Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to site content

PUBLIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT

NORFOLK NAVAL SHIPYARD
PORTSMOUTH, VIRGINIA


TABLES

Table 1.

Evaluation of Potential Exposure Pathways
Pathway Name Exposure Pathway Elements Time of Exposure Comments
Source of Contamination Environmental Medium Point of Exposure Route of Exposure Exposed Population
Calcium hydroxide (and other waste) in and around Southgate Annex A former NNSY acetylene gas manufacturing plant (and other waste management practices at NNSY and neighboring Atlantic Wood Industries, Inc.) Soil Near NNSY's Site 9, including a parking area in Southgate Annex and on Atlantic Wood Industries property Dermal contact, incidental ingestion NNSY and Atlantic Wood employees, visitors, and trespassers Past,
current,
future
Calcium hydroxide is corrosive and poses an acute eye and skin hazard. Before removal of the calcium hydroxide and soil it contaminated in July of 2003, fencing did not fully surround all of the waste. ATSDR was concerned that trespassers or workers might come into contact with it. During site visits, ATSDR recommended that access restrictions be improved and that the Navy ensure that people who might have access to the area be advised of the potential health effects of contact with calcium hydroxide. These recommendations were adopted. For that reason, and because no specific cases of past exposure to calcium hydroxide have been reported, past exposure to calcium hydroxide poses no apparent public health hazard. Remediation of calcium hydroxide contamination in soil and restoration of the nearby wetland was completed in fall 2003. Current and future incidental exposures to chemical contaminants still present in the area pose no apparent public health hazard.
Paradise Creek surface water and sediment NNSY operations and waste management practices, as well as off-site point and nonpoint sources of pollution Surface water and sediment Surface water and sediment within and along Paradise Creek Dermal contact, incidental ingestion Infrequent recreational users, including anyone wading or boating Past, current, future The creek is not regularly used for recreational activities. Access to the creek is somewhat limited by mud and reeds along its banks, and there is no public access to the water from NNSY. Exposures to the surface water and sediment in the creek potentially affected by site-related contamination are expected to be infrequent and incidental. Such limited exposures to the levels of contaminants detected in the surface water and sediment samples would not cause adverse health effects and pose no apparent public health hazard. Government agencies, non-profits, and other partners have been working on improving the condition of Paradise Creek, and contaminant levels would be expected to decrease over time.
Lead in soil in and near the New Gosport area The disposal of ABM at the New Gosport Landfill (Site 1) and other sources of lead in soil, such as lead-based paint on the exterior of buildings and leaded gasoline Soil Soil on site and near the site potentially affected by site-related contami-nation (e.g., near the New Gosport Landfill) Dermal contact, incidental ingestion Nearby residents (and any frequent visitors) Past, current, future ABM and soil samples collected on Navy property in the New Gosport area and on adjacent private property have contained elevated levels of lead. Detected concentrations are associated with the past disposal of ABM, but other sources can also contribute to lead in soil, including lead-based exterior paint on homes built before 1978. Navy-owned residences in the New Gosport Housing complex contained lead-based paint and were demolished in the mid-1990s. At least some of the nearby private residences were built during the time lead-based paint was used. Cumulative exposures to lead have the potential to cause adverse health effects, particularly to children. Because of the possibility of lead exposure from multiple sources and critical data gaps (including uncertainty associated with individual exposures to lead and the absence of blood lead data), a definitive conclusion about past exposure to lead cannot be drawn. Thus, past exposure to lead in soil in and near the New Gosport area poses an indeterminate public health hazard. Recent investigative and remedial actions in the New Gosport area, completed in 2001, have reduced the potential for exposure to lead in soil. Infrequent and incidental exposure to any lead remaining in soil would not, in and of itself, pose a public health concern. Current and future exposure to soil where blasting grit was removed in the New Gosport area pose no apparent public health hazard. However, concurrent exposure to lead in other media or from other sources is possible. ATSDR recommends that families in Portsmouth participate in the Navy's or VDH's childhood lead poisoning prevention program.
Former Shipyard foundry NNSY operations and waste management practices Air Air emissions from former foundry site Inhalation Nearby residents, frequent visitors Past No information characterizing foundry emissions prior to the end of World War II is available, and information about subsequent emissions is limited. No ambient air samples or stack test results were collected before the foundry closed in the late 1980s. However, ATSDR obtained historical documents that provide estimates of production levels at the foundry after World War II, as well as estimates of the quantity of particulate matter that might have been emitted by the largest furnace at the foundry. These two estimates enabled ATSDR to assess the magnitude of emissions that might have been released by the foundry since World War II. ATSDR's conservative estimate indicates that foundry emissions after the end of World War II were sufficiently low (particularly relative to other sources) that they would not have caused adverse health effects to nearby residents. The foundry is closed and is not expected to reopen, so there are not current exposures and there will not be future exposures. Vessel construction activities-and perhaps foundry emissions-were at their peak during World War II. Thus, ATSDR categorizes residents' exposures prior to the end of World War II as an indeterminate public health hazard and subsequent exposures as posing no apparent public health hazard. Because the foundry has closed, there is no current or future exposure.
Lead in soil at family housing areas within the main Shipyard and at Stanley Court Unknown; potential sources include lead-based paint and historical practices at NNSY Soil Navy residences and yards Dermal contact, incidental ingestion Nearby residents (and any frequent visitors) Past, current, future In the mid-1990s, the Navy identified damaged lead-based paint and substantially elevated levels of lead in soil at family housing areas known as Quarters A-O, Quarters P-Z (the Horseshoe Area), and Stanley Court. The maximum detected concentration of lead in soil was 25,700 ppm. Residents were informed of these findings, offered free blood lead testing, and advised of ways to reduce lead exposures. The Navy covered areas where there was lead-based paint and covered bare soil with mulch. Most family housing units have been left vacant, demolished, or closed for renovations. Residents of occupied units received brochures with information about lead hazards and ways to reduce exposures. The Navy does not maintain records from which the blood lead levels measured in children living in NNSY housing areas can be identified. The data set comes from Portsmouth Naval Hospital, which serves Navy families from multiple installations. No information is available about where tested children lived beyond whether they lived on site at an area naval installation or off site. Also, data from some years are incomplete. In 1996, 12 of 59 samples from children living on site at one of the area Navy facilities showed blood lead levels greater than 10 µg/dL. Only one child living in off-site housing and tested in 1996 had an elevated blood lead level. After 1996, the elevated rates declined to 5% or fewer samples from children living both on site and off site. This downward trend is encouraging, but may not apply to children who lived at NNSY. No elevated levels for children living on-site were reported from 1998 to mid-2000.

Because of remediation efforts and the apparent decline in the number of children with elevated blood levels, ATSDR believes that the potential for lead exposure in NNSY quarters has been eliminated or reduced. Because some quarters and other areas may continue to be affected by lead in paint or soil, further blood-lead screening and follow-up is required. Because of past exposure potential and elevated blood lead levels measured, ATSDR places past exposure in the category of a public health hazard. The Navy has taken measures to mitigate lead exposures, including repairing or removing buildings and educating residents. However, because of continuing potential for exposure, ATSDR categorizes current and future exposures as indeterminate.

Abbreviations:
ABM abrasive blast material
ATSDR Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry
NNSY Norfolk Naval Shipyard
ppm parts per million
µg/dL micrograms per deciliter


Table 2.

Grouping of Sites Into Operable Units
Operable Unit (OU) Site Number Site Name
OU 1 Site 2 Scott Center Landfill
OU 2 Site 3
Site 4
Site 5
Site 6
Site 7
Solid Waste Management Unit 22
Sanitary Landfill
Chemical Disposal Pits
Oil Reclamation Area
East Dump
Bermed Disposal Area
Old Incinerator
OU 3 Site 9 Calcium Hydroxide Disposal Area
OU 4 Site 17 Building 195 and Vicinity

Abbreviation:
OU operable unit


Table 3.

Sampling Events for Lead in the New Gosport Area
Sampling Year Sampling location(s) Sample Type Minimum Detected (ppm) Maximum Detected (ppm) Location of Maximum Mean (ppm) Frequency of Detections Above 400 ppm (EPA's Lead Screening Level) Sampling Event
Samples Collected Within Site 1
1982 Site 1: Behind a home on Stack Street and behind a home on Wainwright Drive ABMa 560 1,730 Behind the home on Stack Street 1,145 2/2 Initial assessment study
1999 Site 1: At bare spots where ABM was exposed ABM <400 929 Not available Not availableb 2/3 Preliminary sampling conducted during spring 1999 site visit
2000 Site 1: In areas where exposure might be most likely to occurc ABM 176 1,260 Near the Stack Street cul-de-sac 599 4/5 Site investigation
2000 Site 1: Subsurface soil immediately beneath ABM Subsurface soil 0.67 350 Area C 80 0/7 Site investigation
2001 Site 1: Area A, beneath the layer of soil and ABM initially removed Soil below excavated wasted 2.5 2,940e
2,260e
Composite sample
Grab sample
124 3/83e Confirmation sampling conducted after the Site 1 removal action
2001 Site 1: Area A, locations where further excavation had occurred because lead levels in previous samples had exceeded 400 ppm Soil below excavated wasted 23 290
130
Composite sample
Grab sample
131 0/4 Resampling conducted as part of confirmation sampling
2001 Site 1: Area B, beneath the layer of soil and ABM initially removed Soil below excavated wasted 1.9 393 Grab sample 65 0/18 Post-remediation confirmation sampling
2001 Site 1: Area C, beneath the layer of soil and ABM initially removed Soil below excavated wasted 1.9 1,480e Grab sample 156 5/42e Post-remediation confirmation sampling
2001 Site 1: Area C, locations where further excavation had occurred because lead levels in previous samples had exceeded 400 ppm Soil below excavated wasted 2 11
4.8
Composite sample
Grab sample
5.1 0/5 Resampling conducted as part of confirmation sampling
Samples Collected From the New Gosport Area, Outside of Site 1
2000 Background locations in the New Gosport area, outside of Site 1f Subsurface soil 1.3 4.7 Just north of Alabama Avenue 3.2 0/8 Site investigation
2000 Just outside the perimeter of Site 1 Subsurface soil 1.4 9 Area C 2.8 0/6 Site investigation
2000 Background locations in the New Gosport area, outside of Site 1f Surface soil 9 76 Just east of Stack Street and north of Alabama Avenue 37 370/8 Site investigation
2000 Just outside the perimeter of Site 1 Surface soil 5.4 315 Area C, just east of the former drainage ditch 52 0/12 Site investigation
Samples Collected From the Paradise Creek Wetlands
2000 North of Site 1: Along the banks of Paradise Creek Wetland soil 261 358 Northeast of Area B 290 0/7 Site investigation
2000 North of Site 1: Upstream reference samples Wetland soil 82 207 Not applicableg 132 0/3 Site investigation
2000 North of Site 1: Downstream reference samples Wetland soil 233 408 Not applicableh 330 1/3 Site investigation
Soil Samples Collected in the New Gosport Housing Complex
1994 Foundations, walkways, paths, and roadside locations outside 12 Navy-owned residences in the New Gosport area Surface soil in areas that might be affected by lead-based paint 12 795 A sample from a walkway 254 5/33 Lead management plan for the New Gosport Housing complex
1994 Background samples collected outside 12 Navy-owned residences in the New Gosport area Surface soil in areas that might be affected by lead-based paint 116 390 Not applicable 228 0/5 Lead management plan for New Gosport Housing complex

Sources: CH2M HILL 2000a; Navy Public Works Center 1996a, 1996b; NNSY 1999; OHM 2001; Water and Air Research 1983.

Figure 12 depicts Site 1 (including areas A, B, and C) and vicinity.

Notes:

a The method used to evaluate the concentrations of lead in these samples is unclear.
b The detected concentrations of lead from this round of sampling were reported as 793, 929, and <400 ppm.
c Two samples were collected north of the youth center, two samples were collected near the Stack Street cul-de-sac, and one sample was collected adjacent to Paradise Creek wetlands near a crude tree fort, which was suggestive of a play area used by children.
d A mix of composite samples and grab samples were collected.
e The Navy conducted further excavation at locations where lead levels exceeded 400 ppm and then resampled these locations.
f Background sampling locations were selected randomly.
g All three upstream sampling locations were approximately 400 feet upstream of Area C.
h All three downstream sampling locations were approximately 50 feet downstream of Area C.
i The 12 residences sampled represented approximately 5% of all 247 Navy-owned housing units in the New Gosport area. The residences sampled were on Alabama Avenue and Rowan Avenue (1 residence each), Blue Street and Osprey Street (2 residences each), and Morningside Drive (6 residences). No information is available about how the Navy selected the 12 residences at which sampling occurred.

Definitions:
< less than
ABM abrasive blast material (blasting grit commingled with paint chips)
EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
composite sample a sample composed of individual grab samples that have been combined and mixed before analysis
grab sample a sample selected from a particular location
ppm parts per million


Table 4.

Potential for Exposure to Lead From Lead-Based Paint in Housing Units and Abrasive Blast Material (ABM)
Date Potential Persons Affected Potential for Exposure
1942 to 1969 (before ABM disposal occurred) Residents of the New Gosport Housing (NGH) complex and persons living in private residences in or near the New Gosport area Potential for exposure to lead-based paint in Navy-owned or private housing units
1969 to mid-1990s (when Navy families moved out of the NGH complex) Residents of the NGH complex Potential for exposure to ABM and to lead-based paint in housing units
1969 to 1999 Persons living in private residences in or near the New Gosport area Potential for exposure to ABM, any lead-based paint in housing units, and any other soil contamination associated with ABM or paint
1999 to 2001 Persons living in private residences in or near the New Gosport area No potential for exposure to ABM at Site 1, but potential for exposure to any lead-based paint in housing units and any other soil contamination associated with ABM or paint in unfenced areas
2001 to future years (if no other measures are taken to prevent potential exposures) Persons living in private residences in or near the New Gosport area Potential for exposure to any lead-based paint in housing units; low potential for exposure to any traces of grit associated with the demolished housing units or Site 1 in unfenced areas

Abbreviations:
ABM abrasive blast material
NGH New Gosport Housing


Table 5.

Lead Concentrations in Surface Soil and Potential Increases in Blood Lead Levels
Lead Concentration Predicted Rise in Blood Lead Levels, Assuming Regular Exposure*
1,730 ppm (maximum detected concentration in ABM at Site 1 in a sample collected before remediation) 5 to 12 µg/dL
740 ppm (approximate average concentration in ABM samples prior to Site 1 remediation) 2 to 5 µg/dL
408 ppm (maximum detected concentration in soil outside of Site 1) 1 to 3 µg/dL

Abbreviations
ppm parts per million
µg/dL micrograms per deciliter

* Note:

These figures represent estimated ranges and should not be interpreted as exact calculations. Please refer to the text introducing this table in the main body of the PHA for further discussion of the figures shown in this table.


Table 6.

Lead Management Actions Taken by Norfolk Naval Shipyard
Date Location Actions
October 1997 Residents of housing units inside of NNSY (Quarters A-O and P-Z) NNSY Shipyard Commander was briefed on the conditions identified at the housing units located inside of the shipyard.
November 1997 Residents of housing units inside of NNSY (Quarters A-O and P-Z)
  • All residents living in those homes were invited to a town meeting held to discuss the findings. The meeting was held at NNSY Building 1500.
  • Residents were informed of the conditions found in both housing units and soils, and advised of simple housekeeping measures to control exposure, and directed not to plant gardens.
  • A Naval medical doctor attended the meeting to respond to residents' medical questions. All residents were offered voluntary free blood lead testing, but no one in attendance expressed a desire to have the test.
December 1997 Units P- Z (The Horseshoe Area), located off of George Washington Highway and Effingham Street, on the western side of the main Shipyard. While these units remained occupied, their exteriors were covered with vinyl siding, interior areas of damaged paint were repainted, and bare spots on the lawns were covered with mulch.

Summary of samples from the Horseshoe Area lead management plan:

--Sampling was conducted outside of four of eleven residences. For each residence, a "roadside" sample was collected. Background samples were also collected.

Six (6) of 14 samples contained lead levels above 400 ppm, including:

--one background sample with a lead concentration of 2,100 ppm,
--one roadside sample where the concentration was 980 ppm,
--foundation samples with concentrations of 3,700 ppm and 555 ppm,
--other sampling results exceeding 400 ppm had lead levels below 500 ppm.

June 2001 Units P- Z (The Horseshoe Area), located off of George Washington Highway and Effingham Street, on the western side of the main Shipyard. As residents transferred out of the units, the units were left vacant and subsequently demolished. The 11 units in this area have now been demolished and converted to parking areas.
1997 and 1998 Quarters A-O Housing, located in the northeastern part of the main Shipyard (some are north of Slip 1 and others are east of Slip 2). These quarters include those with sequential designations from A to O (except Quarters F and J, which are no longer used for housing), as well as units called Quarters 210A and 210B. While these units remained occupied, their exteriors were covered with vinyl siding, interior areas of damaged paint were repainted, and bare spots on the lawns were covered with mulch.

Summary of samples from the Quarters A-O Housing lead management plan:

--Soil samples were collected outside of 14 residences and at locations expected to represent background conditions.
--Levels of lead in soil exceeded 400 ppm in samples collected adjacent to each of the residences, as well as in background samples
--Of the 35 samples analyzed, 29 contained concentrations of lead exceeding the 400 ppm action level and 21 contained concentrations of lead exceeding 1,200 ppm.
--The maximum detected concentration of lead outside three residences was 5,794 ppm, 10,812 ppm, and 25,700 ppm, respectively.

November 1998 Quarters O, 210A, and 210B Quarter O, 210A and 210B were vacated and later demolished.
November 1998 Quarters A, B, C, D, E, G, H, I, K, L, N, and M-1 Actions taken for these units are discussed above. Most units were left vacant as residents retired or received new duty assignments. The status of individual units is as follows:

--Quarters L and N are vacant, waiting to be demolished.
--Quarters M-1 is unoccupied, but may be of historic significance, so its status has yet not been determined.
--Quarters D, E, G, and H remain unoccupied but cannot be demolished due to their historic significance.
--Quarters A, B, C, I and K remain occupied. Personnel moving into these homes are notified of the conditions and any restrictions, and are provided an EPA/HUD brochure discussing lead hazards and homeowner control measures.

March 2003 Stanley Court, located outside of the Shipyard. Stanley Court (125 enlisted units) was inspected. Only one housing unit was found to contain lead paint on the interior, but lead paint was found on the exterior of all units.

Plans call for all exposed wooden trim to be covered with vinyl siding, with the exception of the exterior porch railings. A "whole house" remediation project is ongoing at this time. Units are currently unoccupied.

Summary of samples from the Stanley Court lead management plan:

--Samples taken from outside of 7 residences; no "roadside" samples; several background samples.
--One residence where the background lead level was 150 ppm had three other samples ranging from 740 ppm to 2,970 ppm.
--At another residence, one foundation sample contained 1,100 ppm lead.
--All other levels measured in samples were below 400 ppm.

Source: John Morello, Deputy Director of PWC Housing, Norfolk Naval Shipyard, June 24, 2003

Abbreviations: EPA = U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; HUD = U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; ppm = parts per million


Samples from "low-risk" children*

Table 7.

Blood Lead Data from Navy Children Tested at Portsmouth Naval Hospital, 4th Quarter 1993 to 2nd Quarter 2000
Blood lead levels (µg/dL) on base off base
<10 10- 19 20- 44 45- 69 >70 Yearly Total <10 10- 19 20- 44 45- 69 >70 Yearly Total
4th quarter 1993 4 0 0 0 0 4 35 2 0 0 0 37
1st quarter 1994 3 0 0 0 0 3 48 0 0 0 0 48
1995 (all four quarters) 10 0 0 0 0 10 170 0 0 0 0 170
1996 (all four quarters) 9 0 0 0 0 9 58 0 0 0 0 58
1997 (1st & 4th quarters) 1 0 0 0 0 1 7 0 0 0 0 7
1998 (all four quarters) 3 0 0 0 0 3 61 0 0 0 0 61
1999 (1st and **? quarters) 6 0 0 0 0 6 31 0 0 0 0 31
2000 (1st and 2nd quarters) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals for low-risk children 36 0 0 0 0 36 410 2 0 0 0 412
Total low-risk children tested 36           412          
Percentages, for low-risk kids 100% 0% 0% 0% 0%   99.5% 0.5% 0% 0% 0%  

Samples from "high risk" children*
Blood lead levels (µg/dL) on base off base
<10 10- 19 20- 44 45- 69 >70 Yearly Total <10 10- 19 20- 44 45- 69 >70 Yearly Total
4th quarter 1993 2 0 0 0 0 2 9 2 2 1 0 14
1st quarter 1994 5 1 0 0 0 6 41 1 0 0 0 42
1995 (all four quarters) 8 0 0 0 0 8 112 4 1 0 0 117
1996 (all four quarters) 38 10 2 0 0 50 461 1 0 0 0 462
1997 (1st & 4th quarters) 17 1 0 0 0 18 177 6 1 0 0 184
1998 (all four quarters) 4 0 0 0 0 4 45 1 1 0 0 47
1999 (1st and **? quarters) 27 0 0 0 0 27 204 3 0 0 0 207
2000 (1st and 2nd quarters) 7 0 0 0 0 7 56 1 0 0 0 57
Totals for high-risk children 108 12 2 0 0 122 1105 19 5 1 0 1130
Total high-risk children tested 122           1130          
Percentages, for high-risk kids 88.5% 9.8% 1.6% 0% 0%   97.8% 1.7% 0.4% 0.1% 0%  

Samples from all children (the sum of "high risk" and "low risk" samples)*
Blood lead levels (µg/dL) on base off base
<10 10- 19 20- 44 45- 69 >70 Yearly Total <10 10-19 20- 44 45- 69 >70 Yearly Total
4th quarter 1993 6 0 0 0 0 6 44 4 2 1 0 51
1st quarter 1994 8 1 0 0 0 9 89 1 0 0 0 90
1995 (all four quarters) 18 0 0 0 0 18 282 4 1 0 0 287
1996 (all four quarters) 47 10 2 0 0 59 519 1 0 0 0 520
1997 (1st & 4th quarters) 18 1 0 0 0 19 184 6 1 0 0 191
1998 (all four quarters) 7 0 0 0 0 7 106 1 1 0 0 108
1999 (1st and **? quarters) 33 0 0 0 0 33 235 3 0 0 0 238
2000 (1st and 2nd quarters) 7 0 0 0 0 7 56 1 0 0 0 57
Totals for all children 144 12 2 0 0 158 1515 21 5 1 0 1542
Total children tested 158           1542          
Percentages, for all children 91.1% 7.6% 1.3% 0% 0%   98.2% 1.4% 0.3% 0.1% 0%  

Notes: * - Data are sorted on the basis of how families responded to questions on a questionnaire about whether the children frequented areas where they might be exposed to lead. If any of the questions are answered affirmatively, indicating that the child may be exposed to lead in their environment, the children are designated at "high risk." When none of the questions are answered affirmatively, children are placed in the "low risk" group.
** - For 1999 data, samples from two quarters were received, but one of the quarters was not labeled.
Observations: Most of the detections of 10 or more µg/dL (12 of 14) were detected in 1996 in "high-risk" children living on base.
Twelve detections of 10 or more µg/dL were from a pool of 50 "high-risk" children living on base in 1996. 12 elevated levels of 50 "high-risk" kids = 24%.
That same year, blood lead levels in 9 "low-risk" children living in on-base housing were also analyzed, and none were 10 or more µg/dL.
The total number of blood lead samples analyzed in 1996 from children living on base was therefore 59. 12 elevated levels of 59 (on base samples from 1996) = 20%.
Abbreviation: g/dL = micrograms per deciliter
Source: NEHC 2003


FIGURES

Location Map
Figure 1. Location Map

Area Map
Figure 2. Area Map

Aerial Photo Map
Figure 3. Aerial Photo Map

Demographic Statistics
Figure 4. Demographic Statistics

Topographic Elevation Map
Figure 5. Topographic Elevation Map

Soil Map
Figure 6. Soil Map

Flood Plain Map
Figure 7. Flood Plain Map

Wetlands Map
Figure 8. Wetlands Map

ATSDR Evaluation Process
Figure 9. ATSDR Evaluation Process

Norfolk Naval Shipyard and Installation Restoration Program Sites Near Paradise Creek
Figure 10. Norfolk Naval Shipyard and Installation Restoration Program Sites Near Paradise Creek

Paradise Creek Disposal Area and Vicinity
Figure 11. Paradise Creek Disposal Area and Vicinity

Site 1, New Gosport Landfill: Areas A, B and C
Figure 12. Site 1, New Gosport Landfill: Areas A, B and C

Zip Codes Near Norfolk Naval Shipyard
Figure 13. Zip Codes Near Norfolk Naval Shipyard


Next Section     Table of Contents

  
 
USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, 4770 Buford Hwy NE, Atlanta, GA 30341
Contact CDC: 800-232-4636 / TTY: 888-232-6348

A-Z Index

  1. A
  2. B
  3. C
  4. D
  5. E
  6. F
  7. G
  8. H
  9. I
  10. J
  11. K
  12. L
  13. M
  14. N
  15. O
  16. P
  17. Q
  18. R
  19. S
  20. T
  21. U
  22. V
  23. W
  24. X
  25. Y
  26. Z
  27. #