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PUBLIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT

U.S. AIR FORCE TWIN CITIES RESERVE SMALL ARMS RANGE
(a/k/a MINNEAPOLIS ST. PAUL INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT AIR RESERVE STATION)
MINNEAPOLIS, HENNEPIN COUNTY, MINNESOTA


APPENDIX A
Closed IRP Sites
Site #/Name /Description Waste Disposal History Contaminated Media / Remedial Action Pathways:
Air (A)
Soil (S)
Water (W)
Status of Investigation
Site 2/Temporary landfill/ Located along bluff adjacent to Minnesota River. Used for approximately one month in 1965 while primary landfill was flooded. Waste consisted mainly of demolition debris and rubbish. No hazardous contamination detected / Demolition debris and rubbish removed All pathways eliminated from concern because possible contaminant source has been removed from site. No further action is required. MPCA Decision Document Oct 5, 1994.
Site 3/ Petroleum, oil and lubricant (POL) tank farm 143,000 gallons of JP-4 aviation fuel spilled into asphalt lined dike - most was recovered. Petroleum related VOCs were detected in soils and shallow ground water/ July 1983; in-situ vapor extraction system was installed and operated until November 1984 when VOCs were below cleanup levels. MPCA Decision Document Oct 5, 1994. All Pathways (A,S,W) eliminated from consideration. Contaminants of concern (COCs) found in soil and water samples were below the Soil Reference Levels (SRVs) and HRLs. Barr Engineering Co. , June 25,1992 Analytical Results for May 1992 Groundwater Samples at P-4 Site and Site 3. Response action and clean-up levels have been met therefore no further action is required. MPCA Decision Document Oct 5, 1994.
Site 6/ Reported fuel tank sludge buried in unknown area located near building 659. 150 gallons of fuel tank sludge, typically consisting of tank rust (millscale), sand, algae, water and some fuel reportedly buried. Investigations found no evidence of burial pit or its associated contaminants. All pathways are eliminated from consideration; potential source not found. No further action is required unless future construction activities in the area encounter the reported burial pit. MPCA Decision Document, Oct 5, 1994.
Site 8/ Hazardous waste storage area located on the northern perimeter of the MSP IAP ARS. Formerly used as an outdoor, hazardous waste, storage area. Reports of twenty-seven, 55 gallon drums filled with hazardous waste stored outside from 1981-1982 with no reports of leaking. Currently, the site is used as a nonhazardous storage area. Site soil sampling indicated the presence of aliphatic hydrocarbon-type oil, similar to engine oil, and lead. Site is not fenced/restricted beyond that of the installation property line. All Pathways (A,S,W) are eliminated from consideration. Contaminants of concern (COCs) found in soil and water samples were below the Soil Reference Levels (SRVs) and HRLs. No contaminants were detected at concentrations exceeding clean-up levels; therefore no further action is required. MPCA Decision Document Oct 5, 1994.
Site 9/ Battery Shop Leaching Pit in Building 614. Leaching pit was used for an unknown period of time for the disposal of neutralized battery acid (sulfuric acid). An estimated 25 gallons of acid were generated per year. Battery acid was neutralized with sodium carbonate before being dumped into a pit lined with crushed lime stone. All Pathways (A,S,W) eliminated from consideration (VOCs not present, Lead, Cadmium and Arsenic levels are below SRVs for unrestricted land use). No contaminants were detected at concentrations exceeding clean-up levels; therefore no further action required. MPCA Decision Document, Oct 5, 1994.
Site P-1/ Hanger P-1 area was reportedly used for the maintenance of military aircraft from 1945-1972. The site consists of two waste oil drum storage areas and a reported jet fuel spill area. Wastes generated at the hanger consisted of waste oils, aviation fuels, degreasers, and paint stripping wastes. A JP-4 fuel spill reportedly occurred near a storm sewer adjacent to the apron west of Hanger P-1. Two waste oil drum storage areas were suspected locations of chemical releases. Investigations of past JP-4 spill area revealed no contamination. At both drum storage areas, soil cadmium concentrations (Maximum of 10 ug/l) exceeded normal background concentrations. All Pathways (A,S,W) eliminated from consideration. No VOCs were detected, Cadmium concentrations are below SRV standards for unrestricted land use. The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency has determined that the cadmium concentrations present at the drum storage areas do not pose a threat to human health or environment. No further action required. MPCA Decision Document, Oct 5, 1994.
Site P-4/ At Building P-4, in 1984 a leaking underground, storage tank was found. An 8,000 gallon underground fuel oil tank had leaked No. 2 fuel into Building P-4 basement. The estimated release into the environment was 2,000-2,500 gallons. The tank has been replaced. A remedial investigation, concluded in 1991, determined that fuel oil contamination was present in both the soil and ground water at the site. A 10,000 gallon fiberglass heating fuel tank and 550 cubic yards of soil were removed in November 1991. The soil was land farmed (bioremediated) under the oversight of MPCA. Groundwater monitoring was conducted from January 1992 through September 1994. All Pathways (A,S,W) eliminated from consideration. Contaminated source removed (soil). Water samples were below the HRL's. Barr Engineering Co. , June 25,1992. Analytical Results for May 1992 Groundwater Samples at P-4 Site and Site 3. The selected response action for this site is No Further Action. MPCA Decision Document Feb 15 1995.
Museum Site/ This site is located along the north and east sides of the Air National Guard Museum Hanger. The Museum Hanger was operated as a maintenance hanger for C-97 aircraft from 1960-1971. Maintenance at the hanger generated waste oil which was occasionally spread for dust control on an automobile gravel parking lot on the east side of the hanger. Stoddard solvent reportedly leaked from a storage tank on the north side of the hanger. Two underground tanks (tank numbers 651, 652)along with VOC contaminated soil (1803 cubic yards) were excavated. Soil was thermally treated. (Minneapolis/St Paul International Airport Leaksites Summary January 3, 1997. ) Ground water was found to be contaminated with petroleum related VOCs. Air and soil pathways have been eliminated from consideration because soils have been remediated. Although groundwater is not a pathway under current conditions, benzene was detected up to 39ug/l and total BETX up to 919ug/l. No other VOCs were detected (MPCA Tanks and Spills Leak #6580 File). Regulatory oversight of the Museum Site has been transferred to the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA), Tanks and Spills Section (MPCA Decision Document Oct 5, 1994).
Former Rifle Range Site/ Outdoor rifle range is located along the Minnesota River, north of Interstate Highway 494. This site contains an area with a berm, where low fired bullets lodged, and a backstop/bluff where most of the bullets landed. The U. S. Army abandoned the rifle training range in 1969, but the U. S. Air Force still uses the site (backstop/bluff) for hand gun target practice. Investigations at the site revealed that the soil was found to be contaminated with lead. However, the lead concentrations were below clean-up levels established for unrestricted use, and to ensure that bare soil lead abatement standards are met. One foot of soil shall was placed over a former gravel road along the east side of the site. All Pathways (A,S,W) were eliminated from consideration. Contamination source removed (soil). Lead contaminated groundwater is not an issue. The bluff is still used as a backstop for the target range. With proper operation and maintenance, exposure to lead contaminated soils should not occur. The active pistol range precludes the need to remediate the bluff area. The active range is subject to closure under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. MPCA Decision Document, Feb 15 1995.
Former Indoor Firing Range Site / This site was operated in a building that no longer exists. The range was located in the basement of a building located approximately 250 feet north of Military Highway and 125 feet west of Earhart Avenue. The indoor firing range was operated from 1943-1977. The back stop of the range incorporated a sand-trap where spent bullets accumulated, thereby contaminating the sand with lead. Lead contaminated sand/ The building where the firing range was located was imploded and covered with fill. The sand-trap was located later and contaminated sand was removed. All pathways (A,S,W) were eliminated from consideration, contaminated sand removed and disposed of off site at a RCRA Transfer Station and Disposal Facility. No further action is required at the Former Indoor Firing Range Site. MPCA Decision Document Oct 5, 1994.
Transformer Storage Site \ This site is located on the northern portion of the International Airport complex between buildings 720 and 721 in the northeastern portion of the base. The site has been used to store general salvage materials from base operations, prior to shipment off-base for disposal. In September 1988, a base employee reported having witnessed the disposal of oil from four or five transformers onto the ground in the mid 1970s. Tests showed no detectable PCB contamination. The site was not part of the IRP area of concern. All pathways (A,S,W) eliminated from consideration, potential source not found. Based on the Air Force investigation it was determined that no further action shall be required.
Wp-15 Site (Suspected Battery Shop Leaching Pit)\ is located in a building (810) that no longer exists. Reportedly, the southern portion of building 810 contained a battery leaching pit and an area to store batteries and pesticides. The exact location of the leaching pit is not known. The building was demolished. Test results of soil concentrations revealed low concentrations of pesticides and background levels of lead. The area is covered with new construction of an addition to building 813. All pathways (A,S,W) were eliminated from consideration. Suspected battery leaching pit was not located and all soil samples were below detection limits for pesticide parameters. Ground water was not sampled at this site. No further action required.



APPENDIX B

The following section is not available in electronic format to conversion to HTML at the time of preparation of this document. To obtain a hard copy of the document, please contact:

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry
Division of Health Assessment and Consultation
Attn: Chief, Program Evaluation, Records, and Information Services Branch,
E-56
1600 Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, Georgia 30333


APPENDIX C

Geological Conditions at Site 7

This section is a technical description of the hydro geological conditions at site 7 and its influence on theJP-4 Spill Site. The impacted aquifer is composed of unconsolidated sand and the Platteville Limestone. The depth to the water table in the area is approximately 20 feet, which is also nearly the depth to the topof the Platteville Limestone. As a result, much of the contaminated groundwater flow is in the PlattevilleLimestone and the three pump-out wells control the movement of contaminated water from Site 7. Themovement of groundwater in limestone is often controlled by solution enhanced cracks that result fromjoints (vertical breaks in the rock due to regional tectonic pressure) and fractures. Groundwater movesthrough these small aperture, vertical planes between blocks of unaltered limestone and the natural acids inthe groundwater dissolve the limestone and create vertical planes of preferential flow. The orientation ofthese planes have the same orientation as the regional jointing pattern. In the Twin Cities area, jointing isprimarily northeast to southwest with a minor joint set oriented northwest to southeast.

The Site 7 pump-out system appears to be connected to a linear zone of high permeability in the Plattevillelimestone that extends northeast from the area of Site 7 to just west of the JP-4 Spill Site. This zone ofhigh permeability is evident from the water levels collected May 21-22, 1995 at both sites. Figure C-1shows that there is a strong difference in the hydraulic gradient in the area.

There is an area northwest of the pumping center with very high hydraulic gradients that appears to beoriented northeast to southwest. This suggests the pumping wells are located in an area of higherhydraulic conductivity that may have a northeast to southwest orientation.

The groundwater elevations in the Platteville limestone at the JP-4 site,(Figure C-2) shows that flow in thePlatteville is to the northwest. Figure C-3 shows the groundwater contours using the data from both Site7 and the JP-4 Site that were collected on May 21-22, 1995. When contouring the complete data set the804 and 806 contours extend northeast from Site 7 to the JP-4 Spill Site. These suggest that the pump-out system is intercepting water from a relatively large area and could be influencing flow in the Plattevilleat considerable distances from Site 7.

Shutting down the pump-out system at Site 7 will have a substantial but unknown effect on thegroundwater flow patterns in the area. The many groundwater contours maps in the Site 7 AnnualMonitoring Reports demonstrate that the pump-out system has had a substantial effect on the groundwater levels in the area, dropping groundwater elevations in excess of 10 feet over an area of severalacres. The pumping records themselves also suggest that the pump-out system have had a significantimpact on the groundwater flow in the area. The pump-out wells yield a combined 14 million gallons peryear, which is a very high sustained pumping rate for the Platteville limestone, and likely to be influencinga large area of the aquifer. Groundwater flows at Sites 7 do not appear to have been fully characterized. For example, Figure C-4 purports to represent the groundwater flow contours for non-pumpingconditions, but appears to show a cone of depression in the vicinity of the pumping wells. This suggeststhat the aquifer had not completely recovered from the long term pumping at the time that these waterlevels were collected and that the ambient flow direction in the Platteville and the drift aquifers may not beknown.

Ambient groundwater flow is presented in the Figure C-5 and suggests that ambient surficial flow may beto the northwest and opposite the groundwater flow direction of Figure C-4. Figure C-6 shows that groundwater flow in the Platteville limestone is southeasterly, although this mapwas generated with data from only four wells. Given this information, determining the fate of thecontaminated groundwater in the Site 7 area after the pump-out system is turned off will require continued monitoring.


Figure C-1. Platteville Potentiometric Contour Map


Figure C-2. Platteville Potentiometric Surface (3/21 - 3/22/95) JP-4 Spill Site


Figure C-3. Platteville Potentiometric Surface Site 7 and JP-4 Spill Site (3/21 - 3/22/95)


Figure C-4. Groundwater Contour Map - Non Pumping Conditions Site 7 (8-19-96)


Figure C-5. Potentiometric Surface Map Site 7 - Sand and Gravel Zone (3/28/88)


Figure C-6. Potentiometric Surface Map -- Platteville Aquifer Site 7 (3/29/88)


Figure C-7. Water Table Contour Map



APPENDIX D

The following section is not available in electronic format to conversion to HTML at the time of preparation of this document. To obtain a hard copy of the document, please contact:

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry
Division of Health Assessment and Consultation
Attn: Chief, Program Evaluation, Records, and Information Services Branch,
E-56
1600 Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, Georgia 30333


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