Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to site content

PUBLIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT

LANGLEY AIR FORCE BASE
and
NASA LANGLEY RESEARCH CENTER
HAMPTON, YORK COUNTY, VIRGINIA


TABLES

Table 1.

EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEALTH HAZARDS: Langley AFB Sites
Site Site Description/Waste Disposal History Investigation Results/Environmental Monitoring Results Corrective Activities and/or Current Status Evaluation of Public Health Hazard
LF-01
Abandoned Landfill, end of 08/26 Runway
The landfill was reportedly used from 1940 to 1950 for the disposal of dredged material from the Back River and of general construction debris. A fire truck may have been buried in this area. 1996 Site Inspection:
Surface soil: No pesticides were detected above comparison values (CVs). Metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs. Samples were not analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) or semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs).
Groundwater: No pesticides, VOCS, or SVOCs were detected above CVs. Metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
The site is open space at the end of the runway. Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels does not pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

WP-02
Abandoned Waste Water Treatment Plant, Building 724
The treatment plant operated from 1917 to 1968 and employed biological treatment using a trickling filter. The plant was also equipped to disinfect final effluent prior to its discharge into the Back River. Apparently, the plant consisted of at least two filtration pits and dry pit beds or a settling pond. 1996 Site Inspection:
Soil: Pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
Groundwater: Pesticides, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
This is an industrial site.

During ATSDR's 1997 site visit, the Air Force stated that it will remove soil around the piping down to the water table and perform further investigations of the former drying beds.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels does not pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

SS-03
Fuel Saturated Area
An old underground fuel line that was abandoned in 1965 was identified as having pinhole leaks. The fuel-saturated area covers approximately 2 acres. 1996 Site Inspection:
Subsurface soil: No contaminants were detected above CVs. Samples were not analyzed for VOCs or SVOCs other than benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Samples were not analyzed for metals other than lead.
Groundwater: Benzene, arsenic, and lead were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
This is an industrial site.

No additional remedial activities are planned (IT, 1997).

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Contaminants were detected below CVs in soil; therefore, no health hazards exist. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

SS-04
Fuel Saturated Area, Buildings 763 and 764
The site includes 24 25,000-gallon underground storage tanks which were taken out of service in 1987. A steel fuel transfer line, which was no longer used after 1990, extends through the site. The fuel-saturated area covers approximately 4.5 acres. 1990 Site Investigation, Storm Sewers:
Elevated levels of BTEX, total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons, and lead were detected in soil. Seven of the 21 existing groundwater monitoring wells contained measurable amounts of free-floating fuel, with an estimated volume of 12,000 to 31,000 gallons. Elevated levels of BTEX and total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons were detected in groundwater.
This is an industrial site.

Tanks were cleaned and backfilled with sand-cement slurry in 1987. Fuel leaks were identified and repaired in 1988.

Free fuel was recovered. The site is the subject of an Air Force Natural Attenuation Study. Groundwater is monitored for free fuel, which will be recovered if necessary (IT, 1997).

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil is not expected to pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

LF-05
Abandoned Landfill, Shellbank Area
The landfill was used during the 1930s and 1940s for general disposal, probably for municipal-type refuse. No documentation exists, however, regarding the type of refuse materials, which may have included waste oil and solvents in drums, lead-based paints, thinners, batteries, tires, fabrics, construction debris, sanitary waste water treatment plant sludge, and fly ash from coal burning. 1996 Site Inspection:
Surface soil: Dieldrin and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs. Samples were not analyzed for VOCs or SVOCs.
Groundwater: Pesticides, methylene chloride, and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
The site is open space near a playground pavilion and tennis courts. A walking path passes through the site.

A remedial investigation is being performed.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels does not pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

OT-06
Abandoned Entomology Site and Former Waste Water Treatment Plant, Shellbank Area
Operations in the former entomology building used DDT, dieldrin, chlordane, lindane, and malathion. Starting in 1943, the treatment plant was a secondary facility that used trickling filters, disinfected final effluent, and disposed sludge on site. Operations at the site, and the building itself, were abandoned in 1968. 1997 Remedial Investigation:
Surface soil: Pesticides, PAHs, and metals were detected sporadically above CVs.
Sediment: No VOCs or pesticides were detected above CVs. PAHs and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
Surface water: No SVOCs were detected. No VOCs were detected above CVs. Pesticides and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
Groundwater: Pesticides, VOCs, SVOCs, and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
The site is currently open space. A playground was formerly located here.
Plans to build a Child Development Center at this site have been abandoned.

The site is still under investigation.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under current and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil and sediment at detected levels does not pose a health hazard. Exposure to contaminants in soil and sediment in the past are not likely to pose a health hazard. Because neither groundwater or surface water is used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

LF-07
Abandoned Landfill, Shellbank Area
The landfill was active from 1948 to 1963 for general disposal, probably for municipal-type refuse. No documentation exists, however, regarding the type of refuse materials, which may have included waste oil and solvents in drums, lead-based paints, thinners, batteries, tires, fabrics, construction debris, sanitary waste water treatment plant sludge, and fly ash from coal burning. 1996 Site Inspection:
Surface soil: Dieldrin and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs. Samples were not analyzed for VOCs or SVOCs.
Groundwater: Pesticides, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
The site is open space.

A remedial investigation is being performed.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels does not pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

WP-08
Abandoned Waste Water Treatment Plant, LTA Area
The treatment plant was operated from 1930 to 1968 and provided only primary treatment. The plant was equipped to disinfect final effluent before discharging to the Back River. A sewage lagoon was possibly operated until 1940. 1996 Site Inspection:
Subsurface soil: Dieldrin, PAHs, and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
Groundwater: Pesticides, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
The site is a fenced industrial area that has been redeveloped for use as a radar station.

A remedial investigation is being performed.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels does not pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

DP-09
Abandoned Gas Cylinder Disposal Site, LTA Area
The area was reportedly used to bury gas cylinders used during the Lighter Than Air dirigible work conducted from the 1920s to 1935. 1997 Site Summary Document:
A review of historical photographs did not show any evidence for the disposal of cylinders. During the 1993 and 1996 geophysical surveys, no significant magnetic anomalies were present. All buried cylinders found to date were either empty or filled with sand.
A portion of this site includes on-base housing.

This site is recommended for no further action.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.
LF-10
Abandoned Landfill, Golf Course
The landfill was active from 1953 to 1965 for general disposal, probably for municipal-type refuse. No documentation exists, however, regarding the type of refuse materials, which may have included waste oil and solvents in drums, lead-based paints, thinners, batteries, tires, fabrics, construction debris, sanitary waste water treatment plant sludge, and fly ash from coal burning. The area was also formerly used as a bombing practice range, probably during the 1920s. 1996 Site Inspection:
Surface soil: Metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs. No pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), VOCs, or SVOCs were detected above CVs.
Groundwater: Pesticides, VOCs, SVOCs, and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
The site has been reclaimed and is now part of a golf course.

Long term monitoring of groundwater is being considered. A remedial investigation is being performed.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels does not pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

LF-11
Abandoned Landfill, Tabbs Creek Area
The landfill was in use from 1965 to 1972, and was reportedly used for the disposal of organics, inorganics, solvents, mixed municipal wastes, construction debris, chemical wastes, and sanitary refuse. Materials such as waste oil and solvents in drums, lead-based paints, thinners, empty pesticide and herbicide containers, tires, fabrics, and sanitary waste water treatment plant sludge may also have been deposited at the site. 1996 Site Inspection:
Surface soil: No pesticides were detected above CVs. Metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs. Samples were not analyzed for VOCs or SVOCs.
Groundwater: Pesticides PCBs, VOCs, SVOCs and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
The site is wooded, overgrown open space.

A remedial investigation is being performed.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels does not pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

LF-12
Abandoned Landfill, Munitions Storage Area, Northwest Area of the Base
The landfill was used from 1972 to 1981 for the disposal of organics, inorganics, mixed municipal wastes, construction debris, and sanitary refuse. Materials such as waste oil and solvents in drums, paints, thinners, tires, and fabrics may also have been deposited at the site. 1996 Site Inspection:
Surface soil: No pesticides were detected above CVs. Metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs. Samples were not analyzed for VOCs or SVOCs.
Groundwater: No VOCs or SVOCs were detected above CVs. Pesticides and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
The site is open space and storage area, located in remote area.

A remedial investigation is being performed.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels does not pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

LF-13
Abandoned Landfill, Munitions Storage Area, Northwest Area of the Base
The site was reportedly used for about one month (date unknown) as a small landfill trench, probably for municipal-type refuse. No documentation exists, however, regarding the type of refuse materials, which may have included waste oil and solvents in drums, lead-based paints, thinners, batteries, tires, fabrics, construction debris, sanitary waste water treatment plant sludge, and fly ash from coal burning. NASA may also have deposited unknown materials at this site. 1996 Site Inspection:
Surface soil: No pesticides or VOCs were detected above CVs. SVOCs and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
Groundwater: Pesticides, VOCs, and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
The site is overgrown, wooded open space that is seldom used, except for deer hunting and training.

A remedial investigation is being performed.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels does not pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

WP-14
Abandoned Chemical Leach Pit
The site is the approximate location of an old chemical leach pit adjacent to the taxiway that was used for the collection of washdown and spills associated with loading pesticides (most notably malathion, which was used to control mosquitos) onto spray planes. The area was also used as a bombing practice range, probably during the 1920s. 1996 Site Inspection:
Surface soil: No SVOCs were detected above CVs. Dieldrin and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs. Samples were not analyzed for VOCs.
Groundwater: Pesticides, PAHs, and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
The site is open space.

A remedial investigation is being performed.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels does not pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

LF-15
Abandoned Landfill, Willoughby Point
From 1930 to 1940, the site was used for the disposal of construction debris and old vehicles, possibly including an old fire truck. 1996 Site Inspection:
Surface soil: 4,4'-DDE and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs. Samples were not analyzed for VOCs or SVOCs.
Groundwater: Alpha-BHC, benzene, and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
The site is open space. A walking path passes through the site.

A remedial investigation is being performed.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels does not pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

SS-16
Fuel Saturated Area, Dodd Boulevard and Thompson Street
Fuel was reportedly stored at the site in six underground storage tanks associated with a former gas station. Two tanks reportedly contained fuel oil; the contents of the other four are unknown. 1996 Site Inspection:
Subsurface soil: BTEX was detected below CVs. Arsenic was detected slightly and sporadically above the CV. Samples were not analyzed for VOCs or SVOCs other than BTEX.
Groundwater: Benzene and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
The site is currently paved and used as a parking lot.

The tanks have been removed.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels does not pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

LF-17
Abandoned Landfill, LTA Area
The landfill was used from 1917 to 1945, probably for municipal-type refuse. No documentation exists, however, regarding the type of refuse materials, which may have included waste oil and solvents in drums, paints, thinners, batteries, tires, fabrics, construction debris, and fly ash from coal burning. The site also includes a trash burning pit (OT-38, Area 3). 1996 Site Inspection:
Surface soil: Pesticides and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs. High concentrations of lead were detected. Samples were not analyzed for VOCs or SVOCs.
Groundwater: Pesticides, trichloroethene, and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
This is a graveled site in an industrial area. The site is presently occupied by the skeet range, which is closed. Portions of the site are considered wetlands.

A remedial investigation is being performed.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels does not pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

LF-18
Abandoned Landfill, Northwest Corner of the Base
The landfill was used in the 1930s for the disposal of wood, stumps, and construction debris. NASA may have deposited unknown materials at the site. 1996 Site Inspection:
Surface soil: No pesticides were detected above CVs. Metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs. Samples were not analyzed for VOCs or SVOCs.
Groundwater: No VOCs or SVOCs were detected above CVs. Pesticides and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
The site is an overgrown wetlands area.

A remedial investigation is being performed.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels does not pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

SS-19
Transformer Storage Area, Building 1335
Before PCB regulations were issued in 1979, transformers were stored outside the building on a gravel-covered, asphalt-based fenced area; some minor leakage was reported. Currently, out-of-service transformers are stored on a concrete pad in the building. 1996 Site Inspection:
Soil: PCB-1260 was detected slightly and sporadically above the CV.
The site is a fenced area for RV and trailer parking. Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels does not pose a health hazard.

ST-21
Fuel Saturated Area
The area immediately surrounding Building 381, the pumping station, and the fire station is fuel-saturated. The site is included in ST-26. See Site ST-26. See Site ST-26. See Site ST-26.
LF-22
Abandoned Landfill, Willoughby Point
The landfill was used during the 1930s, probably for municipal-type refuse. No documentation exists, however, regarding the type of refuse materials, which may have included waste oil and solvents in drums, lead-based paints, thinners, batteries, tires, fabrics, construction debris, and fly ash from coal burning. 1996 Site Inspection:
Surface soil: Dieldrin and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs. Samples were not analyzed for VOCs or SVOCs.
Groundwater: No VOCs or SVOCs were detected above CVs. Pesticides and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
The site is open space near an industrial area.

A remedial investigation is being performed.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels does not pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

SS-23
Former Coal Storage Area, Willoughby Point
The site was used as a major coal storage area from 1917 to the early 1960s, when coal was the primary heating fuel at Langley. Coal was unloaded from rail cars and stored inside a concrete-walled impoundment, which has since been demolished. 1997 Site Closeout Document:
Subsurface soil: PAHs and arsenic were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
Groundwater: Metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
This is an industrial site. Most of the site is covered with concrete.

The site is recommended for no further action.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels does not pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

SS-24
Abandoned Waste Oil Storage Area, Munitions Storage Area
Waste oils and solvents were collected in 55-gallon drums and then emptied into two fiberglass underground storage tanks installed in 1972. Solvents and wastes include 1,1,1-trichloroethane, methyl ethyl ketone, toluene, PD-680, zinc chromate primers, polyurethane paints, and phenolic paint strippers. Three small underground storage tanks were also used to store waste petroleum products. 1996 Site Inspection:
Surface soil: Pesticides and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs. Samples were not analyzed for VOCs or SVOCs.
Groundwater: No VOCs or SVOCs were detected above CVs. PCB-1248 and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
The site is located in a restricted access area near the munitions area, but within 5 yards of a grass-covered volleyball court and picnic area.

All solvents and oils were pumped out of the tanks in 1986. Two tanks were removed.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels does not pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

OT-25
Old Entomology Building and Abandoned Pesticide/
Herbicide Storage Area, Building 965
Entomology operations occurred from 1971 to 1983. Spills, primarily of malathion, reportedly occurred in a storage yard. Pesticide and herbicide management practices in the building and its surroundings led to contamination of building material, soil, and groundwater. In 1989, several hundred gallons of diesel fuels spilled from an aboveground storage tank. 1996 Site Inspection:
Soil: Pesticides were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs. Samples were not analyzed for VOCs, SVOCs, or metals.
Groundwater: Pesticides were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
The building has been removed and the site is currently a locked and fenced gravel area containing cans of waste. The site is next to a residential area, a playground, and tennis courts.

The Air Force plans to remediate soil.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels does not pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

ST-26
West Apron/Control Tower, Fuel Saturated Area
Fuel-saturated areas exist in the Control Tower Area (ST-21), the Hot Pits area, which runs along the jet parking area where jets are fueled and defueled, and Brown's Creek, a tidal creek that originates near the control tower and flows directly into the Back River. The Control Tower Area consists of eight underground storage tanks and a pumping station. 1990 Site Investigation, Storm Sewers:
Control Tower Area: A plume of free-floating fuel exists in the groundwater under the site. Groundwater and soil contaminant levels exceed Virginia regulatory limits and appear to conform to the area of free fuel.
Hot Pits Area: Free fuel was detected in some of the monitoring wells in the Hot Pits Area. Petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations in excess of Virginia regulatory limits were detected in soil and groundwater.
Brown's Creek Area: Sediment is contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons.
The site consists of industrial areas in the flightline area.

Control Tower Area: Free fuel was recovered in 1991 (IT, 1997).

Hot Pits Area: Free fuel was recovered in 1991. No additional activities are planned beyond groundwater monitoring for the presence of free fuel and, if necessary, recovery (IT, 1997).

Brown's Creek Area: The source of contamination has been eliminated through repair and replacement of the leaking underground storage tanks and pipeline (IT, 1997).

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil and sediment are not expected to pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

ST-27
Danforth Fuel Line Leaks, Fuel Saturated Area (JP-4 Fuel Transfer Line)
The fuel transfer line is a 6,600-foot-long pipe that carried jet fuel from the Bulk Fuel Storage Area (ST-34) to the West Parking Apron (ST-26), mostly underground. In 1987, preventive maintenance leak testing indicated several leaks. Numerous leaks have been detected and repaired. Use of the pipeline was discontinued in April 1990. 1990 Site Investigation, Storm Sewers:
Soil samples were found to be "highly contaminated" with volatile and semi-volatile constituents. Free-floating fuel was detected in several monitoring wells.
The site traverses 6,600 feet of the Base, generally along a road that goes through industrial areas.

Free fuel was recovered. Groundwater is monitored for free fuel, which will be recovered if necessary (IT, 1997).

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil is not expected to pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

ST-28
BX Service Station, Fuel Saturated Area, Building 258
The station provides gasoline for nonmilitary vehicles and is approximately 300 feet from Brown's Creek, which discharges into the Back River. In 1987, leaks in the underground storage tanks resulted in fuel bubbling up into the creek. 1990 Site Investigation, Storm Sewers:
All of the soil samples collected were "highly contaminated" with fuel constituents. Fuel was observed several times in the sediment of Brown's Creek. Floating fuel and elevated levels of BTEX were encountered in one permanent groundwater monitoring well.
This is an industrial site.

Free fuel was recovered in 1987 and 1991.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil and sediment is not expected to pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

ST-29
Abandoned Underground Storage Tanks, Building 788
Eight 25,000-gallon underground JP-4 fuel tanks were connected to the main JP-4 fuel transfer line. The tanks have been out of service for many years. 1990 Site Investigation, Storm Sewers:
Subsurface soil and groundwater samples were contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons and/or BTEX. Floating fuel was detected in one groundwater monitoring well.
This is an industrial site.

The underground storage tanks were cleaned and abandoned. Free fuel was recovered. Groundwater is monitored for free fuel, which will be recovered if necessary (IT, 1997).

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil is not expected to pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

ST-30
Engine Test Cell, Building 737 - Fuel Saturated Area
A fuel spill occurred at an engine test cell that was used to test jet engines until 1989. The site was identified in 1987 when an oil sheen that originated from a leak in the concrete containment chamber of the oil/water separator was observed on the Back River. No investigation or environmental monitoring results were identified. This is an industrial site. No data were identified.
ST-31
Underground Storage Tank, Fuel Saturated Area, Building 655
Constructed in 1949, a 50,000-gallon concrete underground fuel tank was used to store fuel oil to power steam generators. There are indications of cracks in the concrete and possible fuel leakage. 1990 Site Investigation, Storm Sewers:
- In 1990, fuel oil was identified as a contaminant in the underground fuel tank at Building 655.
- Floating fuel was detected in one monitoring well. Petroleum hydrocarbon contamination was detected in groundwater and soil samples.
This is an industrial site.

The underground storage tank was repaired and free product recovered. Groundwater is monitored for free fuel, which will be recovered if necessary (IT, 1997).

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil is not expected to pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

ST-32
Abandoned Underground Storage Tank, Building 753
A 50,000-gallon concrete fuel tank was constructed in 1949 near the JP-4 pipeline to store fuel oil used in steam generators. There are indications of cracks in the concrete and possible fuel leakage. 1990 Site Investigation, Storm Sewers:
- In 1989, large amounts of petroleum product were located in sanitary sewer lines outside building 753. In 1990, JP-4 jet fuel was identified as a contaminant in the underground fuel tank at Building 753.
- No floating fuel was detected in groundwater monitoring wells. Soil samples contained low concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination. Little or no contamination was detected in groundwater.
This is an industrial site. Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil is not expected to pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

ST-33
Abandoned Underground Storage Tank, Building 755
A 50,000-gallon concrete fuel tank was constructed in 1949 near the JP-4 line to store oil used in steam generators. There are indications of cracks in the concrete and possible fuel leakage. 1990 Site Investigation, Storm Sewers:
- In 1990, fuel oil was identified as a contaminant in the underground fuel tank at Building 755.
- Floating fuel was not encountered in any of the monitoring wells. Soil was found to be contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. Low levels of petroleum hydrocarbons were detected in only two of the four groundwater samples.
This is an industrial site.

The underground storage tank was filled with inert material and closed in 1993. Free fuel was recovered. Groundwater is monitored for free fuel, which will be recovered if necessary (IT, 1997).

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil is not expected to pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

ST-34
Large Aboveground JP-4 Tanks - Fuel Farm, Facility 707 (Bulk Fuel Storage Area)
Six large aboveground JP-4 storage tanks surrounded by an asphalt-covered earthen berm were built on concrete piers. 1990 Site Investigation, Storm Sewers:
Groundwater: No floating fuel was detected in any of the monitoring wells. Little or no dissolved fuel contamination was detected. Low levels of benzene and toluene were detected in one well in January 1990.
This is an industrial site. Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

ST-35
Abandoned Septic Tanks, Golf Course
Maintenance Building 1301
Pesticides and herbicides were reportedly disposed in a septic tank with a drain field until the 1970s. The area was also formerly used as a bombing practice range, probably during the 1920s. 1996 Site Inspection:
Soil: No pesticides were detected above CVs. Samples were not analyzed for any other contaminants.
Groundwater: Dieldrin was detected slightly and sporadically above the CV.
The site is adjacent to the golf course.

The septic tank was cleaned and filled in place.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Contaminants were detected below CVs in soil; therefore, no health hazards exist. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

OT-38
Four Waste Oil and Trash Burn Areas, Basewide
Waste oils and solvents were possibly burned in four pit areas from early 1917 to 1960.
Area A was located near the runway and used during the late 1940s. Area B was located near Buildings 1096 and 1097 and used from about 1917 to the mid-1940s.
1996 Site Inspection:
Area A:
Soil: No VOCs or SVOCs were detected above CVs. Arsenic was detected slightly and sporadically above the CV.
Groundwater: Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate and metals were detected slightly above CVs.
Area B:
Soil: No VOCs or SVOCs were
detected above CVs. Arsenic was detected slightly and sporadically above the CV. Groundwater: No VOCs or SVOCs were detected above CVs. Metals were detected slightly above CVs.
The sites are open areas in various industrial locations.

Area A: The remedial investigation has been completed; the proposed plan recommends no further action.

Area B: The remedial investigation has been completed; the proposed plan recommends no further action.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels does not pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

OT-38, cont.
Four Waste Oil and Trash Burn Areas, Basewide
Area C was located between Building 1908 and the Back River and was apparently used throughout the 1940s and 1950s. This area was also used as a burning ground for trash disposal during winter months, when landfill operations were difficult due to high water conditions (see LF-17). Area D was located within a landfill (LF-07) and used from 1955 to 1960. 1996 Site Inspection (continued):
Area C:
Soil: No PCBs were detected. PAHs and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
Groundwater: No VOCs or SVOCs were detected above CVs. Metals were detected slightly above CVs.
Area D:
Soil: PCB-1254, PAHs, and arsenic were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
Groundwater: No VOCs or SVOCs were detected above CVs. Alpha-BHC and metals were detected slightly above CVs.
Area C: The site is being investigated under Site LF-17.
Area D: The site is being investigated under Site LF-07.
See LF-07 and LF-17 above.
OT-40
Abandoned Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Training Area, Firing-in Abutment, Building 1303
Small-scale proficiency range operations for EOD training were conducted at the site using light explosives. Detonation of small explosive charges was conducted. The firing-in abutment, constructed between 1947 and 1959, was used for the sighting-in of machine guns from aircraft. The area was also formerly used as a bombing practice range, probably during the 1920s. 1997 Site Closeout Document:
Subsurface soil: No explosive compounds were detected. Arsenic was detected slightly and sporadically above the CV.
This is an industrial site located near the horse stables.

The site is recommended for no further action.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels does not pose a health hazard.

FT-41
Abandoned Fire Training Area, Firing-in Abutment, Building 1303
Fire training exercises were conducted at least quarterly and occasionally up to five times per month beginning in the early 1960s. For each exercise, approximately 300 to 500 gallons of waste fuel, JP-4, and hydraulic fluids were pour directly onto the ground, ignited, and then extinguished. The fire training waste (run-off, foaming agents, etc.) may have migrated into nearby surface waters and eventually into Tabbs Creek. The area was also formerly used as a bombing practice range, probably during the 1920s. 1996 Site Inspection:
Surface soil: Dieldrin and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs. Samples were not analyzed for VOCs or SVOCs.
Groundwater: 1,2-Dichloroethane and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
The site, located near horse stables, is an active fire-training area.

A remedial investigation is being performed.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels does not pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

WT-42
Abandoned Bethel Manor Waste Treatment Plant
The site was a secondary sewage treatment facility that used an activated sludge process and serviced Bethel Manor Housing from the late 1940s to 1968. The plant was also equipped to disinfect final effluent before discharge to surface waters. In 1992, an eight-person survey team did not find the site or any remnants of the site. The site was closed in late 1992 by Langley AFB. The Air Force is awaiting site closeout approval. Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.
ST-48
Abandoned Fuel Tanks, Abandoned Bethel Manor Service Station, Building 1795
The site was a gas station from 1964 to 1984, and includes abandoned underground fuel tanks beneath a parking lot. There may have been as many as eight tanks prior to 1983. One 1,000-gallon fuel oil tank is still in place and may still be in use. A 550-gallon waste oil tank reportedly received unknown quantities of waste chemicals, such as waste oil, paints, and thinners, prior to its removal in November 1994. 1996 Site Inspection:
Subsurface soil: BTEX was detected below CVs. Arsenic was detected slightly and sporadically above the CV. Samples were not analyzed for VOCs or SVOCs other than BTEX.
Groundwater: Benzene and lead were detected above CVs.
The site is currently a fire station and is almost entirely covered with concrete. Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels does not pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

ST-49
Abandoned Fuel Tanks, Building 351
Two out-of-service 10,000-gallon underground tanks reportedly contained heating oil and may have leaked. The tanks are still in place, but no longer in use. 1996 Site Inspection:
Soil: PAHs were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs. Samples were not analyzed for metals.
Groundwater: No VOCs or SVOCs were detected above CVs.
This is an industrial site near the flight taxiway. Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels does not pose a health hazard. Contaminants were detected below CVs in groundwater; therefore, no health hazards exist.

ST-50
Abandoned Fuel Tanks, Base Hospital, Building 257
An underground storage tank was reportedly used to store diesel fuel for the base hospital. The tank was relocated in 1973 and replaced in 1987 or 1988. Diesel fuel may have been accidentally introduced into 2 500-gallon underground storage tanks, which have since been removed. 1996 Site Inspection:
Subsurface soil: No pesticides or VOCs were detected above CVs. Arsenic was detected slightly and sporadically above the CV. Samples were not analyzed for SVOCs.
Groundwater: Acrylonitrile was detected slightly and sporadically above the CV.
This is an industrial site that is mostly covered with a concrete parking lot.

The underground storage tanks have been removed and free fuel recovered. Groundwater is monitored for free fuel, which will be recovered if necessary (IT, 1997).

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels does not pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

OT-51
Abandoned Electrical Substation, Shellbank Area, Building 82
PCB-containing electrical equipment was in service at the electrical substation, which is now abandoned. All transformers have been removed. Transformer oil spillage was identified as a likely source for PCB contamination in the storm sewers (see separate site following OT-56). 1996 Site Inspection:
Surface soil and sediment, 1993: Dieldrin and PCB-1260 were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs. Samples were not analyzed for VOCs, SVOCs, or metals.
Surface soil, 1995: Pesticides and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
This is an abandoned industrial site.

The soil will be remediated.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil and sediment at detected levels does not pose a health hazard.

SS-52
Fuel Saturated Area, Building 1301
The site consists of one above-ground storage tank, a fuel pump, and an underground storage tank used to store gasoline and provide fuel for golf carts and golf course maintenance vehicles. The area was also formerly used as a bombing practice range, probably during the 1920s. 1996 Site Inspection:
Surface soil: Pesticides and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs. Samples were not analyzed for VOCs or SVOCs.
Groundwater: VOCs and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
The site is a half-paved, half-grassed area near the golf course.

The underground storage tanks will be removed (IT, 1998).

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels does not pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

ST-53
Septic Tank - Golf Course Maintenance
The site is the same as Site ST-35. See Site ST-35. See Site ST-35. See Site ST-35.
OT-55
Civil Engineering Yard, Underground Petroleum Contamination
A ramp led from the Back River to a sea plane hangar from the 1920s to the 1950s. The area was progressively expanded by dumping fill material into the river in front of the hangar from the early 1950s to 1960. The area was used throughout that time for storing various vehicles and materials, possibly including liquid in pits. Underground petroleum contamination exists beneath the paved storage yard. 1996 Site Inspection:
Subsurface soil: BTEX was detected below CVs. Pesticides, PCBs, and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs. Samples were not analyzed for VOCs or SVOCs other than BTEX.
Groundwater: Pesticides and metals detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
The site is currently used to store vehicles and assorted construction materials.

The soil was remediated in 1992.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels does not pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

OT-56
480th RTG, Building 23 and Silver Contamination in Storm Sewers, Basewide
There is silver contamination in the storm sewers basewide and elevated levels of silver occur periodically in the storm and sanitary sewer outfalls. Outfalls 1,2,4,5, and 6 are included in this site. The site also includes the storm sewer contamination component of Site SS-03, which is being investigated and remediated as part of the work planned at Site OT-56. The silver contamination most likely resulted from various photo-processing facilities on base. 1996 Site Inspection:
Surface water, 1990-1993 (Virginia Pollution Discharge Elimination System monitoring data): Silver concentrations were detected slightly and sporadically above the CV in samples taken from Outfalls 1 and 5.
Surface soil/sediment, 1991 and 1996: Silver was detected below the CV.
Surface water, 1996: Silver was detected below the CV.
The storm sewer system is basewide and accessible only to maintenance workers. The outfalls are potentially accessible to trespassers.

A remedial investigation is being performed.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Contaminants were detected below CVs in soil and sediment; therefore no health hazards exist. Because the storm sewer system is not used for drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

Storm Sewers [Pesticide/PCB Contamination] In conjunction with the study of silver contamination in the storm sewers, the potential for pesticides or PCBs to reach the Back River through the storm sewer system was also evaluated. Possible sources for the contamination are a transformer oil spill at Building 80 (Site OT-51), the old electrical substation in Building 244, and general pesticide use. The outfall behind Building 75 drains most of the Shellbank Area to the Back River. 1992 Site Investigation:
Surface soil: Pesticides and PCBs were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
Sediment: Pesticides and PCBs were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
Surface water: No pesticides or PCBs were detected.

The 1992 site investigation concluded that the risk of contaminant transport to the Back River through the storm sewer system in the Shellbank Area appears to be negligible.

The sites are generally located in industrial sections of the Shellbank Area. The outfall behind Building 75 is potentially accessible to trespassers. Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil and sediment at detected levels does not pose a health hazard. No contaminants were detected in surface water; therefore, no health hazards exist.

SS-61
Old Civil Engineering Paint Shop, Building 615/Marina Area
The shop was in operation from the 1950s to early 1991. A fenced-in gravel area was used to store paint and solvents and as a staging area to mix paints and to clean painting equipment. There was an underground storage tank at the site that contained unleaded gasoline for fueling boats. 1996 Baseline Risk Assessment (reporting the Remedial Investigation):
Soil: PCB-1260, PAHs, and metals were detected above CVs.
Groundwater: Dieldrin, VOCs, SVOCs, and metals were detected above CVs.
This is an industrial site for the administration of the Langley Yacht Club.

The underground storage tank and surrounding soil was removed in 1993.

A remedial investigation is being performed.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels does not pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

AOC-01
Back River Sediments
During investigations at multiple sites which are located near the Back River, sediment samples were collected. A preliminary assessment/site investigation, including a sediment study, will be completed in August 1998. A study of biota sampling will be completed some time in the spring of 1998. The Back River, a tidal estuary of the Chesapeake Bay, borders Langley AFB. No data are currently available. ATSDR will review the findings of the preliminary assessment/site investigation and the biota sampling when they become available.

Table 2.

EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEALTH HAZARDS: NASA LaRC Sites
AOC-02
Dirigible Area
The site is the location of the former hydrogen generating plant (Building 1004), which was constructed in 1917 and operational until the late 1920s, when helium became the standard gas used. Spent lead ballast, which was used in conjunction with dirigible flight operations, was believed to be buried at an area north of the hydrogen generating plant. 1998 Preliminary Assessment:
Groundwater: No pesticides were detected above CVs. Metals were detected slightly above CVs.
The site is in an industrial area.

The site is being investigated under Site LF-17.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

AOC-POL Site Stained soil was encountered within an excavation along the Back River shoreline adjacent to the Mile Long Building (Building No. 720A) water recharge/discharge pipeline. 1997 Petroleum, Oil, and Lubricant Final Work Plan:
Subsurface soil: BTEX, diesel range organics, and gasoline range organics were detected.
Groundwater: BTEX, diesel range organics, and gasoline range organics were detected.
The site is located along the Back River behind an industrial area. Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil is not expected to pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

Site 1
Chemical Waste Pit (Fill Area or Pyrotechnics Area)
Solid explosives, including lead azide and various plastics, were used for on-ground, open air tests at the Pyrotechnics Area until sometime in the 1960s. In 1968, chemicals and chemical wastes in small plastic, metal, and glass containers were reportedly put in a waste pit; reactive compounds (pyrotechnic materials) may also have been deposited here. After extensive investigation, no waste pit has been identified at this site; the pit may exist within the Construction Debris Landfill (Site 2). 1993 Expanded Site Investigation:
Soil: No volatile organic compounds (VOCs) or semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) were detected above comparison values (CVs). Metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
This is a vacant, fenced site near an industrial area. Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels is not expected to be associated with adverse health effects.

Site 2
Construction Debris Landfill (Chemical/Oil Dump Site)
The site was used for disposal of construction debris beginning in the late 1960s or early 1970s. Drums containing oil, solvents, and other unidentified chemicals were temporarily stored on site in 1973, and spills or leaks may have occurred. During a field reconnaissance in 1989, debris included reinforced concrete, cement slabs, rebar, miscellaneous vehicle parts, wood, and small cans. The site is surrounded by a partial fence with a gate, drainage canals, wetlands, and Brick Kiln Creek. The site drains through outfalls into Brick Kiln Creek. The Chemical Waste Pit (Site 1) may be located here. 1995 and 1996 Remedial Investigation:
Surface soil: No VOCs were detected above CVs. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
Sediment: No PCBs or polychlorinated terphenyls (PCTs) were detected. No VOCs, SVOCs, or pesticides were detected above CVs. Metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
Surface water: No PCBs or PCTs were detected. No VOCs were detected above CVs. Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, dieldrin, and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
Groundwater: No PCBs or PCTs were detected. VOCs, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, heptachlor, and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
The site is open space near an industrial area.
The landfill was regraded in 1975.
Based on the ecological risk assessment performed during the remedial investigation, a preliminary remediation goal of 40 parts per million for total PAHs was developed to reduce the potential for migration of contaminated soil to the adjacent wetland. Retained remedial alternatives are no action, soil excavation, and soil capping (1997 Feasibility Study).
Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil and sediment at detected levels does not pose a health hazard. Because neither surface water or groundwater is used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

Site 3
Dump
(Building 1156) Site
Surface vegetation appears scraped off in a 1947 photograph, but no dumping is apparent. A dark-toned liquid appears in photographs from the 1950s and scattered materials appear in a photograph from 1963. Building 1156 was constructed over the site in 1968. 1992 Confirmatory Sampling:
Surface soil: No SVOCs or PCBs were detected. VOCs and pesticides were detected below CVs. Metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
This is an industrial site. Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels is not expected to be associated with adverse health effects.

Site 4
Open Storage Area
Since 1968, this area has been used for open storage of aircraft, trailers, trucks, tanks, construction material, and other miscellaneous items. The site is still used for storage and is surrounded by a chain link fence. 1993 Site Investigation:
No samples were taken. No discolored or stained soils were seen; no chemical waste was observed or is known to have been stored on site.
This is an industrial site surrounded by a chain link fence.

The results of the site investigation indicated that no further action was necessary but the report recommended that, prior to any change in use of the site, debris be removed and surface soil samples be taken in the areas where rocket fuel was stored.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.
Site 6
Building 1164
Building 1164 was first noted on a 1968 photograph. Transformers and drums of PCB-containing material were stored on the concrete parking area. 1988 Survey:
Soil: PCBs were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
Concrete: No PCBs were detected.

1992 Confirmatory Sampling:
Soil: No PCBs were detected.

This is an industrial site. Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels is not expected to be associated with adverse health effects.

Site 11
Building 1199
Plant Support and Vehicle Maintenance Facility
Building 1199, constructed in 1968, was used to store drums of waste oil. A widespread dark-toned staining was seen on a 1978 photograph of the area. 1993 Site Reconnaissance:
No samples were taken. Water residual was noted in the vehicle washdown area, which corresponds to the stained area observed in the photograph. No staining was observed during the site reconnaissance; there is no known history of a spill.
This is an industrial site. Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.
Site 13
Dump
(Building 1250) Site
Mounded earth near a construction site was seen on a 1953 photograph. The site has apparently been inactive since 1978. No known historical records describe past disposal practices. 1992 Confirmatory Sampling:
Surface soil: No SVOCs or PCBs were detected. VOCs and pesticides were detected below CVs. Metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.

1995 Supplemental Investigation:
Trenched soil: No PCBs were detected. VOCs, SVOCs, and pesticides were detected below CVs. Metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.

The site is an open area near an industrial site. Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels is not expected to be associated with adverse health effects. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

Site 14
Stratton Electrical Substation (Building 1233)
The site is a major electrical switchyard. An area adjacent to the pump house was used to service transformers for many years. PCB contamination resulted from small spills during transformer servicing. 1987 to 1992 Groundwater Monitoring:
Groundwater: PCBs were detected above CVs.

1996 and 1997 Remedial Investigation:
Soil: High concentrations of PCBs were detected in "hot spots." Concentrations were generally higher in surface soil than in subsurface soil.

This is an active industrial site, secured by a perimeter fence.

Three soil removal actions occurred between 1984 and 1987 but PCBs still remain in the soil.

The results of the remedial investigation indicated that soil should be further remediated to a cleanup level of 10 parts per million for PCBs.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels does not pose a health hazard. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

Site 15
Treatment Area (Former Waste Water Treatment and Chromate Treatment Facility)
The treatment facility was completed in 1947. Chromium contamination may have occurred from previous sewage and chromate treatment operations. The facility discharges to Tabbs Creek downgradient of the site. The sludge drying beds were backfilled. The site is currently used as a welding shop and sewage pumping station. 1993 Tabbs Creek Investigation:
Surface water: Total chromium was detected below CVs.
Sediment: Total chromium was detected below CVs.

1994 Sampling:
Soil: Total chromium was detected below CVs. No hexavalent chromium was detected.

This is a fenced industrial site near a playground and fitness center. Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil and sediment at detected levels is not expected to be associated with adverse health effects. Because surface water is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

Site 16
Fill Area
(Building 1256 and Combined Loads Test Systems Test Center)
The site was historically used for disposal of construction debris. A mound was identified on a 1944 photograph and filling progressed through the 1960s. Building 1256, which was removed in the 1970s, had a small hydraulic system which reportedly contained PCBs. Drums were present in 1990. 1992 Confirmatory Sampling:
Surface soil: No pesticides were detected. PCBs were detected below CVs. Samples were not analyzed for VOCs, SVOCs, or metals.

1994 Confirmatory Sampling:
Subsurface soil: VOCs and pesticides were detected below CVs. PAHs, PCBs, and metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
Groundwater: No VOCs were detected above CVs.

This is an industrial site. Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil detected levels is not expected to be associated with adverse health effects. Because surface water is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

Site 17
Area E Warehouse
The site is used to store raw products for use in day to day operational activities, including drums on pallets, rolls of electrical conduit, and miscellaneous equipment. The site is secured by a fence with a gate. The site is located close to Tabbs Creek. 1990 Site Assessment:
Surface soil: Manganese and PCBs were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs (samples were analyzed for lead, mercury, manganese, and PCBs only).
Groundwater: Mercury and PCBs were not detected. Lead and manganese were detected above CVs in the one sample analyzed (samples were analyzed for lead, mercury, manganese, and PCBs only).
This is a fenced industrial site. Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in soil at detected levels is not expected to be associated with adverse health effects. Because groundwater is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

Storm Sewer System: East Area The storm sewer system in the east area is contaminated with PCBs and PCTs from multiple sources. NASA property holdings are all downgradient from Langley AFB property holdings. The drainage area at Building 640 and 641 is isolated NASA drainage; three other contaminated drainage areas involve upgradient Air Force drainage. 1991 Field Investigation:
Sediment: PCBs were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
The site is inaccessible except to storm system workers.

NASA has remediated Buildings 640 and 641 for source control. Remediation of the portion of the storm sewer system contaminated by NASA was completed in 1997 and the Federal Facility Compliance Agreement has been closed.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in sediment at detected levels is not expected to be associated with adverse health effects.

Storm Sewer System: West Area The storm sewer system in the west area is contaminated with PCBs and PCTs from multiple sources. Sources for the contamination include Building 1247D, Building 1235, Building 1220, a leaking transformer next to Catch Basin 149, and a transformer next to Building 1195A. The storm sewer system in the west area drains to Tabbs Creek. 1991 Field Investigation:
Sediment: PCBs were detected sporadically above CVs.
Building 1247: Wipe samples inside the building contained PCBs.
The site is inaccessible except to storm sewer system workers.

Remediation of the source buildings is complete. The storm sewer system was remediated to a cleanup goal of no detectable PCBs and the Federal Facility Compliance Agreement has been closed.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in sediment at detected levels is not expected to be associated with adverse health effects.

Storm Sewer System Throughout East and West Areas See Storm Sewer System for East and West Areas. 1991 Field Investigation:
Sediment: No VOCs were detected above CVs. PAHs, PCBs, and metals were detected sporadically above CVs.
Sediment leachate: Metals were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
See Storm Sewer System for East and West Areas. Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in sediment at detected levels is not expected to be associated with adverse health effects. Because leachate is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

Tabbs Creek Tabbs Creek originates near the West Area, meanders through its wide marsh, and empties into the Northwest Branch of the Back River. PCBs and PCTs have been discharged to Tabbs Creek from the storm sewer system through Outfall 009. 1993 Remedial Investigation:
Sediment: Dieldrin, PCBs, PAHs, metals, and dioxins/furans were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
Surface water: No PCBs or PCTs were detected. Pesticides, VOCs, SVOCs, metals, and dioxins/furans were detected slightly and sporadically above CVs.
Mussel: Pesticides, Aroclor 5432, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, and metals were detected above CVs.
Turtle: No pesticides, PCBs, or metals were detected above CVs. Bis(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate was detected above CVs.
Shrimp: Pesticides, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, dioxins, furans, and arsenic were detected above CVs.
Oyster: Pesticides, Aroclor 5432, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, dioxins, furans, and metals were detected above CVs.
Crab: Pesticides, Aroclor 5432, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, dioxins, furans, and arsenic were detected above CVs.
Fish fillet: Pesticides, PCBs, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, and arsenic were detected above CVs.
Tabbs Creek is accessible where it meets the Back River.

Based on the results of the remedial investigation, a cleanup goal of 5 parts per million for total PCBs and PCTs has been recommended for sediment in Tabbs Creek. A record of decision was signed in September 1998 by the Environmental Protection Agency and NASA LaRC which calls for dredging and off-site disposal. Sediment will be dredged from 6 inches to 3 feet and will occur mostly at the head of the creek (where contamination is highest) and in hot spots.

Based on available data, no public health hazards appear to exist.

Under past, current, and proposed future use, sporadic exposure to contaminants in sediment at detected levels is not expected to be associated with adverse health effects. Because surface water is not used as drinking water, no exposures, and therefore no health hazards, exist.

Pesticides, PCBs, PCTs, dioxins, furans, and metals were detected sporadically above CVs in fish and shellfish samples. Tabbs Creek is posted for no fishing or harvesting shellfish by the state health department. Occasional ingestion of fish from the canals is not expected to be associated with adverse health effects.



Next Section          Table of Contents

  
 
USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, 4770 Buford Hwy NE, Atlanta, GA 30341
Contact CDC: 800-232-4636 / TTY: 888-232-6348

A-Z Index

  1. A
  2. B
  3. C
  4. D
  5. E
  6. F
  7. G
  8. H
  9. I
  10. J
  11. K
  12. L
  13. M
  14. N
  15. O
  16. P
  17. Q
  18. R
  19. S
  20. T
  21. U
  22. V
  23. W
  24. X
  25. Y
  26. Z
  27. #