Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to site content

PUBLIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT

Sites P, Q and R

SAUGET AREA 2 LANDFILL
(a/k/a SAUGET AND COUNTY LANDFILL (SITE Q))
SAUGET, ST. CLAIR COUNTY, ILLINOIS


SUMMARY

Sauget Area 2 is a proposed National Priorities List site. This public health assessment prepared by the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) evaluates Area 2 Sites P, Q and R. A separate public health assessment evaluated Sauget Area 2 Sites O and S.

The source of contamination at these sites included industrial subsurface waste disposal at Site P, Q, and R from nearby industries. Contaminants at these sites include polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), nitrobenzenes, chlorinated solvent wastes, pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and metals.

The sites consist of mostly inactive landfills with commercial and industrial areas in the northern section of Site Q and southern portion of Site P. The southern portion of Site Q is not fenced, and has evidence of trespassing. Site R is the location of the Sauget Toxic Dump, which is also known as the Krummerich Landfill.

Based on the limited number of surface soil samples collected in the northern section of Site Q, IDPH has concluded that Site Q in Sauget Area 2 poses no apparent public health hazard. PCB levels in the surface soil at Site Q should not pose a health risk to exposed workers.

Sites P and R within Sauget Area 2 pose no apparent public health hazard for exposure to contaminated soil and groundwater. Contamination exists in subsurface soil and in groundwater, but no one is exposed to these chemicals. MCPP in fish may increase the risk of non-cancer adverse health effects over a long period for children eating catfish caught near Site R. The source of MCPP in the fish is not known.

IDPH recommends that children's consumption of channel catfish from the Mississippi River along Sauget Area 2 be limited to twelve fish meals per year to reduce the risk of non-cancer adverse health effects.


PURPOSE AND HEALTH ISSUES

The Sauget Area 2 site was proposed for addition to the National Priorities List on September 13, 2001. Area 2 consists of Site O, and landfills P, Q, R, and S. In this public health assessment, the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) examined whether exposure to contaminants at Sites P, Q and R has occurred in the past, is occurring, or may occur in the future. Site O and Landfill S are addressed in a separate public health assessment.

Site P is in a mixed industrial and commercial area, with the nearest homes 0.3 miles east across a four-lane highway. Site R is fenced and is covered by a clay cap. Employees of the businesses in the northern section of Site Q are currently most likely to be exposed to site-related contaminants. Past and future exposures may occur in workers sampling or monitoring the sites and excavating or otherwise disturbing the contaminated areas.


BACKGROUND

Location and History

Sauget is in St. Clair County, Illinois south of East St. Louis and across the Mississippi River from St. Louis, Missouri. Sauget is surrounded by several large industries and has many areas of contamination. These contaminated areas are collectively known as the Sauget Sites and include areas in the communities of Sauget and Cahokia, Illinois (Figure 1). The Sauget Sites are divided into two areas, Area 1 and Area 2. The dividing line for Areas 1 and 2 is Illinois Route 3, with the sites east of Route 3 belonging to Area 1 and those to the west in Area 2. This public health assessment evaluates Sites P, Q and R in Area 2 (Figure 2).

Site P

Site P covers approximately 20 acres in the northwestern part of Sauget. The site is an inactive landfill permitted by the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (Illinois EPA). Site P has steep slopes along the sides of the landfill, which are somewhat eroded. Access to the site is not restricted and a nightclub is located on top of its southern end. Surface runoff from the site is toward the low area in the south-central portion of the site. This low area is the result of a water line that crosses the property (1). The site is bordered to the west by the Illinois Gulf Railroad, to the east by the Terminal Railroad Association, and to the south by Monsanto Avenue. Surface drainage does not leave the site due to the railroad embankments and the depression in the central portion of the site (1).

Site Q

Site Q is an inactive waste disposal facility in Sauget and Cahokia that covers approximately 90 acres. Sauget and Company operated the facility between 1966 and 1973 (1). The site is on the east bank of the Mississippi River and is on the river side of the flood control levee. The site was flooded in 1973 and 1993 (2).

The Pillsbury Company occupies much of Site Q. It operates a coal and grain transfer facility on the site. River City Landscape Supply occupies 10 acres of Site Q along the Mississippi River. A company located south of River City Landscape Supply reclaims re-bar from building materials. Three barge terminals are located along the river at Site Q. A railroad spur divides the site into northern and southern sections. A chain link fence on the north side and a guard at the gate restrict vehicular traffic. Pedestrian access is not restricted in the southern portion of the site.

Site Q was operated as a landfill without an Illinois EPA permit. The north site was registered with IDPH in 1967, before the formation of Illinois EPA (1). The site is presently covered with black cinders, which makes it highly permeable.

In early 1972, a smoldering underground fire was observed at the site, which continued until October 1972. During flooding in 1973, exposed refuse was observed being carried downstream (1). Beginning in 1972, Sauget and Company applied several times for a permit to extend the landfill in the southern portion of Site Q. Illinois EPA denied these extension permits, but disposal reportedly continued in this area (1).

In 1993, flooding of the Mississippi River inundated Site Q for several months, and left drums exposed in portions of the site. In May 1994, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Technical Assistance Team contractor Ecology and Environment (E & E) collected three drum samples from Site Q. This was done after exposed drums were noted on the embankment of the Mississippi River because of scouring that occurred during the flood of 1993. In November 1994, Illinois EPA and IDPH collected surface soil samples from Site Q, including two drum samples. In 1995, USEPA removed surface waste materials, including exposed drums, along the shoreline of the Mississippi River and repaired exposed sections of the fill area.

On October 18, 1999, USEPA began removing wastes including drums from the southern portion of Site Q. The removal involved approximately 25 acres in a low area where water ponded and persons fished. This removal was prompted by PCB-contaminated surface wastes and soils and the presence of exposed drums. Removal included 3,271 drums and about 17,000 tons of waste, and was completed in April 2000 (5). Cleanup funds were limited, so the southern portion of the site still contains contaminated areas and drums protruding from the ground (5).

Site R

Site R is the location of the Sauget Toxic Dump, which is also known as the Krummerich Landfill. The site is owned by Monsanto Chemical Company and was used as a landfill by Monsanto from 1957 to 1977. Site R is north and west of Site Q on the river side of the flood control levee (Figure 2). Site R is covered with a clay cap and is vegetated. Closure of Site R was completed in October 1979. Drainage flows to ditches along the perimeter of the site. Access to Site R is restricted by a chainlink fence and monitored by television cameras. An estimated 262,500 tons of liquid and solid industrial waste was disposed of at Site R. In 1968 and 1972, Monsanto submitted two reports to Illinois EPA concerning the waste disposed at Site R. Site R was flooded by the Mississippi River in 1973 and 1993.

Demographics and Land Use

Most of Sauget Area 2 is either landfill or industrial property. Agricultural land is also present in the eastern portion of Area 2 and to the south of Area 2 along Cargill Road. Commercial property including a nightclub are south and east of Site P. Industries in Area 2 include the American Bottoms Regional Waste Water Treatment, the Sauget Waste Water Treatment Plant, Trade Waste Incinerator, and Phillips Petroleum Company. The number of employees that work in businesses in Area 2 is estimated to be 150. Nearby industries also include Cerro Copper, Big River Zinc, and Solutia.

No permanent residents live within Sauget Area 2 (3). The nearest home is about 0.3 miles east of the Site P, across Route 3 in East St. Louis, Illinois. The home nearest Site Q is 0.75 miles east across Route 3 (Sauget) and southeast (Cahokia). The home nearest Site R is approximately 0.8 miles east, across Route 3 in Sauget, Illinois. The population within 1 mile of Area 2 is about 9,000, including 711 children less than 5 years of age and 2,185 between 5 - 17 years of age (3).

Environmental Sampling at Site P

Environmental sampling at Site P consisted of four subsurface soil samples collected by Ecology and Environment, Inc. (E and E) in February 1987 and four surface samples collected by Illinois EPA and IDPH in March 1994 (see Figure 3). Chemicals analyzed in these samples included volatile organic chemicals (VOCs), semi-volatile organic chemicals (SVOCs), inorganic chemicals, pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).

Environmental Sampling at Site Q

Illinois EPA collected several samples from Site Q in the 1970s including leachate, ponded surface water, and groundwater. These samples were analyzed only for inorganic chemicals and a few organic chemicals.

Illinois EPA collected two samples from leachate seeps in October 1981 and three more leachate samples in September 1983. These samples were analyzed for inorganic chemicals and a few organic chemicals, including phenols and PCBs.

In July 1983, USEPA had E & E investigate the northern portion of Site Q in response to the drums uncovered in this area in 1980. This study involved a geophysical investigation and subsurface soil sampling. The subsurface sampling consisted of 35 samples collected from 18 locations. The depths of the samples ranged from 10 to 26 feet (1). The sample analysis included 112 organic chemicals including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)(1).

In 1987, E & E collected groundwater samples from eight locations. These samples were analyzed for inorganic chemicals, VOCs, SVOCs, pesticides, and PCBs.

On July 21 and 22, 1987, E & E collected six air samples (Figure 5). A blank sample was collected for each of the two days. The wind on July 21 was generally from the south-southwest and south, while on July 22 it was predominantly from the southeast. The samples were analyzed for VOCs, SVOCs, pesticides, PCBs, and metals. Based on the wind direction at the time of sampling, the airborne contaminants from Site R would not be represented in these samples.

In March 1994, Illinois EPA collected eight surface soil samples and two drum samples (Figure 4)(4). In May 1994, E & E collected three drum samples at Site Q(5).

In 1994, Geraghty and Miller conducted an expanded remedial investigation on the northern section of Site Q (6). This investigation included a magnetometer survey (to identify buried drums), a soil gas survey, subsurface soil samples, groundwater samples, and ambient air monitoring. Sixty soil gas samples and eleven subsurface soil samples were collected as part of the expanded investigation. Ten air samples were collected on three consecutive days in July 1994. The air samples consisted of four samples upwind and six samples downwind of the northern section of Site Q. Seven groundwater wells were sampled during the investigation.

On October 18, 1999, USEPA began removing wastes and drums from the southern portion of Site Q (7). The removal was prompted by PCB-contaminated surface wastes and soils. Waste, drummed material, surface soil, subsurface soil, and groundwater samples were collected as part of the removal action. Six of the surface soil samples were collected in the southern ponded area of Site Q and fourteen surface soil samples were collected on railroad property (presumably not landfilled) where a road was placed to get the waste from the removal area to the railroad tracks for loading. The fourteen railroad samples were collected to see if the transfer of site wastes contaminated the surface soil in this area. Seven samples were collected before the waste was transferred and seven were collected after the operation was complete (Figure 4).

The collection of additional environmental samples at Site Q including air, groundwater, waste, and surface soil began in June 2002 and continued into fall 2002 (8).

Environmental Sampling at Site R

In August 1968, IDPH collected five groundwater samples at Site R. Analysis of these samples was limited to alkalinity, total solids, and phenol. Illinois EPA collected another set of samples from these wells in December 1972. These samples were analyzed for inorganic chemicals, phenols, and oil. In January 1973, Illinois EPA collected samples from three waste ponds and analyzed these for phenol. Illinois EPA sampled the monitoring wells and an industrial well located northwest of the site annually between 1973 and 1976. All well samples collected before 1976 were analyzed for inorganic chemicals and phenols. The 1976 well samples were analyzed for PCBs in addition to inorganic chemicals and phenols.

In 1977, D'Appolonia Consulting Engineers installed eight monitoring wells during a subsurface investigation of the site. In 1979, Illinois EPA sampled these eight wells and analyzed the samples for inorganic and organic chemicals reportedly disposed of in the landfill. In March 1981, Illinois EPA again sampled the wells and analyzed the samples for organic chemicals.

In October 1981, Illinois EPA collected leachate and sediment samples on the side of the landfill next to the Mississippi River. These samples were collected from leachate seeps that were flowing into the river.

In November 1981, a USEPA contractor collected leachate and sediment samples from three seeps along the Mississippi River. Eight samples were collected, which consisted of three leachate samples, two duplicate leachate samples and three sediment samples. These samples were analyzed for dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans, inorganic chemicals, and organic chemicals.

In 1987, E & E collected seven groundwater samples including one duplicate from six locations. These samples were analyzed for inorganic chemicals, VOCs, SVOCs, pesticides, and PCBs.

A Remedial Investigation (RI) was conducted at Site R beginning in 1992 (9). Environmental samples for the RI included soil gas, ambient air, surface soil, sediment, subsurface soil (25 from eight locations in 1989 and 48 from 16 locations in 1992), and groundwater from 22 wells. Approximately 280 soil gas samples from 90 locations were collected in 1999 before the RI. The soil gas samples were analyzed for VOCs. Nine ambient air samples were collected in July 1992 and consisted of two downwind samples and one upwind sample for three consecutive days. Ambient air samples were analyzed for VOCs, SVOCs, and metals. Eighteen surface soil samples were collected in 1989, eight from the clay cap and ten from the perimeter. Eight sediment samples were collected from the storm water trenches around the perimeter of the site. Sediment samples were analyzed for VOCs, SVOCs, pesticides, PCBs, and metals. Seventy-three subsurface samples were collected or used in the RI. These sediment samples consisted of 25 samples from eight locations in 1989 and 48 samples from 16 locations in 1992. Subsurface samples were analyzed for VOCs, SVOCs, pesticides, PCBs, and metals. Groundwater from 22 wells was analyzed for inorganic chemicals, VOCs, SVOCs, pesticides, PCBs, and metals.

In October and November 2000, surface water, sediment, and fish samples were collected in the Mississippi River upstream and downstream of Sites R and Q (8). Samples were collected next to Site R (Figure 6) and upstream and downstream of Site R. The fish samples collected included whole catfish and big mouth buffalo fish fillets. Samples were analyzed for VOCs, SVOCs, pesticides, PCBs, dioxins, furans, and metals.

The collection of additional air, groundwater, waste, and surface soil samples at Site R began in June 2002 and continued through the fall of 2002 (10).

Site Visit

IDPH has made several site visits; the most recent was on October 2, 2003. During the flood of 1993, IDPH observed the condition of the site. IDPH staff visited Site Q during drum removal in the fall of 1999. Evidence of trespass, including spent shotgun shells and motorcycle and all-terrain-vehicle tracks, was noted during on site visits to Site Q. Persons have been seen fishing at the ponds at the south end of Site Q and the Mississippi River bank on site Q. After the flood of 1993, drums were exposed on the bank of the Mississippi River at Site Q and in the central portion of Site Q.


DISCUSSION

Chemicals of Interest

IDPH compared the results of each air, soil, sediment, fish, leachate, surface water, and groundwater sample with appropriate screening comparison values used to select chemicals for further evaluation for carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic health effects. Chemicals found at levels greater than comparison values or those for which no comparison values exist were selected for further evaluation. The chemicals of interest are shown in Tables 1 through 7. A brief explanation of the comparison values used is found in Attachment 1.

Surface Soil

Surface soil samples were collected from the top 6 inches. The chemicals of interest in surface soil from Sites P, Q, and R include PCBs, lead, cadmium, arsenic, benzene, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and pesticides (Table 1). The surface soil samples at Site R were from the clay cap and along the perimeter. The surface soils in the ponded area of Site Q have been removed by USEPA.

Subsurface Soil

Subsurface samples were collected from Sites P, Q and R. Forty-one chemicals of interest were identified in subsurface soil samples (Table 2). Many subsurface soil samples were from well boring cores that were through the waste materials at the landfills.

Drums and Waste

Drums have been exposed in several locations at Site Q due to flooding. Drums sampled from the southern portion of Site Q were mostly unexposed drums uncovered during the USEPA 2000-2001 removal activity (5). USEPA also sampled waste piles during the removal activity. All the drums and waste tested were ultimately removed (4). Using the comparison values for soil, forty-three chemicals of interest were identified in the drums and waste (Table 3).

Sediments

Sediments were collected from drainage areas around Site R, including the soil under seeps flowing from Site R to the Mississippi River. In addition, an ecological risk assessment conducted by Menzie-Cura included Mississippi River sediments upstream, along Site R, and downstream of Site R. Using the comparison values for soil, IDPH identified sixteen chemicals of interest in the sediment samples (Table 4).

Groundwater

Seventy-two chemicals of interest were identified in the groundwater under Sites Q and R (Table 5). IDPH used drinking water comparison values to select chemicals of interest for groundwater.

Surface Water

Nine chemicals of interest were identified in the Mississippi River (Table 6) including chlorinated VOCs and SVOCs. No PCBs were detected in the surface water. IDPH used drinking water comparison values for the surface water samples.

Leachate

The leachate samples were collected from the west side of Site R before they enter the Mississippi River. Sixteen chemicals of interest were found in the leachate samples including PCBs, chloroaniline, chlorobenzene, chlorophenol, nitroaniline, nitrophenol, and 2,4-D (Table 6).

Fish

Fish sampled included whole channel catfish and big mouth buffalo fish. 2-2 Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy proprionic acid (MCPP) was the only chemical that exceeded an oral health guideline (Table 7).

Air

Twenty-one chemicals of interest, including PCBs, chlorinated solvents, and metals, were identified from air sampling results at Sites Q and R (Table 8).

Exposure Analysis

Exposure to a chemical at a level that exceeds a comparison value does not necessarily mean that adverse health effects will result. The potential for exposed persons to experience adverse health effects depends on:

  • how much of each chemical a person is exposed to,
  • how long a person is exposed, and
  • the health condition of the exposed person.

A chemical can affect people only if they contact it through an exposure pathway at a sufficient concentration to cause a toxic effect. This requires a source of exposure, an environmental transport medium, a point of exposure, a route of exposure, and a receptor population. A pathway is complete if all components are present and if people were exposed in the past, are currently exposed, or will be exposed in the future. If parts of a pathway are absent, data are insufficient to decide whether it is complete, or exposure may occur at some time (past, present, future), then it is a potential pathway. If part of a pathway is not present and will never exist, the pathway is incomplete and can be eliminated from further consideration.

In the past, before closing and capping of Site R and remediation of surface waste at Site Q, exposure to elevated levels of some contaminants may have occurred. Exposure to site-related chemicals in the past may have included surface water, sediments, exposed waste and drums, and soil, and it is not known if they would have resulted in adverse health effects. The following section will discuss current exposure pathways at the site.

Completed Exposure Pathways

Completed exposure pathways (Table 9) exist for contaminants in surface soil at Sites P and Q, air at Sites Q and R, surface water, and fish in the Mississippi River. Exposure can occur by breathing contaminated air, coming into direct contact with the soil, water, or waste, ingesting the chemicals, or absorbing them through the skin.

Air

Exposure to airborne chemicals could occur for workers at Site Q, including workers at the barge terminals and the landscape supply company. Exposure was estimated for adult workers working an 8-hour work day. The maximum levels of chemicals in the workers' ambient air are much less than the U.S. Department of Labor Occupational Health and Safety Administration permissible exposure limits for these chemicals. No adverse health effects would be expected from worker exposure to airborne contaminants.

Fish

IDPH estimated the exposure of children eating fish caught near the site. Using the maximum levels of chemicals found in fish, we assumed that a 16-kilogram child ate 16 grams of fish per day for half the year. Calculations were done for buffalo fish fillets and whole catfish. The levels of chemicals in whole catfish were reduced by 50% to adjust for their loss during cleaning and cooking the fish.

Based on the exposure scenarios, MCPP in catfish caught near Site R may increase the risk of non-cancer adverse health effects if consumed over a long period. Available data suggest a low potential of MCPP to bioaccumulate in fish (11). The source of MCPP in channel catfish is not known. No increased risk of cancer is expected from eating fish from the Mississippi River near Site R.

Surface Water

Exposure to surface water by incidental ingestion was calculated for teenagers. We assumed that a 55-kilogram teenager ingested 100 milliliters of water during recreation twice per week for 17 weeks of the year. Based on this exposure scenario, no adverse health effects would be expected from exposure to chemicals in the Mississippi River near the sites.

Surface Soil

Surface soil exposures were estimated for Sites P and Q using their respective chemicals of interest. The exposure scenario for Site P was 55 kilogram teenagers ingesting 100 milligrams of surface soil when entering the site 2 days per week, 26 weeks per year. Based on this exposure scenario, no adverse health effects would be expected from exposure to surface soil at Site P.

The two exposure scenarios at Site Q were for a teenager using the southern portion of the site and an adult worker in the northern section of the site. For the teenager exposure scenario we assumed that a 55 kilogram teenager ingested 100 milligrams of surface soil when entering the site 2 days per week, 26 weeks per year. Based on this exposure scenario, no chemicals are expected to cause adverse health effects for the teenage trespassers. Lead was found in one sample in the southern portion of Site Q at a level of 1,920 parts per million (ppm). The next highest level of lead found in this area was 161 ppm. Lead levels greater than 1,000 ppm in residential soils may be a hazard for children six years of age and younger. Exposure to lead at Site Q is not considered a health hazard because trespassers would be older than six years of age, Site Q is not residential soil where exposure would be continuous, and only one of fourteen samples was greater than 1,000 ppm. Also, consistent exposure to the highest levels of lead in soil would be unlikely.

For workers contacting surface soil in the northern section of Site Q, we assumed exposure to the average levels detected in the four samples collected by Illinois EPA in 1994. We assumed the workers are exposed to the soil 5 days per week for 50 weeks per year. Based on this exposure scenario and limited sampling, no apparent increased cancer risk would be expected.

Potential Exposure Pathways

Potential exposure pathways (Table 10) could occur during remediation or otherwise by disturbing or contacting surface soil, subsurface soil, and groundwater. Workers remediating site-related contaminants should wear protective clothing.

The nearest drinking water well is upgradient of Area 2, approximately 0.75 miles southeast of Site Q. No drinking water wells are in use near Area 2. The Fox Terminal industrial well is approximately 0.1 miles south of Site Q. Extensive groundwater contamination exists, but no known contact with groundwater occurs near the sites. Groundwater contaminants will not be considered further in this assessment.


TOXICOLOGICAL EVALUATION

The estimated exposure doses were compared with health guidelines for non-cancer health effects. An increased risk of non-cancer adverse health effects in children may exist from exposure to MCPP in fish from the Mississippi River near Site R.

2-2 Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy proprionic acid (MCPP)

The level of MCPP found in fish was greater than the USEPA chronic oral reference dose for children. Exceeding the chronic oral reference dose does not mean that adverse health effects will occur. The USEPA chronic oral reference dose for MCPP is based on a study where rats were exposed to levels similar to our estimated dose for MCPP found in the 2000 fish sampling. These rats had increased absolute and relative kidney weights after being exposed to MCPP for 90 days (14). Exposure is based on whole catfish samples and available data suggest a low potential for MCPP to bioaccumulate in fish. The MCPP level in the edible portion of the fish may be much lower. MCPP was not detected in big mouth buffalo fish fillets collected from the same area.


COMMUNITY HEALTH CONCERNS

No community health concerns were identified for Sites P, Q, and R. Sauget and Cahokia residents have concerns about other areas in the Sauget Sites. These concerns have been addressed in the public health assessment for Sauget Area 1.

This public health assessment was made available for public comment from December 18, 2002 to April 11, 2003. No public comments were received.


CHILD HEALTH CONSIDERATIONS

IDPH recognizes that children are especially sensitive to some chemicals. Children's exposure to Area 2 contaminants would be limited to the southern section of Site Q and Mississippi River fish. Children are not expected to be exposed to contaminants at Site R because it is fenced. Site P is not easily accessible to children because they must cross Illinois Route 3, and the northern portion of Site Q contains active businesses. We estimated exposure for teenage trespassers on the southern portion of Site Q. No chemicals at Site Q are expected to cause adverse health effects or increased cancer risk in the teenage trespassers.

MCPP in fish may increase the risk of non-cancer adverse health effects over a long period for children eating catfish caught near Site R. Available data suggest a low potential for MCPP to bioaccumulate in fish (12). MCPP was detected only in whole channel catfish. The source of MCPP in channel catfish is not known. Parents should follow the proper fish cooking and cleaning guidelines in the Illinois Fishing Information publication from the Department of Natural Resources to reduce exposure to contaminants in fish.


CONCLUSIONS

IDPH concludes that Sauget Sites Area 2, Site Q, in Sauget, Illinois, poses no apparent public health hazard. PCB levels in the surface soil at Site Q should not pose a health risk to exposed workers; however, only a limited number of surface soil samples were collected in the northern section of Site Q. MCPP in fish may increase the risk of non-cancer adverse health effects over a long period for children eating catfish caught near Site R. The source of MCPP in the fish is not known.

Sites P and R, within Sauget Sites Area 2, pose no apparent public health hazard for exposure to contaminated soil and groundwater. This conclusion is based on the fact that estimated exposure to the highest levels of chemicals detected during environmental sampling would not be expected to cause adverse health effects. Contamination exists in subsurface soil and in groundwater, but no one is exposed to these chemicals.

In the past, before closing and capping of Site R and remediation of surface waste at Site Q, exposure to elevated levels of some contaminants may have occurred. Exposure to site-related chemicals in the past may have included surface water, sediments, exposed waste and drums, and soil, and it is not known if they would have resulted in adverse health effects.


RECOMMENDATIONS

IDPH recommends that:

  1. Children's consumption of channel catfish from the Mississippi River along Sauget Area 2 be limited to twelve fish meals per year. This recommendation corresponds to the fish advisory established for that part of the river by the Illinois Fish Contaminant Monitoring Program.

  2. USEPA sample surface soil in the northern portion of Site Q to better characterize the potential for workers to be exposed to PCBs. IDPH will re-evaluate the surface soil exposure pathway when results of these samples are available.

PUBLIC HEALTH ACTION PLAN

IDPH will re-evaluate worker exposure to surface soil when the results of samples collected in the northern portion of Site Q are available.


PREPARERS OF REPORT

Preparer
David R. Webb, M.S.
Environmental Toxicologist
Illinois Department of Public Health

Reviewers
Ken Runkle & Jennifer Davis
Environmental Toxicologists
Illinois Department of Public Health

ATSDR Regional Representative
Mark Johnson
Regional Operations
Office of the Assistant Administrator

ATSDR Technical Project Officers
Allen Robison
Division of Health Assessment and Consultation

Sylvia Allen-Lewis
Division of Health Education and Promotion

Steve Inserra
Division of Health Studies


REFERENCES

  1. Ecology and Environment, Inc. DRAFT Remedial Investigation Dead Creek Project Sites at Cahokia/Sauget, Illinois. Volumes 1 & 2. March 1988.

  2. IDPH, Site Visits, 1993.

  3. US 2000 Census data, US Department of Commerce, Bureau of Census, 2000.

  4. Removal Action Report for Sauget Area 2: Site Q. E & E. July 29, 1994.

  5. Ecology and Environment, Inc., Final Federal On-scene Coordinator's Report for Area 2 Site Q, Cahokia, St. Clair County, Illinois, TDD S05-9909-015, July 31, 2000.

  6. Illinois EPA. Data Package for Samples Collected from Area 2. May 1999.

  7. Remedial Investigation for the Expanded Study Area, Sauget Illinois, Monsanto Company, Sauget, Illinois. Geraghty and Miller, Inc. August 1994.

  8. Ecological Risk Assessment for W. G. Krummrich Plant, Revision I, Sauget, St. Clair County, Illinois. Menzie-Cura and Associates, Inc. June 1, 2001.

  9. Remedial Investigation at Sauget Site R, Monsanto Company, Sauget, Illinois. Geraghty and Miller, Inc. August 1994.

  10. Conversation with Sandra Bron, Illinois EPA. September 12, 2002.

  11. Mecoprop (Chipco Turf Herb. MCPP) Herbicide Profile 12/88. USEPA Pesticide Fact Sheet, Fact Sheet # 192, December 1988.

  12. 2001 Illinois Annual Air Quality Report, Illinois EPA - Bureau of Air, Springfield, Illinois. August 2002.

  13. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Toxicology Profile for Arsenic. ATSDR. Atlanta, Ga., September 2000.

  14. USEPA Integrated Risk Information System, 2-(2-Methyl-4-chlorohphenoxy)propionic acid (MCPP) (CASRN 93-65-2), August 1, 1990.

CERTIFICATION

This Sauget Area 2 (Sites P, Q, R) public health assessment was prepared by the Illinois Department of Public Health under a cooperative agreement with the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). It was done in accordance with methodology and procedures approved when the public health assessment was begun.

W. Allen Robison
Technical Project Officer
Superfund Site Assessment Branch (SAAB)
Division of Health Assessment and Consultation (DAC)
ATSDR


The Division of Health Assessment and Consultation, ATSDR, has reviewed this public health assessment and concurs with its findings.

Roberta Erlwein
Chief, State Programs Section
SSAB, DHAC, ATSDR


Next Section     Table of Contents

  
 
USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, 4770 Buford Hwy NE, Atlanta, GA 30341
Contact CDC: 800-232-4636 / TTY: 888-232-6348

A-Z Index

  1. A
  2. B
  3. C
  4. D
  5. E
  6. F
  7. G
  8. H
  9. I
  10. J
  11. K
  12. L
  13. M
  14. N
  15. O
  16. P
  17. Q
  18. R
  19. S
  20. T
  21. U
  22. V
  23. W
  24. X
  25. Y
  26. Z
  27. #