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PUBLIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT

LONE STAR ARMY AMMUNITION PLANT
TEXARKANA, BOWIE COUNTY, TEXAS


FIGURES

Site Location and Demographic Statistics within One Mile of Site
Figure 1. Site Location and Demographic Statistics Within One Mile of Site

Lone Star Army Ammunition Plant General Site Location
Figure 2. Lone Star Army Ammunition Plant General Site Location

Lone Star Areas of Known or Potential Contamination
Figure 3. Lone Star Areas of Known or Potential Contamination


APPENDICES

Appendix A.

Acronyms and Abbreviations
AMCCOM U.S. Army Armament, Munitions and Chemical Command
ATSDR Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry
CERCLA Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1990
CRD Cancer Registry Division, Texas Department of Health
CREG Carcinogenic Risk Evaluation Guide
CLTHA Child Lifetime Health Advisory
DNT Dinitrotoluene
DOD Department of Defense
EMEG Environmental Media Evaluation Guide
EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
HAC Health Assessment Comparison Value
LONE STAR Lone Star Army Ammunition Plant
LTHA Lifetime Health Advisory
MCL Maximum Contaminant Level
MCLG Maximum Contaminant Level Goal
g/L Micrograms per Liter
mg/kg Milligrams per Kilogram
MRL Minimal Risk Level
NOAEL No Observable Adverse Effects Level
NPL National Priorities List
ODA Old Demolition Area
PHA Public Health Assessment
PMCLG Proposed Maximum Contaminant Level Goal
PPE Personal Protective Equipment
RCRA Resource Conservation Recovery Act
RfD Reference Dose
RMEG Reference Dose-based Media Evaluation Guide
RRAD Red River Army Depot
SARA 1986 Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act
Semi-VOCs Semivolatile Organic Compounds
TDH Texas Department of Health
TNRCC Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission
TNT Trinitrotoluene
VOCs Volatile Organic Compounds
WHO World Health Organization

Appendix B.

Definitions
Aquifer A layer of permeable rock containing water
Dermal Of or relating to the skin
Groundwater Water beneath the ground surface
Ingest To take in; as in to eat
Inhalation To breathe in
Migrate To move from one place to another
Pyrotechnic Fireworks, powders, and ammunition for display, military signaling or illumination.

Appendix C

Evaluation of Potential Public Health Hazards Associated with the Lone Star Sites
Lone Star Army Ammunition Plant
Appendix C. Evaluation of Potential Public Health Hazards Associated with the Lone Star Sites

Lone Star Site Site Description/ Waste Disposal History Investigation Results/ Environmental Monitoring Results Corrective Activities and Current Status ATSDR's Evaluation of Public Health Hazards
Site 1
Inactive Western Sanitary Landfill
A 23-acre landfill used from the mid-1940s-1973 to dispose of sanitary wastes generated by Red River Army Depot and Lone Star. The landfill may contain paint filters, paint cans, paint thinners, contaminated rags, oil absorbent, sulfuric acid containers, floor sweepings, sand blast, sodium and potassium nitrate. Sampled in 1988 and 1990, and 1998 for metals, VOCs, SVOCs, and pesticides to determine the nature and extent of contamination.

Groundwater: Metals exceeding health-based screening values included arsenic, beryllium, mercury, manganese, nickel, and lead. VOCs exceeding health-based screening values included 1,1-dichloroethene, benzene, chloromethane, methylene chloride, vinyl chloride, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichloroethene, and bis-2(ethylhexyl)phthalate. Explosives included RDX

Surface Water: Metals exceeding health-based screening values included arsenic, cadmium, chromium, manganese, lead, and zinc. The VOCs 1,2-dichloroethane and 1,1,2 trichloroethane exceeded health-based screening values. The pesticide p,p'-DDE exceeded health-based screening values. The explosive 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene exceeded health-based screening values.

Sediment: Metals exceeding health-based screening values included arsenic. No VOCs or pesticides exceeded health-based screening values.

Soil: Metals exceeding health-based screening values included arsenic and beryllium. VOCs and pesticides did not exceed health-based screening values.

Corrective Activities and Current Status: Ongoing investigation to determine nature and extent of contamination. Access has always been highly restricted and it will continue to be so in the future. Past, current, and future exposures to the general public are unlikely. Past, current, and future exposures to workers do not pose a public health hazard because visits are infrequent and/or conducted with PPE. No drinking water wells are located in this area and it is unlikely that water production wells will be installed in the future. Past and current exposures to groundwater, therefore, have not occurred.
Site 2
Paint Filter Site
The Paint Filter Site is 2,000 feet southwest of the Inactive Western Sanitary Landfill (Site 1) and was used by RRAD in 1980 for disposal of used paint filters from spray paint operations. Groundwater: Selenium was the only metal above the MCL. VOCs, SVOCs, Pesticides, PCBs, and Explosives were below detection. Corrective Activities and Current Status: Site closed under Risk Reduction Standard 1. The closure report is being prepared. When completed, the closure reported will be submitted to TNRCC for review and approval. Access has always been highly restricted and it will continue to be so in the future. Past, current, and future exposures to the general public are unlikely. Past, current, and future exposures to workers do not pose a public health hazard because visits are infrequent and/or conducted with PPE.
Site 3
Active Western Sanitary Landfill
The Active Western Sanitary Landfill is south of the Inactive Western Sanitary Landfill (Site 1), near the western boundary of Lone Star. It has been used as a sanitary landfill since 1973 by Red River Army Depot and Lone Star. Groundwater: Metals and explosives

Surface Water: VOCs detected.

Sediments: Metals.

Corrective Activities and Current Status: Letter from TWC (TNRCC) explaining that this landfill is a municipal solid waste landfill permitted and operated by Red River Army Deport [7]. Access has always been highly restricted and it will continue to be so in the future. Past, current, and future exposures to the general public are unlikely. Past, current, and future exposures to workers do not pose a public health hazard because visits are infrequent and/or conducted with PPE.
Site 4
Classification Yard
The Classification Yard is an area along the western Lone Star boundary. It has been used by Lone Star since 1941 as a receiving area for chemicals, materials, and supplies transported to Lone Star by rail. Red River Army Depot used it between 1941 and the late 1970s. Groundwater: There is contamination of groundwater with 2,6-dinitrotoluene, dieldrin, and RDX due to spills during materials handling. Corrective Activities and Current Status: Based on previous investigations, the TWC (TNRCC) agreed that no further RFI activities were required [7] referenced 8/12/92 letter. Access has always been highly restricted and it will continue to be so in the future. Past, current, and future exposures to the general public are unlikely. Past, current, and future exposures to workers do not pose a public health hazard because visits are infrequent and/or conducted with PPE.
Site 5
RDX and Pyrotechnic Pits
The RDX and Pyrotechnic Pits are eight small shallow pits at three separate sites (Sites 5A, 5B, and 5C) that were used between 1961-1980. These earthen pits are within production areas of Lone Star. With the exception of the pyrotechnic pit (G-33), these pits were used for disposal of wastewater contaminated with explosives and heavy metals. The Pyrotechnic pit (G-33) was used for wastes suspected of containing nitrates, chlorates, barium, chromium, and lead. Soil: Metals exceeding health-based screening values included arsenic. Explosives exceeding health-based screening values included RDX and HMX,

Groundwater: Nickel was the only metal to exceed health-based screening values.

Surface Water: No metals or explosives exceeded health-based screening values.

Sediment: Metals exceeding health-based screening values included arsenic, beryllium, lead, and vanadium. No pesticides exceeded health-based screening values.

Corrective Activities: Site 5A was the Area B (B-46) RDX pit; it has been destroyed [3].
Site 5B includes RDX pits K-2, P-23, P-25, Q-22, and Q-23. Pits P-2 and Q-22 were filled, covered, and seeded in the early 1980s; the remaining pits are uncapped but inactive.
Site 5C is a pyrotechnic pit located in Area G and identified as G-33. No explosives were found in Site 5C pit and it does not appear to pose a threat to public health [3].
Current Status: Based on previous investigations, the TWC (predecessor to TNRCC) agreed that no further RFI activities were necessary at RDX Pit B-46 [7]. RDX Pit K-2 closed in 1998 under RRS 1. The RFI on the P and Q pits is being prepared for submission to the TNRCC. Pit G-33 is being investigated as part of the Area G Ponds.
Access has always been highly restricted and it will continue to be so in the future. Past, current, and future exposures to the general public are unlikely. Past, current, and future exposures to workers do not pose a public health hazard because visits are infrequent and/or conducted with PPE. No drinking water wells are located in this area. Past and current exposures to groundwater, therefore, have not occurred. It is unlikely that water production wells will be installed in the future.

Site 5C-No threat to public health. No public health hazard is associated with this site. No contaminants were detected above regulatory requirements.

Site 6
Area G Ponds
Three ponds in Area G (known as the North G ponds) were used to hold spent sulfuric, chromic, and nitric acids, sodium hydroxide, and rinse waters from the breakdown of shells. The ponds were used between 1942-1982. Wastewater was treated in situ with sodium hydroxide to precipitate metals. The site covers approximately 5 acres with the three ponds covering a total of about 1.2 acres. Groundwater: Metals exceeding health-based screening values included chromium and manganese (however, metals samples were filtered). Nitrates/nitrites exceeded health-based screening values. Corrective Activities: The three ponds were filled, covered, and seeded in 1983-1984.
Current Status: Groundwater is currently monitored at the site according to closure requirements.
Access has always been highly restricted and it will continue to be so in the future. Past, current, and future exposures to the general public are unlikely. Past, current, and future exposures to workers do not pose a public health hazard because visits are infrequent and/or conducted with PPE. No drinking water wells are located in this area. Past and current exposures to groundwater, therefore, have not occurred. It is unlikely that water production wells will be installed in the future.
Site 7
Area O Ponds
The Area O ponds (known as the South O ponds) were seven ponds used for solids settling of "pink water" effluent. The site covers approximately 14 acres with the ponds covering an estimated 6.1 acres. The ponds were used from 1942 to 1978. Groundwater: Manganese was the only metal exceeding health-based screening values. Explosives exceeding health-based screening values included trinitrotoluene and RDX. Corrective Activities: They were filled, covered, and seeded according to TWC and EPA approved closure plans in 1982.
Current Status: Groundwater is monitored at the site according to closure requirements.
Access has always been highly restricted and it will continue to be so in the future. Past, current, and future exposures to the general public are unlikely. Past, current, and future exposures to workers do not pose a public health hazard because visits are infrequent and/or conducted with PPE. No drinking water wells are located in this area. Past and current exposures to groundwater, therefore, have not occurred. It is unlikely that water production wells will be installed in the future.
Site 8
Area P and Q Settling Pits
Area P and Q Settling Pits include nineteen pits associated with sumps that were used for disposal of contaminated wastewater in production areas P and Q. These shallow earthen pits were used from 1951 - 1979. (See RDX Pyrotechnic data information) Current Status: These pits are part of the RDX and Pyrotechnic Pits investigation. Groundwater flow from the site is minimal and site access has always been highly restricted and it will continue to be so in the future. Past, current, and future exposures to the general public are unlikely. Past, current, and future exposures to workers do not pose a public health hazard because visits are infrequent and/or conducted with PPE.
Site 9
Eastern Inactive Landfill
The Eastern Inactive Landfill was used for disposal of construction debris between 1951-1985. Soil: Metals exceeding health-based screening values included beryllium, manganese, nickel and zinc.

Groundwater: Metals exceeding health-based screening values included antimony, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, and manganese. VOCs did not exceed health-based screening values.

Surface Water: Metals did not exceed health-based screening values.

Sediment: Metals exceeding health based screening values included arsenic and beryllium. VOCs did not exceed health-based screening values.

Corrective Activities and Current Status: Although the site became inactive in 1985, no closure requirements were developed for the site.
Monitoring wells were installed around this site in 1983 and 1988. Lone Star plans to do additional RFI sampling.
Access has always been highly restricted and it will continue to be so in the future. Past, current, and future exposures to the general public are unlikely. Past, current, and future exposures to workers do not pose a public health hazard because visits are infrequent and/or conducted with PPE.
Site 10
Eastern Active Landfill
The Eastern Active Landfill is permitted for disposal of general refuse and has been in operation since August 1985. Landfill permitted, constructed, and operated according to permit requirements; no hazardous wastes are expected to be associated with it. Current Status: Monitoring wells were installed in 1980, no water quality data was available for evaluation. RFI was not required for this site and reference to the Part B Permit is made. Access has always been highly restricted and it will continue to be so in the future. Past, current, and future exposures to the general public are unlikely. Past, current, and future exposures to workers do not pose a public health hazard because visits are infrequent and/or conducted with PPE.
Site 11
Wells/Cisterns
Site 11, which consists of cisterns or dug wells located throughout this installation, is subdivided into Sites 11A and 11B. Each of the Cisterns has been designated by a Roman numeral: I through XX. Site 11A consists of two structures (Cisterns V and VI) that were previously part of a temporary water treatment plant supplying water for the installation. Site 11B consists of 17 dug wells or cisterns located throughout the installation. These are thought to have been constructed by individual landowners prior to construction of Lone Star; however, information concerning the original uses of these structures are not available. Since Lone Star began operation, some of these structures have been used as disposal sites for obsolete drugs, inert munition parts, and security badges. The metal cadmium and VOCs were detected within 7 of the 17 cisterns. Corrective Activities: Only 7 of these cisterns were found to be contaminated. These cisterns have been closed to RRS 1.
Current Status: The closure report is being prepared for submission to the TNRCC [8].
Direct human contact with contents of the cisterns is unlikely since site access has always been highly restricted and it will continue to be so in the future. Past, current, and future exposures to the general public are unlikely. Past, current, and future exposures to workers do not pose a public health hazard because visits are infrequent and/or conducted with PPE.
Site 12
High Explosive Burning Ground
The High Explosive Burning Ground includes four abandoned earthen pits that were previously used for burning articles contaminated with explosives. This area was first used in the late 1940s. Soil: Metals exceeding health-based screening values included arsenic beryllium cadmium, thallium and zinc. The only explosive exceeding health-based screening values was 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene.

Groundwater: Metals exceeding health-based comparison values included antimony, arsenic, chromium, manganese, and nickel.

Sediment: Metals exceeding health-based comparison values included antimony, arsenic, cadmium, lead, and thallium. Explosives did not exceed health-based screening values.

Current Status: Monitoring wells were installed in 1983 and 1985. Concrete pads and rectangular metal pads within this area are now used for burning operations. Lone Star is permitted to burn up to 14,500 pounds per day at this site. The site operating plan requires 5,000' of clear air space during burning and if the weather is overcast they do not burn. This site is active. Access has always been highly restricted and it will continue to be so in the future. Burning is infrequent and only is conducted when weather conditions are optimal for minimizing the potential for exposures to the public. Past, current, and future exposures to the general public are unlikely. Past, current, and future exposures to workers do not pose a public health hazard because visits are infrequent and/or conducted with PPE.
Site 13
Road Oil Burial Site
In 1973-1974 an estimated 7,500 gallons of road oil was disposed of in an earthen pit in this area. Oil was observed on the surface at this site in 1987. Soil: Metals exceeding health-based screening values included arsenic and vanadium.

Groundwater: Metals exceeding health-based screening values included beryllium, cadmium, manganese, nickel and zinc. VOCs were detected.

Sediment: Arsenic was the only metal exceeding health-based screening values.

Current Status: Monitoring wells were installed at in 1985. Purgeable organics were detected in site wells immediately following installation in 1985 but have not been detected since. Access has always been highly restricted and it will continue to be so in the future. Past, current, and future exposures to the general public are unlikely. Past, current, and future exposures to workers do not pose a public health hazard because visits are infrequent and/or conducted with PPE.
Site 14
Old Demolition Area
This 19 acre area was used in 1943-1944 for the disposal of explosives by detonation. Groundwater is contaminated with metals (arsenic, chromium, lead, mercury, and selenium) and explosives (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) but contaminants do not appear to be migrating.

Surface soils are contaminated with heavy metals, explosive (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) debris, and metal fragments. Buried metal objects likely associated with unexploded ordnance (UXO) have also been mapped at the site and were found to extend beyond the fenced perimeter to the north.

No carcinogens were detected in surface water.

Corrective Activities: Timber cleared in 1986 and explosive debris collected from the surface and destroyed. Additional debris has since been exposed by weathering. A fence has been installed around the area.
Current Status: National Priorities List site being addressed by EPA. Record of Decision anticipated in 1999.
Access has always been highly restricted and it will continue to be so in the future. Past, current, and future exposures to the general public are unlikely. Past, current, and future exposures to workers do not pose a public health hazard because visits are infrequent and/or conducted with PPE. No drinking water wells are located in this area. Past and current exposures to groundwater, therefore, have not occurred. It is unlikely that water production wells will be installed in the future.

The future use of groundwater at this site as a potable source is not recommended due to lead.

Site 15
Current Demolition Ground (aka High Explosive Demolition Ground)
The Current Demolition Ground is a 100 acre site, used since the mid-1940s for the aboveground and below ground disposal of explosives by detonation. Soil: Metals, Explosives none exceeded health-based comparison values.

Groundwater: Metals - Antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, chromium, lead, manganese, and nickel exceeded health-based comparison values. Explosives were detected in groundwater; the explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene exceeded its health-based comparison values.

Sediment: Metals none exceeded background and/or health-based comparison values (arsenic was below background concentrations). Explosives and VOCs were below detection

Surface Water: Metals arsenic, cadmium, and lead exceeded health-based comparison values. Explosives 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene exceeded health-based comparison values. VOCs tetrachloroethene, and 1,1,2-trichloroethane exceeded health-based comparison values.

Current Status: Monitoring wells were installed in 1983 and 1985. This unit has impacted groundwater.Lone Star is permitted to detonate 5,400 pounds per day at this site. The site operating plan requires 5,000' of clear air space during detonation and if the weather is overcast they do not detonate. This site is active. Access has always been highly restricted and it will continue to be so in the future. Detonation of material is infrequent and is conducted only when weather conditions are optimal for minimizing the potential for exposures to the public. Past, current, and future exposures to the general public are unlikely. Past, current, and future exposures to workers do not pose a public health hazard because visits are infrequent and/or conducted with PPE.
Site 16
Old Chemical Burial Site
55 gallon drums of sulfuric and chromic acid and industrial organics were reported to have been buried at this site between 1950 to 1979. The site is reportedly located near the southern installation boundary and covers less than 1 acre. Several heavy metals (chromium, lead, and mercury) have been detected in groundwater samples collected from Site 16 at concentrations exceeding applicable standards. Groundwater monitoring at the site subsequent to April 4, 1986 shows metals concentrations to be below standards. Current Status: Results of a geophysical survey in 1988 do not support the reported burial of 50 55-gallon drums in the identified site area [3]. It is possible that 1)The reported event never occurred, 2)It occurred at another location, 3)Waste disposal did occur at the site but instead of the drums being buried, the spent waste liquids were poured out of the drums onto the ground and the drums were disposed of offsite. TWC (TNRCC) determined based on previous investigations that chemical burial sites numbers 1-6 were phantom units and therefore did not require further RFI studies or deed recordation (8/12/92 TWC letter was referenced [7]. Access has always been highly restricted and it will continue to be so in the future. Past, current, and future exposures to the general public are unlikely. Past, current, and future exposures to workers do not pose a public health hazard because visits are infrequent and/or conducted with PPE. No drinking water wells are located in this area. Past and current exposures to groundwater, therefore, have not occurred. It is unlikely that water production wells will be installed in the future.

A current exposure pathway to humans via groundwater is not present and future use of groundwater at this site is unlikely.

Site 17
Salvage Yard
The Salvage Yard is an area along the northern installation boundary, used since mid-1940s for temporary storage of salvageable materials. It was also used for drum storage of spent solvents and waste oils. PCB transformers were stored outdoors here in the past. Surface soil: Elevated concentrations of metals, including cadmium, were detected onsite.

Sediments from drainage ditch at the site had concentrations of heavy metals above background.

Unacceptable levels of cadmium in soil via inhalation of dust.

Groundwater is not of significant quantity at the site.

Current Status: Based on previous investigations the TWC (TNRCC) agreed that no further RFI activities were required (8/12/92-TWC letter referenced) [7]. Access has always been highly restricted and it will continue to be so in the future. Past, current, and future exposures to the general public are unlikely. Past, current, and future exposures to workers do not pose a public health hazard because visits are infrequent and/or conducted with PPE.
Site 19
Bulk Fuel Storage Area
The Bulk Fuel Storage Area consisted of four 10,000 gallon underground gasoline tanks that supply the vehicle service station north of Area G. Two of the tanks were made of steel and were installed in the early 1980s with cathodic protection. The other two tanks were installed in the early 1940s without cathodic protection. During the Spring of 1987, the concrete collar around the fill line on one of the old tanks was discovered to be leaking, as was the vent and/or return line of the other older tank. Groundwater: VOCs exceeding health-based comparison values included benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, 1,2-dichloroethane, and automotive gasoline. Lead also exceeded its EPA action level of 15 ppb in water. Corrective Activities: A leak was discovered and stopped in December 1988. Two tanks were taken out of service in July 1987.
Current Status: The Bureau of Economic Geology study confirmed that the extent of groundwater contamination is limited and the conditions of the plumes are static. In the summer of 1998 this was confirmed since no water accumulated in borings. The TNRCC decided to close the site. The contractor is preparing the final report.
Access has always been highly restricted and it will continue to be so in the future. Past, current, and future exposures to the general public are unlikely. Past, current, and future exposures to workers do not pose a public health hazard because visits are infrequent and/or conducted with PPE.
Site 20
Chromium-Plating Area
A chromium plating operation in the machine shop of Building I-30 resulted in the generation of chromium-contaminated wastewater. The transport of chromium-plating wastewater from I-30 to Area G ponds for disposal was begun in the late 1960s and continued until an underground storage tank was installed along the southwest corner of the I-30 building in 1979. Site 20 consists of the area surrounding the underground storage tank and the drainage ditch adjacent to I-30. Groundwater at Site 20 does not appear to have been impacted by wastewater releases.

Surface soils at the site and drainage ditch sediments downgradient of the site have elevated levels of chromium, lead, and barium

Corrective Activities and Current Status: Monitoring wells were installed in this area in September 1987. Based on previous investigations, the TWC (TNRCC) agreed that no further RFI activities were required (8/12/92 TWC letter referenced) [7] Access has always been highly restricted and it will continue to be so in the future. Past, current, and future exposures to the general public are unlikely. Past, current, and future exposures to workers do not pose a public health hazard because visits are infrequent and/or conducted with PPE.
Abandoned Landfill 2 Lone Star is developing information on this site to submit to the TNRCC. Soil: Metals Chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, thallium, vanadium, and zinc exceed background; only thallium exceeded health-based comparison values (background concentration also above HAC) Corrective Activities and Current Status: Lone Star is developing the RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) Work Plan. Access has always been highly restricted and it will continue to be so in the future. Past, current, and future exposures to the general public are unlikely. Past, current, and future exposures to workers do not pose a public health hazard because visits are infrequent and/or conducted with PPE. No drinking water wells are located in this area. Past and current exposures to groundwater, therefore, have not occurred. It is unlikely that water production wells will be installed in the future.
Abandoned Construction Landfill Lone Star is developing information on this site to submit to the TNRCC. Soil: Metals only copper exceeded background very slightly and no comparison values were available. VOCs Although detected above background methylene chloride and toluene did not exceed health-based comparison values. No health-based comparison values were available to evaluate Total Hydrocarbons.

Groundwater: Metals none exceeded health-based comparison values

Surface Water: Metals, VOCs - None exceeded background and health-based comparison values.

Sediment: Metals and VOCs - only arsenic exceeded health based comparison values for cancer. No comparison values were available for TPH.

Corrective Activities and Current Status: Lone Star is developing the RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) Work Plan. Access has always been highly restricted and it will continue to be so in the future. Past, current, and future exposures to the general public are unlikely. Past, current, and future exposures to workers do not pose a public health hazard because visits are infrequent and/or conducted with PPE. No drinking water wells are located in this area. Past and current exposures to groundwater, therefore, have not occurred. It is unlikely that water production wells will be installed in the future.
Landfill Near Area W Lone Star is developing information on this site to submit to the TNRCC. Soil: Metals all below background concentrations

Groundwater: Metals barium chromium, copper, and lead above background concentrations. Only Arsenic exceeded cancer risk evaluation guide, but it was not above background concentrations. No comparison value was available for copper but concentration was 2x background. VOCs only TCE exceeded carcinogenic risk evaluation guide. No comparison value was available for TPH

Surface Water: Metals none exceeded background concentrations. VOCs - only bis(2eh)phthalate was detected but it did not exceed health-based comparison values. No health-based comparison values were available for TPH.

Sediment: Metals all exceeded background concentrations. Only Arsenic exceeded carcinogenic risk evaluation guide. VOCs - None exceeded health-based comparison values. No health-based comparison values were available for TPH.

Corrective Activities and Current Status: Lone Star is revising the RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) Work Plan. Access has always been highly restricted and it will continue to be so in the future. Past, current, and future exposures to the general public are unlikely. Past, current, and future exposures to workers do not pose a public health hazard because visits are infrequent and/or conducted with PPE. No drinking water wells are located in this area. Past and current exposures to groundwater, therefore, have not occurred. It is unlikely that water production wells will be installed in the future.
Area W Wells Lone Star is developing information on this site to submit to the TNRCC. Soil: Metals None exceeded background concentrations Corrective Activities and Current Status: Lone Star is developing the RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) Work Plan. Access has always been highly restricted and it will continue to be so in the future. Past, current, and future exposures to the general public are unlikely. Past, current, and future exposures to workers do not pose a public health hazard because visits are infrequent and/or conducted with PPE. No drinking water wells are located in this area. Past and current exposures to groundwater, therefore, have not occurred. It is unlikely that water production wells will be installed in the future.
XX Test Area Lone Star is developing information on this site to submit to the TNRCC. Soil: Metals all exceeded background concentrations; only arsenic and beryllium exceeded health-based comparison values for carcinogenic risk.
Groundwater: Metals most exceeded background concentrations of metals in water. Arsenic and beryllium exceeded health-based comparison values for cancer. Antimony, chromium, manganese, and nickel exceeded health-based comparison values for non-cancer effects.

Sediments: Metals only arsenic exceeded both background concentrations of metals and health-based comparison value for carcinogenic risk.

Corrective Activities and Current Status: Lone Star is developing the RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) Work Plan. Access has always been highly restricted and it will continue to be so in the future. Past, current, and future exposures to the general public are unlikely. Past, current, and future exposures to workers do not pose a public health hazard because visits are infrequent and/or conducted with PPE. No drinking water wells are located in this area. Past and current exposures to groundwater, therefore, have not occurred. It is unlikely that water production wells will be installed in the future.
K-15 North and K-15 South Lone Star is developing information on this site to submit to the TNRCC. Soil: Metals detected above background concentrations and above health-based comparison values included antimony, lead and thallium.
Surface Water: Metals arsenic, lead and manganese exceeded health-based comparison values
Corrective Activities and Current Status: Lone Star is developing the RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) Work Plan. Access has always been highly restricted and it will continue to be so in the future. Past, current, and future exposures to the general public are unlikely. Past, current, and future exposures to workers do not pose a public health hazard because visits are infrequent and/or conducted with PPE. No drinking water wells are located in this area. Past and current exposures to groundwater, therefore, have not occurred. It is unlikely that water production wells will be installed in the future.
Landfill Near Area W 2 Lone Star is developing information on this site to submit to the TNRCC. Soil: Metals, VOCs, SVOCs, Pesticides, PCBs, TPH, Explosives were analyzed for. Many of the semivolatile organic compounds did not have health-based comparison values. The health-based comparison value for benzo(a)pyrene was exceeded for carcinogenic risk. Health-based comparison values for metals, pesticides, PCBs, and explosives were not exceeded.

Groundwater: Metals and explosives were analyzed for. Beryllium exceeded is health-based comparison value for carcinogenic risk. RDX and HMX exceeded health-based comparison values.

Corrective Activities and Current Status: Lone Star is developing the RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) Work Plan. Access has always been highly restricted and it will continue to be so in the future. Past, current, and future exposures to the general public are unlikely. Past, current, and future exposures to workers do not pose a public health hazard because visits are infrequent and/or conducted with PPE. No drinking water wells are located in this area. Past and current exposures to groundwater, therefore, have not occurred. It is unlikely that water production wells will be installed in the future.
Landfill Near Area W 3 Lone Star is developing information on this site to submit to the TNRCC. Soil: VOCs, SVOCs, metals, pesticides, TPH, and explosives were all below health-based comparison values.

Groundwater: Metals and explosives were below health-based comparison values except beryllium. Beryllium exceeded screening value for cancer risk; however, the concentration measured was very low (0.665 g/L) and site access is restricted, this water is not being used for drinking so the likelihood of exposure is low.

Corrective Activities and Current Status: Lone Star is developing the RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) Work Plan. Access has always been highly restricted and it will continue to be so in the future. Past, current, and future exposures to the general public are unlikely. Past, current, and future exposures to workers do not pose a public health hazard because visits are infrequent and/or conducted with PPE. No drinking water wells are located in this area. Past and current exposures to groundwater, therefore, have not occurred. It is unlikely that water production wells will be installed in the future.
B-8 Batter Washdown Sump Lone Star is developing information on this site to submit to the TNRCC. Soil: Metals concentrations were below background soil concentrations or below health-based comparison values Corrective Activities and Current Status: Lone Star is revising the RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) Work Plan. Access has always been highly restricted and it will continue to be so in the future. Past, current, and future exposures to the general public are unlikely. Past, current, and future exposures to workers do not pose a public health hazard because visits are infrequent and/or conducted with PPE. No drinking water wells are located in this area. Past and current exposures to groundwater, therefore, have not occurred. It is unlikely that water production wells will be installed in the future.

No public health hazard is associated with this site. Contaminants were detected below background concentrations or below health-based comparison values with the exception of beryllium which was measured above its CREG of 0.2 ppm but not above non-cancer chronic EMEG of 10/100. Due to restricted access it is not likely that individuals would have sufficient exposure to increase their risk of developing cancer.


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