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PUBLIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT

H.O.D. LANDFILL
ANTIOCH, LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS


APPENDIX A

Sequoit Industrial Park Facilities

A. Sequoit Industrial Park Facilities

1. Key Home Products/Quaker Industries/Cunningham Dump/Quaker Dump

The eastern area of the Sequoit Acres Industrial Park, located west of H.O.D. landfill is low-lying and was reportedlyfilled with refuse. Landfilling of unidentified wastes began around 1959, south of McMillen Road in the formerCunningham Dump, located in the current Quaker Industries Parking Lot. The Cunningham Dump closed in 1963, andthe property, which corresponds to the "old" landfill area of H.O.D. Landfill, was later used for the disposal of theVillage's municipal waste. Private waste disposal on the Quaker property in the same general area as the CunninghamDump continued until 1965; however, the exact location of this disposal area is not known. Other landfill areas alongSequoit and Anita Avenues have been filled for industrial development.

Quaker Industries, Inc. manufactures wood and metal tray tables and utilizes hot and cold solvent processes. Afterlandfilling began at H.O.D., Quaker built a storage warehouse over the covered refuse at the Cunningham Dump, whichwas sold to Malnekoff Closeouts in 1987. According to information supplied by Quaker to USEPA, the wastesgenerated from Quaker's operations included paint thinners, sludges, and lacquers. Supplemental permits for the H.O.D.Landfill allowed the disposal of Quaker paints, coolants, paint booth oversprays, and water soluble oil and stain. Correspondence between Quaker and the State of Illinois in the late 1960s indicated that the company dischargeduntreated industrial effluent to Sequoit Creek or the adjacent wetlands. Reportedly, the chemicals used in the Quakermanufacturing process were discharged via a currently existing pipe located near the southwestern corner of the H.O.D.site.

In 1988, Quaker obtained a National Pollution Discharge Effluent System (NPDES) permit for the discharge ofapproximately 30,000 gallons per day of non-contact cooling water to Sequoit Creek. Quaker has also reportedly storeddrums of wastes at the plant. In 1980, Quaker applied for a RCRA permit for the storage of hazardous wastes, whichwas withdrawn in 1983. In 1984, USEPA informed Quaker that it did not require a permit for its storage operations, as itwas a small quantity generator.

Potential contamination sources at the plant include floor drains, sanitary sewer discharges, and air emissions of VOCs(until 1980). The company has a history of underground storage tanks (USTs) on its property. Reportedly, a 10,000-gallon steel underground oil storage tank was installed around 1961 and was removed in 1989, due to non-use. A200,000-gallon concrete underground water tank, for the operation of a sprinkler system was installed in 1964. It was lastused in 1975. Another steel 500-750-gallon tank is reportedly used for the storage of used oil or water.

2. The Antioch Township Highway Department

The Antioch Township Highway Department has three registered USTs near the site. A 4,000-gallon unlined steel tankis used to store gasoline, and a 1,000-gallon unlined steel tank stores diesel fuel. The tanks have been painted to preventcorrosion. A third UST, of unspecified size has been unused since 1983. It is not known if it is painted.

3. Chicago Ink and Research Company, Inc.

Chicago Ink and Research Company, Inc. has been manufacturing industrial ink in the industrial park since 1956. Hazardous wastes generated by the company may include solvent washes and sludges, caustic washes and sludges, andwater washes and sludges from cleaning equipment, soaps, and stabilizers containing chromium and lead. The companyhas a registered 60-gallon lined UST which is painted, but its contents are unknown.

4. Galdine Electronics, Inc.

Galdine Electronics, Inc., a manufacturer of printed electronic circuit boards has been operating in the industrial parksince the late 1960s. Hazardous wastes generated by the company reportedly include methylene chloride, hydrochloricacid mixture, chromic acid solution, plating sludge, and a flammable liquid waste. Rinse water from their manufacturingprocesses is discharged into the Village of Antioch sanitary sewers.

5. Nu-Way Speaker Products, Inc.

Nu-Way Speaker Products, Inc., an affiliate of Galdine Electronics, Inc. was a former manufacturer of printed circuitboards in the industrial park. A non-hazardous spent copper etching solution by-product was generated duringoperations.

6. Major Industrial Truck, Inc.

Major Industrial Truck, Inc. has sold, serviced, and rented forklifts at the industrial park since around 1975. No productsare manufactured on-site. The company has notified IEPA that it ships ignitable hazardous wastes to Safety KleenCorporation in Elgin, Illinois for treatment and disposal.

7. Roll Foil Laminating, Inc.

Roll Foil Laminating, Inc. is present in the park, and in March of 1987, the company filed a Notification of HazardousWaste Activity report with USEPA, which specified that the company generated less than 1,000 kilograms per month ofnon-halogenated solvents.

Source: Waste Management of Illinois, Inc.


APPENDIX B
Tables

Table 1.

On-Site Groundwater Monitoring Well Contaminants.
ORGANICS
ChemicalFrequencyof DetectionConcentration(ppb)ComparisonValue (ppb)Source
Bis(2-ethylhexyl)
phthalate (DEHP)
8/10ND-4,100*3CREG
Trichloroethene10/38ND-7 3CREG
1,2-Dichloroethene (total) 6/11ND-100 70LTHA**
GROUNDWATER HYDROPUNCH®
Vinyl Chloride1/1188.40.2EMEG (Chronic) Child
Cis-1,2 Dichloroethene 1/1110.370 LTHA
INORGANICS
Cadmium 2/9ND-62EMEG (Chronic)
Manganese 23/23ND-20950RMEG
Arsenic 1/7ND-53EMEG (Chronic) Child
Sodium 24/25ND-57,40020,000USEPA Guidance Level
Zinc 107/112ND-4,6403,000RMEG Child
Sulfate13/13ND-910,800250,000SMCL
Boron 127/127ND-388100EMEG Child
ppb = parts per billion ND = not detected ® = Trademark name
est. = estimated concentration * = also detected in blank
** = comparison value based on cis-1,2-dichloroethene

(Sources: Ecology and Environment, 1989; Waste Management of Illinois, Inc., 1992; Warzyn, 1992; and 1980 Federal Register)

Table 2.

Leachate Contaminants.
Chemical Concentration (ppb)
BenzeneND-21
TolueneBDL-170
TetrachloroetheneND-1.4
cis-1,2-Dichloroethene0.5-0.6
trans-1,2-Dichloroethene0.6-45
1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene11-72
TrichloroetheneND-0.6
n-Propylbenzene1.9-6.3
Naphthalene6.1-22.3
1,3,5-Trimethylbenzene3-12
p-Isopropyltoluene1.3-13.8
Isopropylbenzene2.5-5.7
sec-Butylbenzene0.5-2.5
ChlorobenzeneND-2.6
m-Dichlorobenzene8.2-10.0
o-Xylene14.8-46.2
m-Xylene29.8-103
Ethyl benzene5.6-230
o-ChlorotolueneND-6.0
p-DichlorobenzeneND-31.2
Methylene ChlorideND-45
1,2-DichloropropaneND-10

ND = not detected ppb = parts per billion
(Sources: Ecology and Environment, 1989; and Warzyn, 1992)

Table 3.

On-Site Subsurface Soil Contaminants.
Organic Chemical Frequency of Detection Concentration (ppb) Comparison
Value (ppb)
Source
Di-n-butylphthalate 8/13 120-1,400(est.)* None None
Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate 8/13 190-710* 40 RMEG (pica child)
Chrysene 1/13 ND-51 (est.) None None
Di-n-octylphthalate 3/13 ND-83 (est.) None None
2-methylnaphthalene 1/13 ND-51 (est.) None None
Phenanthrene 4/13 ND-83 (est.) None None
Inorganic Chemical Frequency of detection Concentration
(ppm)
Comparison
Value (ppm)
Source
Arsenic 9/13 ND-12 0.4 CREG
Beryllium 9/13 ND-1.2 0.2 CREG
Chromium 13/13 3.8-19 (est.) 10 RMEG** (pica child)
Cobalt 12/13 ND-13 None None
Copper 13/13 7.3-31 None None
Lead 13/13 8.9-16 (est.) None None
Manganese 13/13 84-713 10 RMEG (pica child)
Nickel 13/13 8.7-40 None None
Vanadium 13/13 4.9-65 None None
ppb = parts per billion ppm = parts per million * = also detected in blank
est. = estimated concentration ** = based on Chromium (VI)
(Source: Ecology and Environment, 1989)

Table 4.

Off-site Groundwater Monitoring Well Contaminants.
Chemical Frequency of
Detection
Concentration (ppb) Comparison
Value (ppb)
Source
Benzene 1/13 ND-8 1 CREG
Manganese 7/8 ND-282 50 RMEG (Child)
Boron 3/3 148-483 100 EMEG (Inter.) Child
Sodium 8/8 16,600-81,500 20,000 USEPA Guidance Level
ppb = parts per billion ND = not detected
(Sources: Ecology and Environment, 1989; Warzyn, 1992, and 1980 Federal Register)

Table 5.

Antioch Public Water Supply Contaminants.
ORGANICS
Chemical Frequency of Detection Concentration (ppb) Comparison Value (ppb) Source
Tetrachloroethylene 2/28 ND-1.6 0.7 CREG
Vinyl Chloride 11/28 ND-6.7 0.2 EMEG (Chronic) Child
INORGANICS
Arsenic 24/37 ND-5 0.02 CREG
Aluminum 1/26 ND-1364 None None
Boron 36/36 ND-460 100 EMEG (Inter.) Child
Cobalt 1/36 ND-5 None None
Lead 12/35 ND-17 15 USEPA Action Level
Sodium 38/38 21,200-62,000 20,000 USEPA Guidance Level
Thallium 1/1 ND-8.91 (est.)* 0.4 LTHA
ppb = parts per billion; est. = estimated value;
ND = not detected;

* = possible lab matrix problem - also detected in blank

(Sources: IEPA files; Ecology and Environment, 1989; Warzyn, 1992; and 1980 Federal Register)

Table 6.

Private Well Contaminants.
Chemical Frequency of
Detection
Concentration
(ppb)
Comparison
Value (ppb)
Source
Arsenic 1/7 ND-2 (est.) 0.02 CREG
Sodium 7/7 25,000-58,900 20,000 USEPA Guidance Level
Thallium 6/7 ND-5.76 (est.)* 0.4 LTHA
ppb = parts per billion est. = estimated concentration
ND = not detected

* = possible lab matrix problem - also detected in blank

(Sources: Ecology and Environment, 1989; and 1980 Federal Register)

Table 7.

Off-site Subsurface Soil Contaminants.
ORGANICS
Chemical Frequency Concentration (ppb) Comparison Value (ppb) Source
Di-n-butylphthalate 25/31 290 (est.)-5500* None None
Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate 4/31 ND-2400* (est.) 40 RMEG (pica child)
Di-n-octylphthalate 5/31 ND-67 (est.) None None
Benzo[a]anthracene 1/31 ND-65 (est.) None None
Benzo[b]fluoranthene 2/31 ND-57 (est.) None None
Benzo[k]fluoranthene 1/31 ND-69 (est.) None None
Indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene 1/31 ND-62 None None
Dibenzo[a,h]anthracene 1/31 ND-65 (est.) None None
Phenanthrene 1/31 ND-66 (est.) None None
Butylbenzylphthalate 2/31 ND-55 (est.) None None
INORGANICS
Chemical Frequency Concentration (ppm) Comparison value (ppm) Source
Arsenic 18/31 ND-20 0.4 CREG (Chronic)
Beryllium 18/31 ND-1.3 0.2 CREG
Chromium 30/31 ND-27 10 RMEG (pica child)
Manganese 31/31 168-708 (est.) 10 RMEG (pica child)
ND = not detected est. = estimated concentration
ppb = parts per billion ppm = parts per million * = also detected in laboratory blank

(Source: Ecology and Environment, 1989)


Table 8.

H.O.D. Landfill Contaminants of Concern
Chemical Concentration in
Groundwater (ppb)
Comparison Value (ppb) Source
Vinyl Chloride ND-6.7; 188.4* 0.2 EMEG (Chronic) Child
Benzene ND-8 1 CREG
Thallium ND-8.91 (est.)** 0.4 LTHA
Bis(2-ethylhexyl)
phthalate
ND-4,100* 3 CREG
Sodium ND-81,500 20,000 USEPA Guidance Level
ND = not detected ppb = parts per billion
(est.) = estimated concentration * = hydropunch sample
* * = also detected in blank

Table 9.

COMPLETED PATHWAYS
Pathway Name Source Environmental Media Point of Exposure Route of Exposure Exposed Population Time
Public wells HOD Groundwater (municipal water supply) Residences and Businesses (taps) Ingestion, Inhalation, Dermal Contact Consumers of municipal
well number 4 (estimated number of potential receptors = 4,400)
Past, Present, Future
Private wells HOD Groundwater
(private wells)
Residences (taps) Ingestion Consumers of sampled private wells (estimated number of potential receptors = 50) Past, Present, Future

Table 10.

POTENTIAL PATHWAYS
Pathway Name Source Environmental Media Point of Exposure Route of Exposure Exposed Population Time
Biota HOD Biota Sequoit Creek

Wetlands

Ingestion Fishermen, hunters, recreational users Past, Present, Future
Surface Water HOD Surface Water Sequoit Creek

Wetlands

Dermal Contact, Ingestion Fishermen, hunters, recreational users Past, Present, Future
Sediment HOD Sediment Sequoit Creek Dermal Contact, Ingestion Fishermen, hunters, recreational users, remediation personnel Past, Present, Future
Soil Gas HOD Soil Gas On- and off-site residences and buildings Inhalation Nearby residents, remediation personnel, trespassers Past, Present, Future



APPENDIX C

Figures


Figure 1. Location of HOD Landfill


Figure 2. Antioch Municipal Wells


Figure 3. Residential Wells


Figure 4. Monitoring Wells


Figure 5. Soil Boring Locations


Figure 6. Sequoit Industrial Park


Figure 7. Antioch Water System


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