in 1993. ATSDR has determined that the concentrations of these compounds are unlikely to cause harmful effects, even for residents who used the water for extended periods. No exposure occurred after 1993.

Current and Future :
• No exposure to harmful levels of contaminants is occurring or is expected to occur. During the summer of 1998, the Ayer Department of Public Works returned the Grove Pond wells to regular service. Before the water is delivered to residential taps, the water is treated to ensure that it is safe to drink. Since start-up, water has met EPA safe drinking water standards.

Surface Water/Sediment Contaminants related to upgradient sources surrounding the lake, including Fort Devens and a former tannery Surface Water
Sediment
Grove Pond and Plow Shop Pond Dermal contact while swimming, wading, boating, or fishing Recreational users of the Grove Pond and Plow Shop Pond Past:
• Elevated levels of contaminants were detected in sediment, but use of the pond would not have resulted in adverse health effects.

Current and Future:
• As a precautionary measure, a no swimming advisory has been posted at Grove Pond and Plow Shop Pond. Any brief and infrequent contact that might occur through wading is unlikely to result in adverse health effects.

Food Chain Contaminants related to sources surrounding the ponds or lake, including former tannery, Fort Devens, and naturally occurring sources Fish Grove Pond, Plow Shop Pond, and Mirror Lake Ingestion of fish Anglers Past:
• Largemouth bass in Grove Pond, Plow Shop Pond, and Mirror Lake contain elevated levels of mercury. ATSDR believes that people who ate moderate amounts of fish in a varied diet should not suffer adverse health effects.

Current and Future:
• As a precautionary measure, a fish consumption advisory has been posted at Grove Pond, Plow Shop Pond, and Mirror Lake. By following the precaution in the advisory people can best limit their exposure to mercury.

Indoor Air Fuel oil release Indoor air Devens Elementary School Inhalation Teachers
Students
Past:
• No data are available on the indoor air quality at the school in the past, so it is unknown to what extent, if any, the indoor air was adversely impacted by the oil spill. It is unlikely, however, that people were exposed to air contaminants at levels of health concern.

Current and Future:
• No contaminants have been detected at levels of public health concern.


Table 4.

Summary of Contaminants in On-Site Groundwater
Contaminant Maximum Concentration (ppb) and Location Comparison Value (ppb) 1
Noncarcinogenic Carcinogenic (CREG)
Volatile Organic Compounds
Benzene 2,000 AOC 43G 5 MCL 1
Chloroethane 5.5 Shepley's Hill Landfill --- ---
Ethylbenzene 2,000 AOC 43G 700 MCL ---
Tetrachloroethylene 40,000 AOC 50 5 MCL 0.7
Toluene 300 AOC 43G 700 I-EMEG Adult ---
Xylenes 20,000 AOC 43G 7,000 I-EMEG Adult ---
1,1-Dichloroethane 4.4 Shepley's Hill Landfill --- ---
1,2-Dichloroethane 9.9 Shepley's Hill Landfill 5 MCL 0.4
Dichlorobenzenes (total) 11 Shepley's Hill Landfill --- ---
Metals
Aluminum 75,500 Shepley's Hill Landfill 3,700 Region III RBC ---
Antimony 4 (filtered) AOC 43G 3 LTHA ---
Arsenic 390 Shepley's Hill Landfill 10 C- EMEG Adult 0.02
Chromium 115 Shepley's Hill Landfill 100 MCL ---
Iron 97,400 Shepley's Hill Landfill --- ---
Lead 103 AOC 44 --- ---
Manganese 14,300 AOC 43G 200 RMEG Adult ---
Nickel 177 Shepley's Hill Landfill 100 MCL ---

Source: Horne Engineering Services, Inc., 1996.
1 The adult and child comparison values are based on ATSDR's most recent comparison values (expiration date of March 31, 1999).
Key: ppb = parts per billion; CREG = ATSDR's cancer risk evaluation guide; EMEG = ATSDR's environmental media evaluation guide; LTHA = EPA's Lifetime Health Advisory; MCL = EPA's maximum contaminant level; --- = not available.

Table 5.

Summary of Contaminants in Grove Pond and Plow Shop Pond Surface Water
Contaminant Surface Water Concentrations (ppb) Comparison Values (ppb) 1
Non-Carcinogenic Carcinogenic
Grove Pond Plow Shop Pond Adult Child
Range Frequency Range Frequency
Arsenic 3.94 1/6 2.99 - 6.84 13/13 10 EMEG 3 EMEG 0.02
Cadmium nd 0/6 nd 0/6 7 EMEG 2 EMEG ---
Chromium 6.76 - 39.8 2/6 nd 0/13 100 MCL 100 MCL ---
Lead 2.39 - 3.04 2/6 nd 0/13 15
EPA's Action Level
--- ---
Manganese 39.9 - 100 6/6 7.81 - 139 13/13 200 RMEG 50 RMEG ---
Mercury nd 0/6 nd 0/6 --- --- ---

Source: ABB, 1995.

1 The adult and child comparison values are based on ATSDR's most recent comparison values (expiration date March 31, 1999).

Key: EMEG = ATSDR's environmental media evaluation guide; MCL = EPA's maximum contaminant level; RMEG = ATSDR's reference dose media evaluation guide;--- = not available; nd= analyte not detected.

Table 6.

Summary of Contaminants in Grove Pond and Plow Shop Pond Sediment
Contaminant Concentration Range (ppm) Comparison Values (ppm) 4
Noncarcinogenic Carcinogenic
Grove Pond 1 Grove Pond
(Pirone Park) 2
Plow Shop Pond 3 Adult Child
Range Frequency Range Frequency Maximum Frequency
Arsenic 4.16 - 1,300 41/41 9.23 - 110 7/7 3,200 63/63 200 EMEG 20 EMEG 0.5
Cadmium 3.07 - 110 22/41 18.7 - 23.3 3/7 60.2 21/63 100 EMEG 10 EMEG ---
Chromium 17.1 - 49,800 40/41 35.3 - 2,680 7/7 10,000 60/63 --- --- ---
Lead 3.21 - 1,760 12/41 11.4 - 232 7/7 1,000 62/63 400 EPA Screening Value 400 EPA Screening Value ---
Manganese 14.4 - 1,730 41/41 145 - 792 7/7 54,800 59/63 100,000 RMEG 7,000 RMEG ---
Mercury 0.128 - 220 34/41 0.772 - 2.18 6/7 250 58/63 --- --- ---
PAHs5 5 20/41 0.8 1/7 4.3 3/13 --- --- 0.1

Source: ABB, 1995.

1 Monitoring data from 1992 - 1995.
2 Data subset includes samples (GRD-16x to GRD-22x) collected along the shoreline of Grove Pond at Pirone Park in 1995.
3 Data from the 1991 RI, the 1992-1993 SRI, and the 1994 PSP sediment evaluation. Only the maximum concentrations were presented for the RI and PSP data.
4 The adult and child comparison values are based on ATSDR's most recent comparison values (expiration date of March 31, 1999).
5 The values represent the highest recorded concentration for an individual PAH. Pyrene was detected at the highest levels. A comparison value for benzo(a)pyrene of 0.1 ppm was used.

Key: PAHs = polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; EMEG = ATSDR's environmental media evaluation guide; RMEG = ATSDR's reference dose media evaluation guide; --- = not available; nd =analyte not detected.

Table 7.

Summary of Contaminants in Grove Pond Fish
Contaminant Contaminant Concentrations (mg/kg) Comparison Value
(mg/kg)
Largemouth Bass
(Reconstructed Wholebody Samples) 1
Brown Bullhead
(Reconstructed Wholebody Samples) 1
Bluegill
(Wholebody Samples)
Range Frequency Range Frequency Range Frequency
Cadmium 0.03 - 0.88 3/10 0.01 - 0.19 2/8 0.05 - 0.24 10/10 ---
Lead 0.14 - 4.32 4/10 0.18 - 1.12 3/8 0.16 - 1.38 10/10 ---
Mercury 0.10 - 1.13 10/10 0.01 - 0.14 6/8 0.08 - 0.24 10/10 1 FDA action level
Selenium 0.22 - 0.51 10/10 0.13 - 0.39 3/8 0.27 - 0.38 10/10 ---
Zinc 11.0 - 16.4 10/10 10.0 - 20.5 8/8 16.7 - 26.3 10/10 ---
PCBs 0.10 - 0.43 10/10 0.08 - 0.12 2/8 0.025 - 0.21 10/10 2 FDA tolerance level
DDD 0.02 - 0.11 10/10 0.02 - 0.05 7/8 0.01 - 0.07 10/10 5 FDA action level
DDE 0.05 - 0.25 10/10 0.01 - 0.10 8/8 0.02 - 0.13 10/10 5 FDA action level

Source: U.S. Fish and Wildlife, 1993.

1 Contaminant concentrations in reconstructed wholebody samples are presented because they were generally greater than concentrations detected in fillet samples.

Key: mg/kg = milligram per kilogram; DDD = 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane; DDT = 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene; FDA = Food and Drug Administration; --- = noFDA action level or tolerance level available.

Table 8.

Summary of Contaminants in Plow Shop Pond Fish
Contaminant Contaminant Concentrations (mg/kg) Comparison Value
(mg/kg)
Largemouth Bass and Brown Bullhead
(Fillet Samples)
Bluegill
(Wholebody Samples)
Range Frequency Range Frequency
Arsenic 0.09 - 0.15 2/10 1.3 1/5 ---
Lead not analyzed   0.16 1/5 ---
Manganese 0.3 1/10 39.1 - 94.7 5/5 ---
Mercury 0.12 - 4 8/10 0.19 - 0.54 5/5 1 FDA action level
Selenium 0.11 - 0.2 10/10 0.42 - 0.67 5/5 ---
Zinc 3.4 - 6.1 10/10 22.2 - 29.6 5/5 ---
DDE 0.015 - 0.031 2/10 0.0121 - 0.0129 2/5 5 FDA action level

Source: Fort Devens, 1995b.

Key: ppb = parts per billion; mg/kg = milligram per kilogram; DDE = 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene; FDA = Food and Drug Administration; --- = no FDA action level or tolerance level available.


Table 9.

Summary of Contaminants in Mirror Lake Fish
Contaminant Contaminant Concentrations (mg/kg) Comparison Value
(mg/kg)
Largemouth Bass and Brown Bullhead
(Fillet Samples)
Range Frequency
Arsenic nd 0/18 ---
Lead nd 0/18 ---
Mercury 0.05 - 0.69 15/15 1 FDA action level
Selenium 0.065 - 0.264 18/18 ---
Zinc 2.8 - 6.0 18/18 ---
PCBs nd 0/13 2 FDA action level
Pesticides nd 0/13 ---

Source: Fort Devens, 1995b.

Key: ppb = parts per billion; mg/kg = milligram per kilogram; DDE = 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene; FDA = Food and Drug Administration; nd = not detected; --- = no FDA action level or tolerance level available.


FIGURES

Site Map
Figure 1. Site Map

Demographics Within a 1-Mile Buffer of Fort Devens
Figure 2. Demographics Within a 1-Mile Buffer of Fort Devens

ATSDR's Exposure Evaluation Process
Figure 3. ATSDR's Exposure Evaluation Process

Grove Pond Wells
Figure 4. Grove Pond Wells

Grove Pond and Plow Shop Pond
Figure 5. Grove Pond and Plow Shop Pond



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