Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to site content

PUBLIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT

SARNEY FARM
AMENIA, DUTCHESS COUNTY, NEW YORK

 

CONCLUSIONS

Based upon information reviewed, this site is an indeterminate public health hazard. As noted in the previous section, human exposure to low levels of several organic chemicals is currently occurring via ingestion of drinking water from off-site private wells. The levels of contamination found in these private drinking water supplies are below health-based standards and would not be expected to cause any adverse health effects. On-site monitoring wells in both the shallow and deep aquifers have confirmed the presence of several organic contaminants at levels that exceed NYS or Federal drinking water standards. The available information on the extent of vertical and horizontal groundwater contamination attributed to the site is incomplete. Contaminant levels and groundwater flow direction in the bedrock aquifer could not be determined adequately because of the restricted number and placement of deep monitoring wells as well as the construction technique used. Until a complete characterization of the groundwater contaminant plume or plumes has been completed, the full extent of present and future effects on drinking water supplies in the area cannot be determined. Work is presently being conducted to remove the sources of groundwater contamination and a groundwater monitoring network has been established to detect any migration of contaminants towards residential wells. However, contaminated off-site private wells are to the east and south of the site where there are no existing monitoring wells in either the shallow or bedrock aquifers. The current use of private wells for drinking water and other domestic uses, makes contaminated groundwater a health concern for residents near the Sarney Site.

Contaminated soils and drummed wastes buried on site may result in potential human exposures through two mechanisms: as a continuing source of groundwater contamination and through direct contact, ingestion, and vapor emission. Of these two, the effect of the contaminated soils as a source of present and future groundwater contamination has the most serious effect on public health through potential exposure to contaminated groundwater. As part of the remedial activity proposed for this site, all buried drums and contaminated soils surrounding the drums will be removed from the site.

Anticipated remedial activities, which will remove buried drums and contaminated soils, will increase the exposure to the on-site remedial workers and the surrounding community. Exposure through inhalation of vapors or particulates, ingestion, and dermal contact could be expected from excavation and disturbance of these soils, only if Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) guidelines and recommendations are not followed.

RECOMMENDATIONS

  1. Private drinking water supply wells along Bensen Hill Road and Poplar Hill Road should be monitored quarterly to insure that they are not contaminated by site related contaminants. If wells become contaminated above NYS DOH standards, an alternative water supply or treatment should be provided and will be requested by NYS DOH. Currently, no off-site wells are contaminated above the NYS DOH drinking water standards; however, this could change, and is the basis for continued monitoring. The risk to residents would be eliminated with the provision of alternate water for drinking, cooking, and bathing. Procedures should be put in place to ensure that people whose private wells have been sampled receive their test results along with an interpretation promptly.

  2. Additional environmental investigations should be completed to define further the nature and extent of groundwater contamination associated with the Sarney Site. This is especially needed in Area 2 of the site.

  3. Access to the contaminated areas at the site should be restricted to prevent exposures to contaminated soils. If contaminated soils will remain after the proposed remedial activities, institutional controls should be implemented to prevent future development of the property.

  4. The safety of on-site remedial workers and the surrounding community should be addressed during activities which will disturb the existing contaminated soils and buried wastes at the site. Dust and vapor control along with perimeter monitoring should be implemented during the remedial activities. NIOSH and OSHA guidelines and recommendations should be followed by those completing on-site investigations.

HEALTH ACTIVITIES RECOMMENDATION PANEL (HARP) RECOMMENDATION

The data and information developed in the public health assessment for the Sarney Farm site, Amenia, New York, have been evaluated by ATSDR's Health Activities Recommendation Panel (HARP) for appropriate follow up with respect to health activities. Although low level exposure to contaminated drinking water has occurred in the past, this site is not being considered for follow-up health activities at this time because the exposure was below levels likely to cause illness and disease. The panel determined, however, that community health education should be performed; that is, persons should be notified of the results of testing of water from their private wells and health implications, if contamination is found. If additional data or information become available suggesting that human exposure to hazardous substances, at levels likely to cause illness and disease, is currently occurring or has occurred in the past, ATSDR will reevaluate this site for any indicated follow up.

PUBLIC HEALTH ACTIONS

The Public Health Action Plan (PHAP) for the Sarney Property site contains a description of actions to be taken by ATSDR, US EPA, and/or the New York State Department of Health (NYS DOH) at and near the site subsequent to the completion of this public health assessment. The purpose of the PHAP is to ensure that this health assessment not only identifies public health hazards, but provides a plan of action designed to mitigate and prevent adverse human health effects resulting from exposure to hazardous substances in the environment. Included, is a commitment on the part of ATSDR/NYS DOH to follow up on this plan to ensure that it is implemented. The public health actions to be implemented are as follows:

  1. The NYS DOH and US EPA will carry out sampling and testing of selected area private residential wells to ensure that these potable supplies are suitable for use and to assess the potential for contamination from the site. NYS DOH will submit copies of the testing results accompanied with an interpretation to all residents involved in future DOH sampling programs to educate the community on the public health significance of any contaminants in their private well water.

  2. NYS DOH will coordinate with the appropriate agencies regarding actions to be taken in response to those recommendations provided in this public health assessment for which no plan of action has yet been developed.

  3. NYS DOH will provide an annual follow-up to this PHAP, outlining the actions completed and those in progress. This report will be placed in repositories that contain copies of this public health assessment, and will be provided to persons who request it.

CERTIFICATION

The Public Health Assessment for the Sarney Property site was prepared by the New York State Department of Health under a cooperative agreement with the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). It is in accordance with approved methodology and procedures existing at the time the public health assessment was initiated.

Gregory V. Ulirsch
Technical Project Officer, SPS, RPB, DHAC

The Division of Health Assessment and Consultation (DHAC), ATSDR, has reviewed this Public Health Assessment and concurs with its findings.

Robert C. Williams
Division Director, DHAC, ATSDR

 

PREPARERS OF THE REPORT

Kim L. Mann
Program Research Specialist III

and

Lloyd R. Wilson
Public Health Specialist (Environmental) III

Bureau of Environmental Exposure Investigation
NYS Department of Health

 

ATSDR REGIONAL REPRESENTATIVE

Arthur Block
Regional Operations
Office of the Assistant
Administrator, ATSDR

ATSDR TECHNICAL PROJECT OFFICER

Greg Ulirsch
Technical Project Officer
Division of Health Assessment
and Consultation, Remedial Programs Branch


REFERENCES

  1. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). 1989a. Toxicological Profile for 1,2-Dichloroethane. ATSDR/TP-89/10. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Atlanta, Georgia: U.S. Public Health Service.

  2. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). 1989b. Toxicological Profile for Toluene. ATSDR/TP-89/23. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Atlanta, Georgia: U.S. Public Health Service.

  3. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). 1989c. Toxicological Profile for Trichloroethylene. ATSDR/TP-88/24. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Atlanta, Georgia: U.S. Public Health Service.

  4. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). 1989d. Toxicological Profile for Vinyl Chloride. ATSDR/TP-88/25. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Atlanta, Georgia: U.S. Public Health Service.

  5. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). 1990a. Toxicological Profile for 2-Butanone. Draft. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Atlanta, Georgia: U.S. Public Health Service.

  6. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). 1990b. Toxicological Profile for Di-n-butylphthalate. ATSDR/TP-90/10. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Atlanta, Georgia: U.S. Public Health Service.

  7. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). 1990c. Toxicological Profile for 1,1-Dichloroethane. ATSDR/TP-90/12. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Atlanta, Georgia: U.S. Public Health Service.

  8. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). 1990d. Toxicological Profile for cis-1,2-Dichloroethene, trans-1,2-Dichloroethene and 1,2-Dichloroethene. Draft. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Atlanta, Georgia: U.S. Public Health Service.

  9. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). 1990e. Toxicological Profile for Lead. ATSDR/TP-88/17. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Atlanta, Georgia: U.S. Public Health Service.

  10. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). 1990f. Toxicological Profile for Styrene. Draft. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Atlanta, Georgia: U.S. Public Health Service.

  11. Brodzinsky, R. and H.B. Singh. 1982. Volatile organic chemicals in the atmosphere: An assessment of available data. Menlo Park, CA: Atmospheric Science Center, SRI International Contract 68-02-3452.

  12. Clarke, L., C. Hudson, G. Laccetti, W. Stone and B. Ungerman. 1985. Study of metal concentrations in soil and surface sand of seven New York counties. Albany, NY: New York State Department of Health, Bureau of Toxic Substance Assessment. September, 1985.

  13. Dutchess County Environmental Management Council, Suspected Hazardous Waste Sites In Dutchess County, Monograph No. 1 Site 1-3, September 1982.

  14. Frank, R., K. Ishida and P. Suda. 1976. Metals in agricultural soils in Ontario. Can. J. Soil Science. 56: 181-196.

  15. McGovern, E.C. 1988. Background concentrations of 20 elements in soils with special regard for New York State. Albany, NY: New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

  16. NYS DEC Phase II Investigation Report, June 1985

  17. NYS DEC, Title 6, Chapter X, Parts 700-705, NYCRR, Water Quality Regulations Surface Water and Groundwater Classifications and Standards.

  18. NYS DOH Human Exposure Potential Ranking Model inspection form, 1985.

  19. NYS DOH, State Sanitary Code, Title 10, Part 5 NYCRR, Drinking Water Supplies, January 1990.

  20. Shacklette, H.T. and J.G. Boerngen. 1984. Element concentrations in soil and other surficial materials of the conterminous United States. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1270. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

  21. Singh et al. 1981. Atmospheric measurements of selected hazardous organic chemicals. EPA-600/53-81-032.

  22. US EPA, 40 CFR, Parts 141 and 142, National Primary Drinking Water Regulations; Final Rule. Federal Register/Vol. 52, No. 130/July 8, 1987.

  23. US EPA, 40 CRF, Parts 141 and 142, National Primary Drinking Water Regulations, Draft Phase II Federal Register Notice, March 17, 1988.

  24. 24. US EPA Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study. Ebasco, Final Remedial Investigation Report, Sarney Farm Property Site, Amenia, New York, May 1990.

  25. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). 1990. Health Effects Assessment Summary Tables. Fourth Quarter. FY1990. Cincinnati, OH. Environmental Criteria and Assessment Office.

Next Section       Table of Contents

  
 
USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, 4770 Buford Hwy NE, Atlanta, GA 30341
Contact CDC: 800-232-4636 / TTY: 888-232-6348

A-Z Index

  1. A
  2. B
  3. C
  4. D
  5. E
  6. F
  7. G
  8. H
  9. I
  10. J
  11. K
  12. L
  13. M
  14. N
  15. O
  16. P
  17. Q
  18. R
  19. S
  20. T
  21. U
  22. V
  23. W
  24. X
  25. Y
  26. Z
  27. #