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PUBLIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT

NAVAL SUPPORT ACTIVITY, MECHANICSBURG
(Aliases: NAVY SHIPS PARTS CONTROL CENTER AND NAVAL INVENTORY CONTROL POINT)
MECHANICSBURG, CUMBERLAND COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA


TABLES

Table 2. Evaluation of IRP sites and AOCs at NSA Mechanicsburg

Site Site Description and History Investigation Results/Environmental Monitoring Results Corrective Action and/or Current Status Evaluation of Public Health Hazard

Installation Restoration Program (IRP) Sites

Site 1 - Carter Road Landfill The 4.5-acre Carter Road Landfill is located southwest of the intersection of Ball Road and Carter Road. The landfill was used as a disposal site for medical supplies, debris, and construction rubble from 1950-1952. Currently, the site is covered with three storage pad and with a road surface compound (primarily gravel), and is used for temporary outdoor storage. Groundwater: Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (benzene and trichloroethylene [TCE]), semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), and metals were detected at levels above comparison values (CVs).

Surface Soil: SVOCs, pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were detected in the soil, but at levels below CVs.

Site 1 was closed on September 30, 1998, when the final record of decision (ROD) was signed. The ROD requires the Navy to restrict residential use and to document the land-use restriction. Based on a review of site data and potential exposure scenarios, ERG anticipates no public health hazards. There is limited potential for public contact with contaminated soil and the groundwater beneath Site 1 is not used as a drinking water source.
Site 2 - Building 904 Landfill The building 904 landfill is approximately 1 acre of flat grassy field terrain. The site was used as a disposal site for medical supplies and construction debris during the 1950s. Currently, the site is covered with grass. Groundwater: Metals (antimony, arsenic, beryllium cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, and nickel) have been detected at concentrations above their CVs. No VOCs were detected.

Surface Soil: Metals (antimony and arsenic) were detected, but primarily at levels below CVs.

The Navy released a no further action (NFA) decision document. The Navy is addressing EPA comments on the proposed decision and working toward formal closure of the site in fiscal year 2001. Based on a review of site data and potential exposure scenarios, no public health hazards are expected. Access to the site has been restricted and the groundwater beneath Site 2 is not used as a source of drinking water.
Site 3 - Ball Road Landfill The two pits at the 7.5-acre Site 3 were created in the early 1940s to serve as a quarry for raw building materials during construction of the installation. From 1946 to 1977, the quarry pits were the installation's primary disposal area for various waste, including paints, solvents, and medical supplies. Wastes were dumped into the two pits, doused with gasoline, and burned on a weekly basis. A majority of the site is now paved. Groundwater: VOCs, SVOC, metals, and PCBs were detected at levels above CVs. The highest levels of contaminants were measured in samples collected from the perched aquifer within the burn pit area and from a bedrock well.

Surface Soil: Metals and PCBs (Aroclor 1260) were detected at levels above CVs.

A dye study was conducted to determine the direction of groundwater flow within the site. About 20,000 cubic yards of contaminated soil was excavated in 1994. A 1998 removal action resulted in the off-site disposal of 47,000 tons of contaminated soil. A final asphalt cover was added in March 1999. A ROD for soil (with land-use control remedies that prohibits residential development) was signed in September 2000. A geophysical investigation has been completed and installation of wells for groundwater monitoring is underway. Contaminants are migrating off site with the groundwater. No public drinking water wells are downgradient of the contamination, but the water is used for irrigation/ farming. Based on a review of site data and potential exposure scenarios, no public health hazards are expected.The public had limited access to Site 3 and the contaminated soil has been removed.
Site 4 - Radioactive Disposal Site The Radioactive Waste Disposal Site is located in the northwest corner of the installation. One or more burials of low-level radioactive waste allegedly occurred in the 1950s and 1960s. The site has been paved and is currently used as a storage area. Groundwater: Groundwater was not evaluated.

Surface Soil: Soil was sampled but only low levels of lead (350 parts per million [ppm]) were detected.

No buried waste or radiation were found during ground penetrating radar, excavation, or radiation surveys. In 1995, EPA concurred with the Navy's NFA decision after the EPA evaluated groundwater at Site 4 through the use of a model that simulated the subsurface release of radioactive material. The results indicated that, considering the type and amounts of material reportedly disposed at Site 4, there would be no deleterious effect to groundwater. The site was closed under the Navy's IRP in 1995. Based on a review of site data and potential exposure scenarios, no public health hazards are expected. The public has had limited access to the site and groundwater at Site 4 is not used as a drinking water source. No radiological contaminants were found.
Site 5 - Golf Course Landfill The 4.5-acre Golf Course Landfill is located in the northern portion of the installation, near the fifth fairway of the NSA golf course. Waste from the installation was disposed of at this site between 1946 and 1947. The terrain is flat with a slight west to east downslope. Ground cover is flat and regularly mowed. Groundwater: VOCs and PCBs were detected but at concentrations below CVs. Metals and certain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been detected at levels above CVs in one well.

Subsurface Soil/Fill: VOCs, PCBs, and lead were detected in subsurface soils at levels above CVs. The fill is located 1 to 5 feet below ground surface.

The Navy gathered additional groundwater data. Formal closure with NFA is expected in 2001. Based on a review of site data and potential exposures, no public health hazards are expected. Grass covering prevents direct contact with contaminated soil and no one is drinking contaminated groundwater from beneath the site.
Site 6 - Building 306 Underground Fuel Tank Leak The building 306 underground storage tanks (USTs) are located 50 feet northeast of building 306 B. Three leaking 10,000 gallon USTs were located at this site, but were removed in 1977 (one tank) and 1988 (two tanks). The area is currently paved. Groundwater: Groundwater samples were analyzed for VOCs. VOCs were detected at trace levels well below CVs. Sites 3 and 7 are the suspected sources of the VOCs.

Surface Soil: Lead was detected but at levels below CVs.

In the late 1970s, recovery operations were undertaken to extract petroleum hydrocarbons from above the water table. The leaking USTs were removed in 1977 and 1988. Groundwater was subsequently monitored to confirm that contaminant levels were decreasing due to natural attenuation. Sampling in 1991 showed no indication of petroleum hydrocarbons. The Navy recommended a NFA in 1993. EPA and the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) agreed and the site is now closed under the Navy IRP. Based on a review of site data and potential exposures, no public health hazards are expected. The area is not accessible to the general public and no one is drinking groundwater from beneath the site.
Site 7 - Buildings 403 and 404 Solvent Disposal Area The railroad bed between Buildings 403 and 404 was a disposal area for industrial solvents used to strip oils from machinery. Groundwater: TCE and SVOCs were detected at levels above CVs. Metals were also detected, but infrequently at levels above CVs. The highest metal concentrations were observed in upgradient wells.

Surface Soil:VOCs were detected, but at levels below CVs.

A dye tracer study suggests that most of the VOCs in groundwater at Site 7 can be attributed to the burn pits at Site 3. After additional assessment, the EPA, PADEP, and Navy agreed that no further action was needed and the site was closed in March 2000. Based on a review of site data and potential exposures, no public health hazards are expected. The area is not accessible for direct contact with contaminated soil and no one is drinking contaminated groundwater from beneath the site.
Site 8 - Ore Storage Area The Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) Defense National Stockpile Center (DNSC) managed stock piles of mineral ores since the 1950s within the 14-acre Site 8 in the southwest portion of NSA. Chromite and manganese ores were stored in the north and west portion of Site 8; kyanite and aluminum oxide were stored in the southeast portion of Site 8. Site 8 once contained up to 39 piles of ore. Today, this area consists of only four grass-covered piles and one additional pile staged on concrete. Groundwater: VOCs were detected but generally at levels below CVs. The metals antimony, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, and lead exceeded their CVs.

Surface Soil: Metal concentrations were typically in the range of background concentrations.

Sediment: Sediment contained a metal (manganese), PAHs, and PCBs, but generally at concentrations below CVs.

The Navy is addressing additional EPA requirements and awaiting results of the human health and ecological risk assessment, while working toward closure of the site in 2001. Currently, additional ground-water sampling planned for Site 8. Based on a review of site data and potential exposure scenarios, no public health hazards are expected. The area is not accessible and no one is drinking contaminated groundwater from beneath the site.
Site 9 - Storm Water Drainage Ditch (SWDD) The SWDD extends 1.5 miles along the western boundary of the NSA from a point north of the West Gate to Trindle Spring Run. Trindle Spring Run is a cold water fishery that flows into the Conodoguinet Creek. Although the SWDD was originally constructed to receive stormwater runoff from NSA, it now appears that the ditch also receives discharges from private, commercial, and industrial properties along its length. During low flow, stormwater is absorbed through sinkholes in the SWDD and during heavy rainfall, excess stormwater discharges to Trindle Spring Run. Groundwater: VOCs (TCE, tetrachloroethylene [PCE], and benzene), SVOCs, and PCBs (Aroclor 1260) exceeded their CVs. It is believed that the VOCs at Site 9 have migrated from Site 7 and/or Site 3. The metals antimony, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, and thallium also exceeded their CVs.

Surface Water: VOCs, PCBs, and most metals were either not detected or detected at levels below CVs. Lead, however, was above its CV for drinking water.

Soil/Sediment: PCBs and metals were detected at levels above CVs. Storm water moving through the ditch transports most of the sediment into sinkholes and a lesser portion through overland flow to Trindle Spring Run.

Remedial actions as outlined in the ROD have been implemented. In 1991, the Navy excavated sediment from the SWDD floor, upper portion, and sections outside of the fenced areas. The material was disposed off site. A gabion dam was left in place to help prevent sediment migration. The Navy completed an annual sediment monitoring program in 1997. Current work includes testing of storm water and suspended sediment in stormwater entering the SWDD, transported to sinkholes and Trindle Spring Run, and discharged to springs along Trindle Spring Run. In addition, a revised human health risk assessment for Site 9 is currently in draft form. Closure of the site is planned for 2002/2003. Based on a review of site data and potential exposure scenarios, no public health hazards are expected. Even though sediment and surface water contain contaminants at levels above CVs, no one is expected to come in contact with harmful levels of contaminants frequently or for long periods of time. Such limited exposure is not expected to lead to adverse health effects. The Navy's corrective/cleanup actions at IRP sites and along the SWDD subsequently reduce contaminant levels entering Trindle Spring Run.
Site 10 - Building 608 Underground Storage Tanks Site 10 is located south of the main warehouse areas, about 600 feet from the security fence along the southern boundary. The area was used for diesel fuel storage and as a dispensing installation. Two 20,000 gallon USTs installed in the early 1940s stored diesel fuel that was supplied to trucks at the installation. It is believed that the tanks leaked in the past, and they were subsequently filled with sand in the 1970s after all but residual diesel fuel was removed Groundwater: Samples were analyzed for organic compounds only. VOCs (TCE and vinyl chloride) and SVOCs exceeded their CVs. The VOCs detected at this site are not believed to be associated with the USTs, but probably migrated from another portion of the facility.

Soil: Surface soils were not evaluated because affected soils were removed with the USTs.

Two USTs and associated fuel-contaminated soil were removed from the site in 1992. The excavated pit was filled with clean fill. A NFA was approved and the site was closed in 1995. Based on a review of site data and potential exposure scenarios, no public health hazards are expected.
Site 11 - Ingot Storage Areas Since the 1950s, the DLA's (DNSC) has stockpiled lead ingots at four locations covering more than 3 acres on site. Zinc ingots were also stored at the largest stockpiled area along Q Street. The uncovered ingots are stored outside on top of soil. Groundwater: Samples were analyzed for metals only. The metals arsenic, cadmium, chromium, and lead exceeded their CVs.

Surface Soil: Lead and zinc were detected at levels higher than background concentrations.

Gravel blankets and curbing to control soil erosion was completed in 1997. The Defense National Stockpile Center is working to relocate all of the ingots to an indoor storage facility. Final cleanup of soil will be accomplished once the ingots are removed. The Navy recently completed a "low-flow" sampling protocol for groundwater sampling. The formal closure of the site is expected in fiscal year 2003. Based on a review of site data and potential exposure scenarios, no public health hazards are expected.The area is fenced so direct contact with soil is prevented and no one drinks water drawn from beneath the site.
Site 12 - Building 608 Areas Site 12 consists of seven areas south of the Building 608 complex. Activities began at the complex in the mid-1940s. Hazardous materials were stored and disposed of in this area. Substances included solvents, oil, sludge, lead-acid batteries, asphalt, and grit. The area is bounded to the south, east, and west by a railroad yard. Just beyond the railroad yard to the south and east is the NSA boundary and residential and commercial property. Groundwater: Only low levels of VOCs have been detected in groundwater near Building 608.

Surface Soil: Lead concentrations exceeded CVs.

The Navy, EPA, and PADEP have agreed that no further action is needed at Site 12. Formal closure of the site is expected in 2001. Based on a review of site data and potential exposure scenarios, no public health hazards are expected.
Site 13 - Former Open Pit Incinerator The former rubble stone and mortar open pit located next to Building O-A was used to burn paper and cardboard. A floor drain at the bottom of the 6-foot deep pit overflowed to a french drain or bedrock crevice. The incinerator has been backfilled and covered with soil since at least 1971. Currently, the area is covered with grass and other vegetation. Groundwater: No groundwater sampling data were available.

Surface Soil: VOCs were detected at levels below CVs. Metals were also detected, some at levels above CVs.

The Navy, EPA, and PADEP have agreed that no further action is needed at Site 13. Formal closure of the site is expected in 2001. Based on a review of site data and potential exposure scenarios, ERG anticipates no public health hazards. The area was not accessible and no one is drinking water drawn from groundwater beneath the site.
Site 14 - Water Towers 16-A, O-C, and 504-A The three water towers associated with Site 14 were built in 1943 to supply water for the base distribution system. The outside surfaces of the towers were painted using lead-based paint. Lead based paint chips reportedly fell to the ground around the towers during sandblasting activities. Groundwater: Groundwater was not evaluated at this site.

Surface Soil: Lead was detected at concentrations above CVs. Lead contamination was found 18 inches deep and 40 to 50 feet horizontally from the towers. Arsenic and PCBs were also detected at concentrations above CVs.

The towers were demolished in September 2000. More than 2,000 tons of non-hazardous soil and 350 tons of PCB-contaminated soil were removed and the area was backfilled with clean soil. Groundwater near Water Tower 504-A was identified for corrective action. A NFA decision is expected and formal closure of the site is planned for 2001. Based on a review of site data and potential exposure scenarios, no public health hazards are expected. People may have visited the area in the past. Visitors to the towers who possibly contacted or inadvertently ate lead in soil may have had an increased chance of developing health effects. In all likelihood contact with soil was limited and not of health concern. No current or future exposures exist since the water towers and contaminated soil were removed in 2000.
Site 15 - Building 704 Area Filled Sinkhole Site 15 consists of a filled sinkhole located in an open field west of Building 704. The sinkhole was used for the disposal of solvents, grain alcohol, and medical supplies from the mid-1960s to early 1970s. Groundwater: Groundwater was not evaluated at this site.

Soil: PCBs (Aroclor 1260) and PAHs were detected at levels above CVs.

Contaminated soil was excavated and disposed of off site and the sink hole was backfilled and revegetated. The Navy, EPA, and PADEP have agreed that no further action is needed at Site 12. Formal closure of the site is expected in fiscal year 2001. Based on a review of site data and potential exposure scenarios,no public health hazards are expected. The area was not accessible and no one is drinking contaminated groundwater from beneath the site.

Areas of Concern (Investigations On-going)

Area of Concern (AOC) 1-A S01M03 Groundwater This AOC pertains to benzene and TCE contamination that was detected in well S01M03. The contamination appears to be unrelated to Site 1. Groundwater: Historically TCE (up to 8 ppb) and benzene (up to 20 ppb) were detected in wells S01M03 at levels above EPA's MCL and ATSDR's CVs. Recent monitoring indicated TCE and benzene at 3 ppb, which exceeds ATSDR's CV of 0.6 ppb, but is lower than EPA's MCL of 5 ppb.

Soil: No VOCs were detected.

Results of soil vapor monitoring indicate that additional groundwater monitoring is required at this site. Based on a review of site data and potential exposure scenarios, no public health hazards are expected since groundwater beneath Site AOC 1-A is not used as a source of drinking water.
AOC 9-A
Storm Sewer System
AOC 9-A consists of the entire 38 miles of sewers beneath the installation. This AOC was created following previous investigations at several sections of storm sewer systems. Sediment: PCBs were detected at concentrations up to 440 ppm, but most often at concentrations below 5 ppm. The highest concentrations were centered around sample S9A-A01. AOC 9-A will be closed following closure of all other sites. See Site 9.
AOC 10-A
S10M04 Groundwater
AOC 10-A consists of VOCs in groundwater that are not related to either Site 10 or Site 12. Groundwater: VOCs (TCE, 1,2-DCE, and vinyl chloride) were detected in groundwater, but only vinyl chloride exceeded its EPA MCL or ATSDR CV. Additional background investigations is required at this AOC. Based on a review of site data and potential exposure scenarios, no public health hazards are expected since groundwater beneath Site AOC 10-A is not used as a source of drinking water.
AOC 16
Basewide Ecological Risk Assessment
AOC 16 is the Basewide Installation Restoration Site Ecological Risk Screening at all IR program sites to help determine whether cleanup is necessary at Sites 2, 5, 8, and 9. Soil/Sediment: PCBs and metals were detected at levels above CVs. Stormwater moving through the ditch carries sediment to Trindle Spring Run. Draft results of the risk assessment became available in August 2000. Preliminary results indicate that contaminants pose little if any risk to ecological resources at Sites 2, 5, and 8. Risk may be associated with contaminants in certain portions of Site 9. Based on a review of available data, no public health hazards are expected. Thick vegetation and fencing helps prevent harmful exposures to contaminated sediment.
AOC 17
Background Groundwater
AOC 17 refers to groundwater sampling from clean wells that is being conducted to determine naturally occurring "background" levels of metals and certain organic compounds. AOC 17 is not a area of suspected hazardous waste, but rather refers to the basewide background groundwater study. Groundwater data collected for this AOC serves to establish background groundwater concentrations. One-year quarterly monitoring has been completed and the draft report has been issued. Not applicable.
AOC 21
Building O-D Firefighting Training Tank
AOC 21 consists of a sawed- off boiler that was formerly located near Building O-D in the northwest portion of the installation. The boiler was used to burn flammable liquids during fire-fighting training. Soil: Metals and PAHs were detected at levels above ATSDR CVs and PCBs and VOCs were below CVs. An extended site investigation is to begin in fiscal year 2002. Based on a review of site data and potential exposure scenarios, no public health hazards are expected since this site is not a publicly accessible area.
AOC 38
Building 405 Former Waste Storage Area
This AOC encompasses a former waste storage area where arsenic has been detected. Soil: Soil samples were collected in the top 0-6 inches below 4- 6 inches of a gravel cover. Metals were detected at levels above ATSDR CVs. The Navy is awaiting additional arsenic sampling and the results of an assessment. Based on a review of site data and potential exposure scenarios, no public health hazards are expected since this site is not a publicly accessible area and the soil is covered with 4-6 inches of gravel.
AOCs 51 and 52
Former Central Tank Farm
Situated along the western section of the base Site 51 consists of the former Central Tank Farm, the Central Tank Farm oil separator, building 901-A Sump, and the Central Tank Farm Transfer Station. Site 52 consists of the current Central Tank Farm and Building's 306 underground storage tank. Ground staining, has been observed and the area lacks vegetation. Soil: Soil was tested for VOCs, PCBs, and PAHs. Of the analytes tested, only PAHs were detected at levels above CVs. An expanded site investigation groundwater monitoring program is planned to start sometime between October 2001and September 2002. Based on a review of site data and potential exposure scenarios, no public health hazards are expected since this site is not a publicly accessible area.

Sources: EA 1992, 1997, 1999a-d; 2001a-f; Foster Wheeler 2000; NSA 2001; Navy 2001, 2002.

Key:

CV comparison value
DLA Defense Logistics Agency
DNSC Defense National Stockpile Center
EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency
IRP Installation Restoration Program
NFA no further action
NPL National Priorities List
NSA Naval Support Activity
PADEP Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection
PAH polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons
PCE tetrachloroethylene
ppm parts per million
PCB polychlorinated biphenyl
ROD record of decision
SWDD surface water drainage ditch
SVOC semivolatile organic compound
TCE trichloroethylene
UST underground storage tank
VOC volatile organic compound


Table 3. Exposure Pathways Evaluation Table

Pathway Name Exposure Pathway Elements Comments
Source of Contamination Environmental Medium Point of Exposure Route of Exposure Potentially Exposed Population
Completed Exposure Pathway
Consumption of Local Fish
(Off-site in the reaches of Trindle Spring Run)
PCBs from the NSA stormwater drainage ditch (SWDD) and possibly other point and nonpoint sources in the watershed. Local fish populations Consumption of locally-caught fish Ingestion Local anglers who disregard the PADEP limited fish consumption advisory. Past: Fish in Trindle Spring Run have been impacted, primarily by PCBs. PCB levels in local fish may have posed a public health hazard if consumed in sufficient quantities.

Current and Future: Anglers adhering to the PADEP fish consumption advisory can best protect themselves against the harmful effects of PCBs.

Potential Exposure Pathways

Groundwater NSA, Mechanicsburg activities have affected groundwater underlying the installation with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily trichloroethylene (TCE). Other non-NSA, Mechanicsburg sources are contributing to groundwater contamination in the area. Groundwater None. Groundwater underlying NSA, Mechanicsburg has never been used as a source of domestic water, nor will it be used for potable water in the future. None None Past, Current and Future: All on- and off-site residents receive drinking water from a municipal source which meets all federal and state drinking water standards (e.g., EPA's MCL).

Groundwater underlying NSA, Mechanicsburg poses no public health hazards because there is o exposure.

Surface Soil NSA, Mechanicsburg, Site 14 water towers. Contaminants include lead and arsenic. Exposure to contaminated surface soil at other NSA IRP sites is largely prevented because the majority of the land's surface is paved, covered by buildings, fenced, and/or lies in restricted land use locations. Surface soil Site 14 surface soil around water towers Dermal contact and incidental ingestion NSA, Mechanicsburg personnel and base residents Past: People may have contacted low levels of lead and arsenic in surface soil at the Site 14 water towers. Sporadic contact with or incidental ingestion of the contaminants detected in the surface soil is not expected to have resulted in harmful effects.

Current and Future: No public health hazards are occurring or are expected to occur. The towers have been dismantled and the contaminated soil has been excavated and removed from the site.

Surface Water/ Sediment:
SWDD and Trindle Spring Run
NSA, Mechanicsburg IRP sites and possibly other nonpoint and point sources. Contaminants include primarily PCBs in sediment, but also PAHs and metals. SWDD and Trindle Spring Run sediment SWDD and Trindle Spring Run Dermal contact and incidental ingestion People trespassing into the ditch and people using the stream for fishing. Past, Current, and Future: No apparent public health hazard is expected for this pathway. The stream is not used for drinking water nor widely used for recreation and the ditch has restricted accessibility. Sporadic contact with contaminants at the levels detected in the surface water/ sediment is not expected to result in adverse health effects.


Table 4. Contaminants That Exceeded Comparison Values in Site-wide Groundwater
NSA, Mechanicsburg

Contaminant Maximum Concentration (ppb) Location Sampling Event or Year Comparison Values
Value (ppb) Source
Volatile Organic Compounds
Benzene 21 Site 1 (S01M03) SI-Round 1 0.6 CREG
Chlorobenzene 524 Site 3 (S03B08) SI-Round 1 100 MCL
Chloroform 610 D Site 3 (S03M03) SI-Round 1 6 CREG
1,2-Dichloroethene,
total
35,413 D Site 3 (S03B06) SI-Round 1 70 MCL
Methylene chloride 1,026 D Site 3 (S03B06) SI-Round 1 5 CREG/MCL
Tetrachloroethylene 400 J Site 3 (S03B06) SI-Round 3 5 MCL
Trichloroethylene 11,131 D Site 3 (S03B06) SI-Round 1 5 MCL
Vinyl chloride 2,126 D Site 3 (S03M03) SI-Round 3 0.3 CREG
Semi-volatile Organic Compounds
1,4-Dichlorobenzene 190 Site 3 (S03B08) SI-Round 3 75 MCL
bis(2-Ethylhexyl)phthalate 39 B Site 3(S03M09) RI 3 CREG
Pesticides/Polychlorinated Biphenyls
Aroclor 1260 400 Site 3 (S03B08) SI-Round 2 0.2 child C-EMEG for Aroclor 1254
Metals (total)
Antimony 257 Site 9 (DD-3) 1992 4 RMEG
Arsenic 177 Site 3 (S03B08) SI-Round 3 0.02 CREG
Barium 2,190 Site 5 (S05M06) SI-Round 1 700 child RMEG
Beryllium 88.6 Site 2 (S02M03) SI-Round 2 4 MCL
Cadmium 149 Site 2 (S02M03) SI-Round 2 2 child C-EMEG
Chromium 1,030 Site 2 SI-Round 2 30 child RMEG
(chromium VI)
Lead 27,000 Site 3 (S03B08) SI-Round 2 15 EPA action level
Mercury 3.5 Site 3 (S03M02) SI-Round 1 no value  
Manganese 160,000 Site 3 (S03B08) SI-Round 2 500 child RMEG
Nickel 944 Site 2 (S02M03) SI-Round 2 200 child RMEG
Thallium 49.8 Site 1 (S01M02) SI-Round 1 2 MCL
Vanadium 703 Site 3 (S03M04) RI 30 child I-EMEG

Sources: EA 1999c, 2001e.

Note: SI Rounds 1, 2, and 3 were conducted in January 1990, February 1990, and April 1990, respectively. RI sampling was conducted in November 1991.

Abbreviations
C-EMEG - chronic environmental media evaluation guide
CREG - cancer risk evaluation guide
I-EMEG - intermediate environmental media evaluation guide
MCL - EPA's maximum contaminant level
nd - not detected
ppb - parts per billion
RI - remedial investigation
RMEG - reference dose media evaluation guide
SI - site investigation
Data Qualifiers
B - found in blank
D - diluted
J - estimated value


Table 5. Contaminants That Exceeded Comparison Values in Surface Soil at Sites 3, 11, and 14
NSA, Mechanicsburg

Contaminant Maximum Concentration (ppm) Comparison Value
Site 3 Site 11 Site 14 Value (ppm) Source
Volatile Organic Compounds
Trichloroethylene 52 na na 0.087 RBC, residential
Vinyl chloride 74 na na 0.1 CREG
Semi-volatile Organic Compounds/Polychlorinated Biphenyls
Benzo(a)pyrene 0.420 J na na 0.1 CREG
Aroclor-1260 greater than 50 na 4.98 0.2 child C-EMEG for Aroclor 1254
Metals
Antimony 45 N na 17.1 20 child RMEG
Arsenic 35.7 na 74.8 0.5 CREG
Beryllium 0.67 na 1.7 50 child C-EMEG
Cadmium 6.9 N 18.3 7.7 10 child C-EMEG
Chromium 49.6 E 141 329 200 child-RMEG(VI)
Lead 17,800 E 20,400 5,030 400 EPA SSL

Sources: EPA 1995; EA 1997, 1999 a, b.

Abbreviations
C-EMEG -chronic environmental media evaluation guide
CREG - cancer risk evaluation guide
na - not analyzed or data not available
ppm - parts per million
RBC - EPA Region III risk-based concentration
RMEG - reference dose media evaluation guide
SSL - EPA Soil Screening Level
Data Qualifiers
E - reported value is estimated because of the presence of interference
J - estimated value
N - spiked sample recovery was not within control limits


Table 6. SVOCs and Metals That Exceeded Comparison Values in Soil/Sediment at Site 9 (SWDD)
NSA, Mechanicsburg

Contaminant Concentration (ppm) Comparison Value
Value (ppm) Source
Semi-volatile Organic Compounds
Benzo(a)pyrene 6 0.1 CREG
Aroclor-1260 greater than 100 0.32 RBC, residential
Metals
Arsenic 24.2 J 0.5 CREG

Sources: EA 1999b, 2000b.

Abbreviations
CREG - cancer risk evaluation guide
ppm- parts per million
RBC - EPA Region III risk-based concentration
Data Qualifiers
J - estimated value  


Table 7. Maximum PCB Concentrations in Sediment at Site 9 (SWDD)
NSA, Mechanicsburg

Site 9
(SWDD)
Segment
Maximum PCB concentration
(ppm) 1
Land Use Observed
Non-NSA Discharges
Access Restrictions Ditch Vegetation
Pre Cleanup
(Total PCBs)
Post Cleanup 2
Total PCBs Aroclor 1260
1 greater than 100 ppm 0.08 0.08 Limited recreation and residential No Yes, fence since 1989 Heavy until removal in 1991
2 up to 70 ppm 20.8 41.3 Industrial (trucking companies), undeveloped, and residential Yes Yes, fence since 1989 Moderate. Well-developed tree canopy on the banks and some tree growth in the channel
3 up to 35 ppm 1.0 2.8 Scattered residences No Yes, fence extended to Salem Church Road in 1991-1992 Heavy. Downstream of the Salem Church Road, the ditch is heavily vegetated by grasses only; which is mowed by the Navy semi-annually.

Source: EA 1999b EA 2000b.

1 Note that ATSDR does not have a comparison value for total PCBs or Aroclor 1260. For comparison, ATSDR uses its comparison value for Aroclor 1254 of 1 ppm for a child and 10 ppm for an adult.

2 The analytical method used for "total" PCBs in sediment actually summed the concentrations of 28 select congeners. As such, the "total" PCB concentration does not truly represent the total of all 209 congeners, rather it is the total concentration of the 28 select congeners. The "total" PCB concentration in sediment presented in this PHA, therefore, may be less than the Aroclor 1260 concentration.

Key: PCBs - polychlorinated biphenyls; ppm - parts per million; SWDD = stormwater drainage ditch.


Table 8. Maximum PCB Concentrations in Sediment of Trindle Spring Run
NSA, Mechanicsburg

Reach PCB Concentrations (ppm) 1
Total PCBs Aroclor 1260
Upstream of confluence with SWDD 0.07 0.02 J
Downstream of confluence with SWDD 0.10 0.10 J

Source: EA 2000b.

1 Note that ATSDR does not have a comparison value for total PCBs or Aroclor 1260. For comparison, ATSDR uses its comparison value for Aroclor 1254 of 1 ppm for a child and 10 ppm for an adult.

Key: J = The associated value is an estimated quantity; ppm = parts per million.


Table 9. Summary of Contaminants in Fish Fillet Composites, Trindle Spring Run
NSA, Mechanicsburg

Sample Location PCB Concentration (ppm) Composite ID Number of Individual Fish/ Composite Samples Length in Inches and (Millimeters) Lipid % of Composite Sample
1988 PADEP Sampling
Downstream of SWDD and the Route 11 Bridge 0.98 Rainbow Trout 5/1 10.3 - 13.4
(262 -340 )
3.74
1996 PADEP Sampling
Varied 0.76 Rainbow Trout 5/1 9.3 - 10.4
(236 - 263)
3.26
1999 Navy Sampling
Upstream of SWDD 1.2 Rainbow Trout 5/2 5 - 5.7
(126 - 145)
not provided
0.221 Slimy Sculpin 256/3 not measured not provided
Immediately downstream of the SWDD not provided Rainbow Trout 3/1 3.8 - 5.5
(97-139)
not provided
0.752 Slimy Sculpin 418/3 not measured not provided
Downstream, beyond the Route 11 Bridge 0.633 Rainbow Trout 27/5 4.4 - 12.8
(111-325)
not provided
1.1 Slimy Sculpin 683/3 not measured not provided

Source: EA 2000b.

Key: ppm = parts per million; PCBs = polychlorinated biphenyls.


FIGURES

Area Map
Figure 1. Area Map

Site Map
Figure 2. Site Map

ATSDR's Exposure Evaluation Process
Figure 3. ATSDR's Exposure Evaluation Process

NSA Stormwater Drainage Ditch
Figure 4. NSA Stormwater Drainage Ditch


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