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HEALTH CONSULTATION

CIRCUITRON CORPORATION
FARMINGDALE, NASSSU COUNTY, NEW YORK

 

APPENDIX A


Figure 1
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APPENDIX B


Recommendations From 1993 Public Health Assessment and Recommendations From 1995 Health Consultation

Recommendations From 1993 Public Health Document:

1. Groundwater quality needs to be monitored upgradient and downgradient from the site and in the general path of groundwater flow. A monitoring well(s) should be positioned at a suitable location between Schmitt Boulevard and Gazza Boulevard to identify any encroaching contamination that may affect downgradient municipal drinking water supply wells.

2. Public drinking water supply wells located downgradient from Circuitron Corporation site should continue to be monitored at frequent intervals to ensure that they are not being affected by site related contaminants. This monitoring is currently mandated by the State of New York. Should these wells become contaminated above drinking water standards, other municipal water supplies and/or treatment should be provided immediately. The SCDHS was contacted and advised of the sampling data concerning the Gazza Boulevard municipal drinking water supply well. NYS DOH has requested SCDHS to sample this well for volatile and semi-volatile compounds.

3. Additional groundwater investigation is needed to determine the full extent and degree of aquifer contamination in the area. This step is essential to design remedial measures to treat the groundwater contamination effectively.

4. Present and future access to the site should be restricted to prevent possible exposures. Damaged and/or ill-fitting sections of fencing and gates should be repaired or replaced. Openings into the facility should also be closed or covered. Drums stored inside the facility should be inventoried and removed in an approved manner. Contaminated building dust should be removed from inside the abandoned Circuitron building to allow for possible future use of the building.

5. The safety of on-site remedial workers and the surrounding community should be addressed during activities which will disturb the existing contaminated soils, sediment, and underground structures. Optimal dust control measures should be used and perimeter monitoring for vapors and particulates should be implemented during the remedial activities to ensure the safety of all nearby residents. Appropriate protective clothing and respiratory protection should be worn by workers during excavations at the site. On-site remedial workers should follow appropriate National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidelines and recommendations.

6. The potential for impacts to indoor air quality at nearby businesses should be evaluated by taking soil gas measurements near the site. These data will determine the need for further air sampling at nearby businesses.

7. US EPA should review groundwater sampling records and methods to determine plausible reason(s) for the discrepancy in sampling results obtained for monitoring well MW-4S during the RI. Recommendations from 1995 Health Consultation The NYS DOH recommends implementation of the remedial activities planned for the Circuitron site. Demolition of the abandoned Circuitron building should proceed in a timely manner. The NYS DOH will review the remedial design workplan for a worker and community health and safety plan and provide recommendations as needed.

Recommendations from 1995 Health Consultation

The NYS DOH recommends implementation of the remedial activities planned for the Circuitron site. Demolition of the abandoned Circuitron building should proceed in a timely manner. The NYS DOH will review the remedial design workplan for a worker and community health and safety plan and provide recommendations as needed.

 

APPENDIX C

New York State Department of Health Procedure for Evaluating
Potential Health Risks for Contaminants of Concern

To evaluate the potential health risks from contaminants of concern associated with the GCL Tie and Treating, Inc. site, the New York State Department of Health assessed the risks for cancer and noncancer health effects.

Increased cancer risks were estimated by using site-specific information on exposure levels for the contaminant of concern and interpreting them using cancer potency estimates derived for that contaminant by the US EPA or, in some cases, by the NYS DOH. The following qualitative ranking of cancer risk estimates, developed by the NYS DOH, was then used to rank the risk from very low to very high. For example, if the qualitative descriptor was "low", then the excess lifetime cancer risk from that exposure is in the range of greater than one per million to less than one per ten thousand. Other qualitative descriptors are listed below:

 

Excess Lifetime Cancer Risk
Risk Ratio Qualitative Descriptor

equal to or less than one in a million

very low

greater than one in a million to less than one in ten thousand

low

one in ten thousand to less than one in a thousand

moderate

one in a thousand to less than one in ten

high

equal to or greater than one in ten

very high

An estimated increased excess lifetime cancer risk is not a specific estimate of expected cancers. Rather, it is a plausible upper bound estimate of the probability that a person may develop cancer sometime in his or her lifetime following exposure to that contaminant.

There is insufficient knowledge of cancer mechanisms to decide if there exists a level of exposure to a cancer-causing agent below which there is no risk of getting cancer, namely, a threshold level. Therefore, every exposure, no matter how low, to a cancer-causing compound is assumed to be associated with some increased risk. As the dose of a carcinogen decreases, the chance of developing cancer decreases, but each exposure is accompanied by some increased risk.

There is general consensus among the scientific and regulatory communities on what level of estimated excess cancer risk is acceptable. An increased lifetime cancer risk of one in one million or less is generally considered an insignificant increase in cancer risk.

For noncarcinogenic health risks, the contaminant intake was estimated using exposure assumptions for the site conditions. This dose was then compared to a risk reference dose (estimated daily intake of a chemical that is likely to be without an appreciable risk of health effects) developed by the US EPA, ATSDR and/or NYS DOH. The resulting ratio was then compared to the following qualitative scale of health risk:

Qualitative Descriptions for Noncarcinogenic Health Risks

Ratio of Estimated Contaminant Qualitative Intake to Risk Reference Dose Descriptor

Qualitative Descriptor
Equal to or less than the minimal reference dose or minimal risk level minimal
Greater than one to five times low the reference dose or minimal risk level low
Greater than five to ten times moderate the reference dose or minimal risk level moderate
Greater than ten times the high reference dose or minimal risk level high

Noncarcinogenic effects unlike carcinogenic effects are believed to have a threshold, that is, a dose below which adverse effects will not occur. As a result, the current practice is to identify, usually from animal toxicology experiments, a no-observed-effect-level (NOEL).

 

APPENDIX D

PUBLIC HEALTH HAZARD CATEGORIES

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