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PUBLIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT

BYRON JOHNSON SALVAGE YARD
BYRON, OGLE COUNTY, ILLINOIS


TABLES



Table 1.

Salvage Yard Soil Contamination Remaining after Illinois EPA Phase I Cleanup.
Chemical Maximum
Concentration
(ppm)
Comparison Value
ppm source
INORGANICS
Antimony 25.0 0.8 RMEG
Chromium 113 (III)2000 (VI)10 RMEG1
Copper 805 None
Iron 107,000 None
Lead 485 None Carcinogen
Magnesium 26,683 None
Mercury 1.7 60 RMEG1
Nickel 565 40 RMEG1
Zinc 27,729 600 RMEG1
Total Cyanide 133 40 RMEG1,2
ORGANICS
Toluene 7.9 400 RMEG1
Xylenes 13 4,000 RMEG1

ppm = parts per million
1 = pica child
2 = RMEG for free cyanide




Table 2.

Maximum Soil Contamination at Dirk's Farm.
Chemical Disposal Area (ppm) Comparison Value
West East North ppm Source
ORGANICS
Tetrachloroethylene 0.430 ND ND .04 CREG
Toluene 960 0.026 ND 40 EMEG1
Xylenes 280 ND ND 40 EMEG1
INORGANICS
Chromium 2,390 ND ND 10* RMEG1
Copper 2,820 ND 200 None
Lead 116 ND 77.0 None Carcinogen
Nickel ND ND 54.1 40 RMEG1
Zinc 403 347.0 3,460 600 RMEG1
Total Cyanide 835 15.0 1.0 40** RMEG1

ppm = parts per million
1 = pica child
* = Chromium VI RMEG
** = Free cyanide RMEG
ND = Not Detected above background concentrations




Table 3.

Maximum Surface Drainageway Contamination
Chemical Sediment (ppm) Comparison
Value
Water (ppb) Comparison
Value
Salvage
Yard
Dirk's
Farm
ppm Source Meyers
Spring
ppb Source
Trichloroethylene
ND
ND
None
52
3
CREG
Copper
ND
27.0
None
ND
650
ILGWS
Zinc
ND
878
600
RMEG1
ND
2,000
LTHA
Total Cyanide
6.8
268
40*
RMEG
33
200*
LTHA

ppb = parts per billion * = Free Cyanide LTHA or RMEG
ppm = parts per million 1 = Pica child
ND = Not Detected




Table 4.

Completed Exposure Pathways
Pathway Name: Source Medium Exposure Point Exposure Route Receptor Population Time of Exposure Exposure Activities Estimated Number Exposed Chemicals (identify by name or reference to table in document
Area Wells Salvage Yard & Dirk's Farm Ground-water Residential
Wells
Ingestion
Inhalation
Dermal
Area Residents Past
Present
Future
Using contaminated household water. 500 Table 7
Surface
Water
Runoff
Salvage Yard & Dirk's Farm Surface Water Meyers Spring Ingestion
Inhalation
Dermal
Recreational Enthusiasts Past
Present
Future
Swimming
Water sports
100 TCE
cyanide




Table 5.

Potential Exposure Pathways
Pathway Name: Source Medium Exposure Point Exposure Route Receptor Population Time of Exposure Exposure Activities Estimated Number Exposed Chemicals (identify by name or reference to table in document
Surface Soil and Sediment Salvage Yard & Dirk's Farm Soil and Sediment Salvage Yard,
Dirk's Farm,
waterways,
motorsport park,
Ingestion
Inhalation
Dermal
Trespassers,
Hunters,
Area Residents
Past
Future
Contacting contaminated soil and sediments 100 Tables 2 & 3
Ambient Air Salvage Yard & Dirk's Farm Air On or near the site Inhalation Area Residents Past Breathing 100 Tables 2 & 3
Consumable Biota Salvage Yard & Dirk's Farm Biota On or near the site Ingestion Hunters,
Fishers
Past
Present
Future
Eating contaminated biota 100 Tables 2 & 3




Table 6.

Maximum Aquifer Contamination in micrograms per liter (µg/L)
Chemical Salvage Yard Dirk's Farm Comparison Value
Galena-Platteville St. Peter Galena-Platteville µg/L Source
ORGANICS
Acetone ND ND 61,000 1,000 RMEG1
Benzene 5 ND 53 1 CREG
2-Butanone 170 ND 5,700 6,000 RMEG1
Carbon Tetrachloride 91 ND NA 0.3 CREG
Chloroform ND ND 11 100 EMEG1
1,1-Dichloroethane 8 ND 35 None Carcinogen
1,1-Dichloroethylene 190 3 ND 90 EMEG1
1,2-Dichloroethane 6 6 6 0.4 CREG
1,2-Dichloroethylene 1,900 20 11 70 LTHA*
trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene 750 20 25 200 RMEG1
Ethyl Benzene 31 ND 590 1,000 RMEG1
4-methyl-2-pentanone ND ND 9,900 None
Tetrachloroethylene 170 10 28 0.7 CREG
Toluene 130 ND 46,000 2,000 RMEG1
1,1,1-Trichloroethane ND ND 270 200 MCL
Trichloroethylene 2,100 550 300 3 CREG
Vinyl Chloride 340 ND 120 0.2 EMEG1
Xylene 120 ND 2,400 20,000 RMEG1
INORGANICS
Arsenic 170 ND 47 3 EMEG1
Cadmium 45 ND 62 7 EMEG1
Chromium 126 92 500 100** LTHA
Lead 280 49 11,200 15 MCL2
Nickel 109 86 790 100 LTHA
Zinc 1,090 1,460 11,990 3,000 RMEG1
Total Cyanide 1,532 20 18 200 RMEG1
* LTHA for cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene 1 = Child 2 = USEPA Action Level
µg/L = micrograms per liter ** = Chromium VI ND = Not Detected




Table 7.

Contaminants of Interest in Groundwater
Chemical Maximum Aquifer Concentration
(µg/L)
Arsenic 170
Cadmium 45
Chromium 126
Cyanide (total) 1,532
Lead 280
1,1-Dichloroethylene 190
1,2-Dichloroethylene 1,900
Tetrachloroethylene 70
Toluene 46,000
Trichloroethylene 2,100
Trans-1,2-dichloroethylene 750
Vinyl Chloride 340

µg/L = micrograms of contaminant per liter of water


ATTACHMENTS


Attachment 1. Site Location



Attachment 2

Comparison Values Used In Screening Contaminants For Further Evaluation

Environmental Media Evaluation Guides (EMEGs) are developed for chemicals based on theirtoxicity, frequency of occurrence at National Priority List (NPL) sites, and potential for humanexposure. They are derived to protect the most sensitive populations and are not action levels, butrather comparison values. They do not consider carcinogenic effects, chemical interactions,multiple route exposure, or other media-specific routes of exposure, and are very conservativeconcentration values designed to protect sensitive members of the population.

Reference Dose Media Evaluation Guides (RMEGs) are another type of comparison valuederived to protect the most sensitive populations. They do not consider carcinogenic effects,chemical interactions, multiple route exposure, or other media-specific routes of exposure, andare very conservative concentration values designed to protect sensitive members of thepopulation.

Cancer Risk Evaluation Guides (CREGs) are estimated contaminant concentrations based on aprobability of one excess cancer in a million persons exposed to a chemical over a lifetime.These are also very conservative values designed to protect sensitive members of the population.

Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) have been established by USEPA for public watersupplies to reduce the chances of adverse health effects from contaminated drinking water. Thesestandards are well below levels for which health effects have been observed and take intoaccount the financial feasibility of achieving specific contaminant levels. These are enforceablelimits that public water supplies must meet.

Lifetime Health Advisories for drinking water (LTHAs) have been established by USEPA fordrinking water and are the concentration of a chemical in drinking water that is not expected tocause any adverse non-carcinogenic effects over a lifetime of exposure. These are conservativevalues that incorporate a margin of safety.


Attachment 3. General Areas of Waste Disposal and Soil Sampling at Dirk's Farm


Attachment 4. Approximate Areas of Groundwater Contamination Plumes


Table of Contents

  
 
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