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PUBLIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT

DELTA QUARRIES/STOTLER LANDFILL
ANTIS AND LOGAN TOWNSHIPS, BLAIR COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA


SUMMARY

The Delta Quarries/Stotler Landfill is a National Priorities List (NPL) site located approximately two miles north of Altoona in Antis and Logan Townships, Blair County, Pennsylvania. This site is an inactive, unpermitted municipal waste disposal facility which was closed in 1987. Previously, the site consisted of two separate landfills, the Stotler Landfill and the Parshall-Kruise Landfill. Hazardous substances from local industries were allegedly disposed of at the site by Barefoot's Sanitary Service. No information concerning specific quantities of waste material are available. Ground water was found to be contaminated with volatile organic compounds and metals. The major component of ground water flow appears to be toward the west, to the Little Juniata River. The communities of Pinecroft and East Altoona lie approximately one-mile north of the site and one-half mile south of the site, respectively. Pinecroft has an estimated population of 150 and East Altoona has an estimated population of 275. Residential dwellings are sporadically located in the area around the site. The nearest residential dwelling lies within 35 feet of the landfill. The majority of the homes within a one-mile radius of the site rely on private wells for their drinking water. Of these wells, only about five are located within 500 feet downgradient from the site. In the past, nearby residents were concerned about potential exposure to site contaminants through their well water. Environmental media associated with this site appear minimally affected by the landfill. There is no known public health risk, at this time, associated with the landfill and the site represents no apparent public health hazard. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry's Health Activities Recommendation Panel determined that community health education is needed to inform the individual(s) who were exposed in the past through the use of contaminated water from their private well of the health significance of their exposure. The Pennsylvania Department of Public Health has contacted this individual. Because there is no evidence of human exposure to contaminants at levels of public health concern, no further activities were indicated.


BACKGROUND

A. Site Description and History

The Delta Quarries/Stotler Landfill NPL is a site located about 2 miles north of Altoona in Antis and Logan Townships, Blair County, Pennsylvania. The site consists of a 137 acre property of which 57 acres were landfilled. The site is located in an area with significant topographical relief, with small isolated ponds and wetland areas. To the west of the site is Sixth Avenue and to the east is Sandy Bank Road (Appendix A).

The site was operated from 1964 to 1987 by various owners. In 1964, two adjacent waste landfilling operations, the Stotler and the Parshall/Kruise, commenced. These two operations merged in 1976 to form the Stotler landfill. Delta Quarries and Disposal purchased the Stotler landfill in 1978 and operated the facility until its closure in 1987. During site closure activities, a four-foot cap of soil was placed over the landfill. The cap was revegetated, erosion controls were implemented, and sedimentation basins were established. Currently, the site is readily accessible to the public.

Over the course of its active life, the site was a repository for municipal and industrial trash. Hazardous substances from local industries were allegedly disposed of at the site by Barefoot's Sanitary Service. Reports from previous landfill operators, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S.EPA) and the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources (DER) file information suggest that approximately 99.8 percent of the wastes contained in the landfill are municipal wastes (1). Sampling conducted by DER from 1982 to 1987 indicated that several volatile organic compounds (VOC's) and lead above regulatory limits were present in ground water and surface water off-site.

In 1986, the site was proposed for inclusion on the Superfund National Priorities List and in 1987, the U.S.EPA Exiting ATSDR Website and Delta Quarries and Disposal, Inc. entered into a Consent Order to conduct a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) at the site. A Preliminary Health Assessment was prepared by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) in November, 1988. For the purpose of this public health assessment, the site is defined as all areas within the landfill property boundary (Appendix A).

B. Site Visit

On January 7, 1991, a site visit was conducted by Robert M. Stroman, Thomas Hartman, and Peter Gearhart who are members of the Pennsylvania Department of Health's (PADOH) Health Assessment Team and Martin Kotsch, Environmental Engineer/Remedial Program Manager with the U.S.EPA. Areas of special interest included monitoring wells, sedimentation basins, surface drainage ditches, the decontamination pit, the landfill closure cap and the general condition of the landfill cover. During the site visit, Mr. Kotsch identified and discussed the significance of the areas of special interest.

The day of the site visit, there was no visual evidence of contamination. No on-site springs or seeps were identified. Surface drainage ditches leading to the sedimentation basins that ultimately discharge surface water off-site to the Little Juniata River were observed to be lined with large rocks. The temperature was approximately 25 degrees Fahrenheit and small quantities of ice in the drainage ditches provided visual evidence that the system functions properly. The sedimentation basins were observed to be dry and grass lined. The area between the sedimentation basins and Sandy Beach Road supported trees and shrubs. There was no evidence of significant soil erosion. The decontamination area previously used to clean equipment during closure procedures and the sedimentation basins were observed to be the only areas of the site that were uncapped. In addition, the fence used to secure the decontaminated area was not intact, thus, allowing direct access to the pit by the public.

At the time of the site visit, the site was not undergoing remediation, however, previous remedial activities were evident in that there was visual evidence the site was capped with soil, and grasses covered the bulk of the site. The clay cap appeared to be in good condition and there was no evidence of off-site migration of fugitive dust. Access to the site was observed not to be restricted or otherwise limited. Evidence of possible human activities at the site included a path across the top of the site. Bicycle or moped tracks were observed along the path in areas that were lightly covered with snow.

In general, the site was observed to be hilly, grass covered lands with no visible environmental transport routes.

C. Demographics, Land Use, and Natural Resource Use

The site is located in a rural area and surrounding land, to a limited extent, is used for residential purposes. Homes are sporadically located in the area around the site. The nearest residential dwelling lies within 35 feet of the landfill. Adjacent to the landfill to the north and south are wooded areas and to the east is an open field. Three junkyard operations lie to the west of the landfill. A municipal wastewater treatment plant Exiting ATSDR Website and a privately owned solid waste transfer station are located approximately 750 feet west of the site. Land use further north, south, and east of the site is primarily residential. Surrounding residential communities remain rural. The unincorporated communities of Pinecroft and East Altoona lie approximately one-mile north of the site and one-half mile south of the site, respectively. Pinecroft has an estimated population of 150 and East Altoona has an estimated population of 275. The populace of Pinecroft and East Altoona consist primarily of lower middle class Caucasians.

The site itself is dissected by the boundary of Antis and Logan Townships. The 1980 Census reports that Logan Township had a population of 12,183 of which only 26 were black (0.2 percent) and 33 were of Spanish origin (0.3 percent). Similarly, Antis Township had a population of 6,524 with only seven black (0.1 percent) and 24 persons of Spanish origin (0.4 percent). This area which is over 99 percent white is nearly equally represented by sex with 51.1 percent of the population being female (2). The 1990 Census indicates this area's population was reduced by a modest one percent (3). Neighboring Altoona City lost nine percent of its population since 1980. The per capita incomes for Antis and Logan Townships for 1985 were $8,847 and $9,072, respectively. This was slightly higher than the $8,567 per capita income for Blair County but lower than that of Pennsylvania ($10,288) (4).

Downtown Altoona City is approximately three miles from the site and has its own municipal water supply. There are no schools, hospitals, or nursing homes within a one-mile radius. This area is generally sparsely populated with only the extreme northeastern Corporate Boundary of Altoona within one mile of the site. The total population is estimated to be less than 1000. One Junior High School was found to be within two miles of the site in the unincorporated area of Greenwood. Beyond the two-mile radius is central City Altoona with the large Altoona High School (over 2000 pupils 1989), two junior high schools, ten elementary schools along with parochial and private schools (5,6). Four hospitals and two nursing homes are in Altoona (7,8).

D. Health Outcome Data

Health outcome data bases were not used in this report for reasons discussed in the Health Outcome Data Evaluaton Section.


COMMUNITY HEALTH CONCERNS

The Pennsylvania Department of Health is unaware of organized citizen action groups or widespread public health concern. In the past, nearby residents were concerned about potential exposure to site contaminants through their well water.

The PADOH placed a notice in The Altoona Mirror newspaper, Altoona, Pennsylvania, informing the public of the availability of the public health assessment report for Delta Quarries/Stotler Landfill site, Blair County. During the public comment period, between March 18 and April 30, 1992, the PADOH did not receive any comments.


ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION AND OTHER HAZARDS

The U.S. EPA Toxic Chemical Release Inventory data base was accessed by the PADOH through the National Library of Medicine's Toxicology Data Network and searched for estimated annual releases of toxic chemicals to the environment from industries within a 1-mile radius of the Delta Quarries/Stotler Landfill site. This search was conducted to identify possible facilities that could contribute to the ground water and other media contamination near the site. No significant releases which would affect the quality of the ground water or other media near the site were reported in the 1987 and 1988 data bases.

A. On-Site Contamination

During the course of the Remedial Investigation, the following on-site environmental media were identified and sampled to determine whether they were sources of environmental contamination and/or present a public health risk.

Soil Gas

A soil gas survey was performed on-site at 69 locations during October, 1988, to evaluate the nature, extent and relative concentrations, of gases emanating from the landfill. The results of the soil gas survey indicate that hydrocarbons are present, mostly in the form of methane, at concentrations ranging from non-detectable to greater than 1000 ppm. In general, the level of hydrocarbons appear to be random in terms of concentration and location. As the concentration of hydrocarbons, particularly methane, detected diminished with an increase in distance from the site, it is not likely that there would be significant off-site exposure to hydrocarbons. Neither the air characterization survey nor preliminary monitoring of the study area during the soil gas survey indicated elevated levels of hydrocarbons at a distance from the site (1).

Soil

During January 1990, a soil sample was collected from beneath the decontamination pit, to determine the impact of field investigation decontamination activities on subsoils. The sample was collected by Canonie Environmental and analyzed by Canonie Laboratory for the full organics Target Compound List (TCL) and inorganics Target Analyte List (TAL). The sample was collected by hand-augering to a depth of about 18 inches. A summary of the analysis is as follows:

Table 1. On-Site Contamination - Decontamination Pit (1)

Chemical Maximum Concentration (µg/kg)
Vinyl Chloride ND
1,1,1-Trichloroethane ND
Tetrachloroethene ND
1,2-Dichloroethene (total) ND
1,2-Dichloroethane ND
Lead (total) 14.0a

ND - Not detected.
a - mg/Kg

No on-site ground water or surface water sampling was performed. The site is capped and vegetated.

B. Off-Site Contamination

During the course of the Remedial Investigation, the following off-site environmental media were identified and sampled to determine whether they were sources of environmental contamination and/or present a public health risk.

Soil

During October 1988, seven off-site soil samples were obtained to determine the presence and extent of chemical compounds related to the landfill. During November 1988, 13 surface water samples were also obtained to evaluate the potential impacts of chemical migration via surface water and the potential affects of such compounds on off-site receptors. Soil samples were collected by hand-augering to a depth of 18 inches. The samples from both media were collected by Meiser and Earl, Inc., and analyzed by a contract laboratory for the full Target Compound List and Target Analyte List. A summary of the analysis is as follows:

Table 2. Off-Site Soil, Surface Water, and Sediment Contamination (1)

Chemical
Soilc
Surface Waterd
Sedimentc
Comparison Value for Surface Water
Maximum Concentration
µg/L
Source
Vinyl Chloride
ND
ND
ND
10
EMEG
Trichloroethane
ND
68.0
ND
NA
NA
Trichloroethene
7.0
73.0
14.0
5
MCL
Tetrachloroethene
ND
20.0
13.0
100
RfD
1,2-Dichloroethene (total)
42.0
190.0
48.0
70
LTHA
1,2-Dichloroethane
30.0
ND
ND
0.38
CREG
Lead (total)
34.4J
8.7J
295.0J
5
PMCL

c - µg/kg
d - µg/L
J - indicates quantitation is only approximate
ND - Not Detected
NA - Not Available
EMEG - ATSDR Environmental Media Evaluation Guide
MCL - EPA Maximum Contaminant Level
PMCL - EPA Proposed Maximum Contaminant Level
RfD - EPA Reference Dose
CREG - ATSDR Cancer Risk Evaluation Guide
LTHA - EPA Lifetime Health Advisory

Ground Water

During August and September, 1989, ground water samples from 19 off-site monitoring wells and 16 off-site residential wells were obtained to assess the quality of ground water and determine if detected chemical compounds could related to landfilling operations. The samples were analyzed by Canonie Laboratory. A summary of the analysis is as follows:

Table 3. Off-Site Ground Water Contamination (1)

Chemical
Residential Wells
Max. Conc. (µg/L)
Monitor Wells
Max. Conc. (µg/L)
Monitoring Wellsa
Conc. (µg/L)
Comparison Value
µg/L
Source
Vinyl Chloride
ND
35.0
ND
10
EMEG
1,1,1-Trichloroethane
ND
86.0J
ND
NA
NA
Trichloroethene
ND
65.0
12.5
5
MCL
Tetrachloroethene
ND (7.0)b
14.0
3.9
100
RfD
1,2-Dichloroethene (total)
ND
150.0
ND
70
LTHA
1,2-Dichloroethane
ND
13.0
ND
0.38
CREG
Lead (total)
16.6J
0.5
NT
5
PMCL

a - Retest performed 1/2/91 by EPA for VOC's with particular interest in Vinyl Chloride
J - indicates quantitation is only approximate
ND- Not Detected
NT - Not Tested
b - contamination found in one residential well prior to the Remedial Investigation and reported in the Preliminary Health Assessment (9).
NA - Not Available
EMEG - ATSDR Environmental Media Evaluation Guide
RfD - EPA Reference Dose
MCL - EPA Maximum Contaminant Level
PMCL - EPA Proposed Maximum Contaminant Level
LTHA - EPA Lifetime Health Advisory
CREG - ATSDR Cancer Risk Evaluation Guide

C. Quality Assurance and Quality Control

In preparing this public health assessment, the Pennsylvania Department of Health relies on the information provided in the referenced documents and assumes that adequate quality assurance and quality control measures were followed regarding chain-of-custody, laboratory procedures and data reporting. The validity of the analyses and conclusions drawn for this public health assessment is determined by the completeness and reliability of the referenced information.

D. Physical and Other Hazards

The site is capped and vegetated. The site has an uneven terrain and a steep rock-lined surface water drainageway that makes walking treacherous in that area.


PATHWAYS ANALYSIS

As discussed in the Site Description and History Subsection, past landfilling practices have resulted in contamination of ground water. The environmental and human exposure pathways associated with this site are discussed in the following subsections:

A. Environmental Pathways (Fate and Transport)

There are currently no known completed exposure pathways that would have a significant impact on public health associated with this site. However, exposure to contaminated ground water, in residential wells, represents a potential, future, completed exposure pathway with residents downgradient of the site being the most likely receptor population.

Eliminated Pathways

Soil, air and surface water are not likely human exposure pathways. The landfill is capped and vegetated. Testing of soils revealed the presence of low level contaminants which would not pose a public health threat. Surface water contamination did not exceed the water EMEGs for any of the contaminants of concern. There was no observable negative impact from the western wetland outflow on the Little Juniata River. However, any negative impact from the landfill on the surface water quality of the Little Juniata River would have been masked by the influence of the wastewater treatment plant.

Ground Water

Ground water flow is predominantly in bedrock with the aquifer behaving as a single unconfined unit. There is a slight ground water divide located off the northeast section of the landfill, near wells 17-88 and 18-88, corresponding to a sloping topographical transition to the east. Both surface and shallow ground water flow in this area drain northeast to Sandy Run. While the location of this divide changes with ground water fluctuations, it does not appear that any infiltrations from the landfill would flow eastward. Given that the ground water elevations in this area are near the surface, this ground water movement is considered a local flow phenomena.

Precipitation is the primary source of ground water recharge in the region and the topography indicates that the landfill could be a major potential ground water recharge area. The soil cap installed in 1987 would however limit this recharge. The presence of the wetland area west of the site is a potential ground water discharge, as is the Little Juniata River. Therefore, the compounds detected in the monitoring wells may have originated from the landfill and may be migrating towards the Little Juniata River.

The majority of the homes within a one-mile radius of the site rely on private wells from the Tonoloway formation for drinking water. Of the 16 residential wells, five are within 500 feet from the landfill and 11 are upgradient. The 11 upgradient wells are at a higher ground water elevation than the landfill and would not be affected by contaminants from the landfill.

B. Human Exposure Pathways

Potential for exposure to VOC's may occur through ingestion, inhalation, and dermal contact if the resident wells become contaminated. The RI did not detect VOCs in residential wells, however, it was reported in the Preliminary Health Assessment that tetrachloroethene was detected at levels above the MCL in one residential well (9).

Exposure to lead may occur through ingestion of contaminants in residential wells even though it cannot be linked to the site because the contaminant plume from the site does not include lead.

Relatively high levels of methane were detected on site. Although no measurable levels of methane were detected at the landfill perimeter, the potential exists for methane to migrate off-site and then into nearby homes resulting in indoor residential exposures.


PUBLIC HEALTH IMPLICATIONS

A. Toxicological Evaluation

Introduction

In this section, we will discuss the health effects of people who are exposed or have potential for exposure to site contaminants. To evaluate health effects, either a Minimum Risk Level (MRL) for contaminants developed by ATSDR or Reference Dose (RfD) developed by EPA has been used. The MRL is an estimate of daily exposure to a contaminant below which non-cancer adverse health effects are unlikely to occur. The RfD is an estimate of a daily exposure (mg/Kg/day) to the general public (including sensitive groups) that is likely to be without an appreciable risk of deleterious effects during a life-time exposure (chronic RfD) or exposure during a limited time interval (subchronic RfD). Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) represent contaminant concentrations that EPA deems protective of public health over a lifetime (70 years) at an exposure rate of 2 liters of water per day.

Tetrachloroethene (PCE)

Exposure to PCE occurred in the past for some residents via well water through ingestion, inhalation and skin contact. Ingestion exposure to PCE did not exceed the chronic RfD of 0.01 mg/kg/day. There are no RfD or MRL values available for inhalation and skin contact exposure. Nevertheless, the total exposure that results from combining the three routes--ingestion, inhalation, and skin contact--is not likely to cause adverse health effects.

Studies of occupational workers have not linked PCE to cancer in humans. Animal studies, however, have shown that PCE will cause cancer (10). The level of exposure in these animal studies was a thousand times greater than the level in the exposed population at this site. Based on these animal studies, we estimate PCE exposure to persons through the use of private wells would result in no apparent increased risk of developing cancer.

Trichloroethylene (TCE)

Exposure to TCE has not occurred to residents via well water through ingestion, inhalation and skin contact. However, potential for exposure to this chemical can occur through future use of contaminateed ground water. Currently, there are no chronic MRL or RfD values available for this chemical. However, the level of this chemical detected in the monitoring well has exceeded EPA's MCL of 5 µg/L.

Animal studies have shown that ingesting or breathing levels of TCE that are higher than typical environmental levels can produce nervous system changes; liver and kidney damage; effects on the blood; tumors of the liver, kidney, lung and male sex organs; and possibly cancer of the tissues that form the white blood cells (leukemia). Results of a few studies in pregnant animals exposed to TCE in air on in food showed effects on unborn animals or on newborns. At present, information is not sufficient to determine whether cancer or the effects on the unborn seen in animals following exposure to TCE may also occur in humans (11).

Occupational studies of workers exposed to TCE have not detected TCE-induced cancer, while several animal studies have shown that TCE can produce lung and liver cancer (11). TCE is currently under review by EPA concerning its carcinogenicity in humans; however, people should reduce exposure to TCE as far as possible.

Vinyl Chloride

Exposure to vinyl chloride has not occurred for any residents via well water. However, potential exists for exposure to this chemical through future use of contaminated ground water, if it becomes contaminated. The concentrations of vinyl chloride detected in the ground water monitoring wells has exceeded EPA's MCL of 2 µg/L. Exposure to high levels of vinyl chloride has been associated with increased incidence of cancer of the liver as well as tumors of other sites. Studies designed to determine if the low levels of vinyl chloride measured in outside air, drinking water, or food could cause harmful effects in humans have not been performed (12). Based on the animal studies, we estimate that if residents drink contaminated ground water for a lifetime, they may have a high increased risk of developing cancer.

1,2, Dichloroethane and 1,2 Dichloroethene

The levels of these two chemicals detected in the ground water exceeds their respective EPA's MCL (1,2 dichloroethane 5 µg/L; 1,2 dichloroethene 70 µg/L). Exposure to these chemicals have not occurred. However, potential exists for exposure to these chemicals. The levels of these two chemicals detected in the ground water are not expected to cause any serious adverse health effects. However, exposure to 1,2 dichloroethane may cause cancer in humans since this chemical has shown to cause cancer in animals. From these animal studies we estimate that if residents drink contaminated ground water for a lifetime, they may have a low increased risk of developing cancer (13).

Lead

The concentrations of lead in three residential wells exceeded the Proposed Maximum Contaminant Level (PMCL) of 5 µg/L. Chronic exposure to low levels of lead via ingestion may produce toxic effects. The lead contamination appears not be site related. Currently, there are no chronic MRL or RfD available to this chemical. Results of a growing number of studies indicate that chronic exposure to low levels of lead is associated with altered neurophysiological performance and the young child is particularly vulnerable to this effect (14). Please see the Community Concerns Evaluation section for additional public health evaluation of exposure to lead.

B. Health Outcome Data Evaluation

Health outcome data were not evaluated for this site because there are no completed exposure pathways related to the site and there were no community health concerns expressed related to disease and illness around the site.

C. Community Health Concerns Evaluation

We have addressed the community concerns about health as follows:

  1. Is our health currently at risk as a result of exposure to contaminants in our residential well?

As indicated in Table III of this public health assessment, there were no VOCs detected in any residential wells tested during the RI. Therefore, VOC should not be of any concern. Lead has been found in residential wells above the PMCL of 5 µg/L, however, its presence appears to be unrelated to the site. The maximum lead contamination in a residential well was an estimated 16.6 ug/L. Although the level of lead exceeded EPA's PMCL, such exposure should not have an acute (short-term) adverse health effect. Exposure to lead should be reduced as far as possible to insure that this potential for adverse health effects from chronic lead exposure will be eliminated.


CONCLUSIONS

Based on the information reviewed, the Pennsylvania Department of Health has concluded that this site represents no apparent public health hazard. As noted in the pathway analysis section, there is no evidence of current or significant past human exposure to contaminated media. Although one residential well was contaminated with TCE above the MCL, prior to the Remedial Investigation, indicating a possible public health problem, the contaminant was not detected in subsequent sampling. This limited exposure is unlikely to cause an adverse health outcome. Future exposure to site related contaminants may occur through contact with contaminated ground water. However, limited historical data shows a steadily decreasing trend in ground water contamination.

Relatively high levels of methane were detected on site. Although no measurable levels of methane were detected at the landfill perimeter, the potential exists for methane to migrate off-site and then into nearby homes resulting in indoor residential exposures.


RECOMMENDATIONS

Cease/Reduce Exposure Recommendation

The Pennsylvania Department of Health recommends:

  1. Gas vents should be installed to reduce and control methane releases from the landfill.

  2. Monitoring of residential well water, that contained elevated levels of lead (not site-related), should be conducted to determine the suitablity of these wells as a potable water source for long-term use.

Site Characterization Recommendations

  1. Routine monitoring of ground water, downgradient to the site, should be conducted in off-site monitoring wells.

  2. Routine monitoring of nearby residential wells, downgradient to the site, should be conducted to determine if contaminated ground water migration has a future impact on these wells.

Health Activities Recommendation Panel (HARP) Recommendations

The Delta Quarries/Stotler Landfill site, Blair County, Pennsylvania, has been evaluated for appropriate follow-up with respect to health activities.

The Panel recommends the following:

  1. Community health education is needed to inform the individuals, who were exposed in the past through use of contaminated water from their private well of the health significance of their exposure. This activity will be performed by the PADOH.

  2. Because there was no evidence of human exposure to contaminants at levels of public health concern, no further activities were indicated.

PUBLIC HEALTH ACTIONS

Public Health Actions Taken:

Based on the recommendation of the HARP, PADOH has addressed recommendation number 1. Specifically, PADOH has provided written notification that it reviewed a resident's well water sampling data which was conducted prior to the Remedial Investigation and found to be slightly contaminated. PADOH discussed the potential health effects associated with past or present use of this well water. PADOH also stated that it is available for further consultation.

Public Health Actions Planned:

The EPA has indicated that they plan to take the following actions related to the recommendations in the public health assessment.

  1. EPA is planning to restrict access to the site.

  2. EPA will oversee ground water monitoring in off-site monitoring wells.

  3. As a result of its investigation, EPA intends to pump and treat the contaminated ground water beneath the Delta Quarries site.

  4. EPA is planning to install gas vents at the landfill as part of the site remediation. This action should reduce and control methane releases from the landfill.

  5. EPA will oversee the monitoring of residential wells as necessary downgradient to the site. The pump and treat activity may later indicate that monitoring is not warranted.

CERTIFICATION

This public health assessment was prepared by the Pennsylvania Department of Health under a cooperative agreement with the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). It is in accordance with approved methodology and procedures existing at the time the public health assessment was initiated.

Gregory V. Ulirsch
Technical Project Officer, SPS, RPB, DHAC


The Division of Health Assessment and Consultation (DHAC), ATSDR, has reviewed this public health assessment and concurs with its findings.

Division Director, DHAC, ATSDR


PREPARERS OF THE REPORT

Thomas Hartman
Descriptive Statistician II
Toxicology and Health Assessment Section
Division of Environmental Health
Pennsylvania Department of Health

Kandiah Sivarajah, Ph.D.
Director, Health Assessment Program
and State Toxicologist
Toxicology and Health Assessment Section
Pennsylvania Department of Health


ATSDR REGIONAL REPRESENTATIVE

Charles Walters
Public Health Advisor
Regional Representative
Office of the Assistant Administrator, ATSDR


ATSDR TECHNICAL PROJECT OFFICER

Gregory Ulirsch
Environmental Health Engineer
Division of Health Assessment and Consultation
Remedial Programs Branch, ATSDR


REFERENCES

  1. Delta Quarries and Disposal/Stotler Landfill Site, Draft Remedial Investigation, May 1990.

  2. General Population Characteristics, Pennsylvania Part 40, U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, August 1982.

  3. 1990 Municipal Population, Pennsylvania, U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, January 1991.

  4. 1986 Population and 1985 Per Capita Income Estimates: Pennsylvania U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Census, 1987.

  5. Public Schools, Elementary Enrollments, 1989-1990; Pennsylvania Department of Education, 1990.

  6. Public Schools, Secondary Enrollments, 1989-1990, High School Graduate, 1988-1989; Pennsylvania Department of Education, 1990.

  7. Directory of Pennsylvania Hospitals, State Health Data Center, Pennsylvania Department of Health, December 1990.

  8. Nursing Home Directory, State Health Data Center, Pennsylvania Department of Health, August 1989.

  9. Preliminary Health Assessment, Delta Quarries/Stotler Landfill, ATSDR, November 15, 1988.

  10. ATSDR, Draft Toxicological Profile for Tetrachloroethane, U.S. Public Health Service, Atlanta, Georgia, December 1987.

  11. ATSDR, Toxicological Profile for Trichloroethene, U.S. Public Health Service, Atlanta, Georgia, October 1989.

  12. ATSDR, Toxicological Profile for Vinyl Chloride, U.S. Public Health Service, Atlanta, Georgia, August 1989.

  13. ATSDR, Toxicological Profile for 1,2-Dichloroethane, U.S. Public Health Service, Atlanta, Georgia, December 1989.

  14. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services/Public Health Service/Centers for Disease Control. Preventing lead poisoning in young children, January 1985.

APPENDICES

Site Map
Appendix A. Site Map

Well Locations
Appendix B. Well Locations


Table of Contents

  
 
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