Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to site content

PUBLIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT

KERR-MCGEE REFINERY SITE
CUSHING, PAYNE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA


APPENDICES

Appendix A--Site Map

Figure 1
Figure 1. Site Map



Appendix B--Thorium or Uranium Wastes Disposition

Disposition of thorium or uranium wastes from past operations has been addressed by a noticepublished by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 46 FR 52061 (October 23, 1981),which discusses options for NRC approval of those actions. The options are administered by theUranium Fuel Licensing Branch, Division of Fuel Cycle and Material Safety, Office of NuclearMaterial Safety and Safeguards. The notice includes the following tabular information:

Summary of Maximum Concentrations

Permitted under Disposition Options
(in picocuries per gram--Ci/gm)
Kind of Material Options
BTP* 11BTP 22
Natural Thorium (Th-232+Th-228) withdaughters present and in equilibrium1050
Natural Uranium (U-238+U-234) withdaughters present and in equilibrium1040
Depleted Uranium
        Soluble
        Insoluble

35
35

100
300
Enriched Uranium:
        Soluble
        Insoluble

30
30

100
250
        1 Based on EPA cleanup standards.
        2 Concentrations based on limiting individual doses to 170 mrem/yr.

        * Branch Technical Position




Appendix C--Investigations and Contaminant Tables

Investigation and related site information were reviewed, and an initial selection was made of contaminants that warrant additional evaluation for deciding (in Public Health ImplicationsSection, beginning on Page 14) whether exposure to them has public health significance. Thus,discussion of the contaminants chosen here, does not imply that human exposure has occurred orthat exposure would actually result in adverse health effects. The contaminants selected arepresented in Tables C1 - C17, in this Appendix, beginning on Page 52.

Initial contaminant selection considered the following factors:

  • Concentrations of contaminants on and off the site.
  • Field data quality, laboratory data quality, and sample design.
  • Relationship of concentrations to ATSDR's selection comparison values or the unavailability of suitable comparison values.
  • Concentrations in soils in the Western United States, and
  • Community health concerns.

In constructing Tables C1 - C17, most contaminants that were selected by the preceding criteriain one medium were also included in every other relevant media table. The data tables includeselection comparison value information where pertinent, including:

  • Environmental Media Evaluation Guides (EMEGs), which are levels established by ATSDR that are considered to be protective to human health against noncarcinogenic effects for a chronic exposure of a specific sub-population. Intermediate EMEGs (IEMEGs) are established for less than chronic exposure durations.
  • Cancer Risk Evaluation Guides (CREGs) are estimated contaminant concentrations that are based on one excess cancer in a million persons being exposed over a lifetime and are derived from EPA cancer slope factors using ATSDR exposure factors, body weights and exposure duration assumptions.
  • Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) represent contaminant concentrations that EPA deems to be protective of human health (considering the availability and economics of water treatment technology) over a lifetime (70 years) at an exposure rate of 2 liters per day.
  • EPA's Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) is a drinking water health goal. EPA believes that the MCLG represents a level that no known or anticipated adverse health effect on the health of persons should occur; this allows an adequate margin of safety.
  • Proposed Maximum Contaminant Level Goals (PMCLGs) are MCLGs that are being proposed.
  • Reference Dose (RfD) and Reference Concentration (RfC)evaluation guides--called RMEGs-- use EPA's estimates of the daily exposure to a contaminant that is unlikely to cause noncarcinogenic health effects.
  • Lifetime Health Advisories are estimates for drinking water for which adverse noncarcinogenic health effects would not be anticipated.
  • For radionuclides, the Annual Limit of Intake (ALI) is recommended for occupationaldose. Currently, no enforceable standards exist for radiological contamination in soils ata site such as this. The ALI for workers is the amount of radioactive materials eitheringested or inhaled, imparting a dose of 2 rem per year. The current dose-limitingguidelines state that a member of the public should not receive more than 100 milliremper year above background, excluding medical procedures. Drinking water MCLs forradionuclides limit the radiation dose from the drinking water pathway to 4 mrem peryear from beta and photon emitting radionuclides.

The EPA Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) also was searched to determine whether itcontained information about industrial chemical releases for the area. None of the releaseinformation identified in the inventory is pertinent to these evaluations (29).

A. On-site Investigation Data

On-site information described in this subsection was gathered during the followinginvestigations programs:

  • The EPA's Field Investigation Team (FIT) Site Assessment, conducted by Ecology& Environment in May, 1986 to characterize contaminants in Pits 1 - 4, in the local groundwater, and in the local tributary to Skull Creek (1).
  • The Kerr-McGee investigation conducted in September, 1987 to characterize contaminants in Pit 5 and Skull Creek (1).
  • The EPA's Technical Assistance Team (TAT) investigation conducted in May, 1988 to characterize Pit 5 (1).
  • The Kerr-McGee sampling of 41 monitoring wells at the site in March, 1990 to assess contamination of local groundwater (1).
  • The Draft Phase I Remedial Investigation Report for non-radiological contamination at Kerr-McGee Cushing Refinery (5).
  • The Final Phase I Remedial Investigation Report for non-radiological contamination at Kerr-McGee Cushing Refinery (9).
  • Kerr-McGee's Radiological Survey of three private properties formerly used for Uranium and Thorium processing operations, conducted in November, 1989 (Document title in Reference section) (10).
  • The Kerr-McGee Radiological Characterization of the Cushing Refinery Site, conducted in May, 1991 (11).
  • The EPA's Technical Assistance Team (TAT) investigation conducted in March, 1988 principally to characterize Property A (3) .
  • A Kerr-McGee radiation survey of four large unaffected on-site areas conducted in 1994 (12).
  • A Kerr-McGee analysis of environmental gamma dose via dosimeters and air sampling conducted in 1994 (30).
  • A Kerr-McGee analysis of hydrocarbon wastes at 21 locations conducted in 1994 (6).

Waste Material

During the May, 1986 sampling conducted by FIT one sludge sample was taken from each ofPits 1 -4. The samples were split, EPA possessing one set of the samples and Kerr-McGee theother. Chromium exceeded its ATSDR comparison values only for the child who habituallyingests soil-like materials. The following organic contaminants were detected and have nocomparison value: benzo(a)anthracene, 2-hexanone, 2-methylnaphthalene, chrysene, andphenanthrene. Lead and potassium were also detected and do not have a comparison value. Thecontaminants and concentration ranges are listed in Table C1.

During the September, 1987 sampling conducted by Kerr-McGee two sludge samples were takenfrom Pit 5. No contaminants exceeded ATSDR comparison values. The following organiccontaminants were detected but have no ATSDR comparison values: benzo(a)-anthracene andchrysene. During this sampling event, Kerr-McGee did not analyze for inorganic contaminants(Table C1).

During the May, 1988 sampling conducted by TAT nine sludge samples were taken from Pit 5. None of the organic contaminants sampled exceed ATSDR comparison values. The followinginorganic contaminants were detected at levels which exceeded ATSDR comparison values: arsenic, cadmium, and chromium. There is no comparison value for lead, mercury, or vanadium(Table C1). Cadmium and chromium concentrations exceed only the values for the child whohabitually ingests soil-like materials.

During the 1990-92 sampling performed for the Remedial Investigation Report (RIR), each pitwas spot tested for field Ph and acidity and Pit 3 was also tested for ignitability. Deep sampleswere taken from the waste material sludge in Pits 1, 2, 4, and 5 for total chemical analysis. Thefollowing constituents exceeded ATSDR comparison values: antimony, arsenic, barium,beryllium, cadmium and manganese. There is no comparison value for chrysene, copper, lead,2-methylnaphthalene, phenanthrene and vanadium. Antimony, barium, cadmium, chromium,and manganese exceed only comparison values for the child who habitually ingests soil-likematerials (Table C1).

During the May, 1986 sampling conducted by FIT one sludge sample was taken from each ofPits 1 -4 and analyzed for radioactive contaminants. The following radioactive contaminantswere detected above national background levels: radium-226 (surface), radium-228 (oral),thorium-232 (surface), thorium-230 (surface), thorium-228 (surface), thorium-227 (surface), andlead-210 (oral and surface). Other radionuclides analyzed for included uranium-233,234 andpolonium-210 (Table C2).

During the May, 1991 sampling conducted by Kerr-McGee, 20 samples were collected from Pit4 (10 random and 10 biased radioactive "hot spots"), 15 samples from Pits 1, 2, and 3, and 12samples in Pit 5 to determine radioactive contamination present at the Kerr-McGee Cushingrefinery. The following radioactive contaminants were detected at levels above background: thorium-232 (surface), gross gamma exposure (surface) and total uranium (Table C2).

In September, 1944, Kerr-McGee sampled 21 hydrocarbon waste deposits, which are smallerthan Pits 1 - 5; deposit locations were identified by examining aerial photographs and by othersite activities (Table C1). The following inorganic and organic contaminants were found atlevels that exceed ATSDR comparison values: antimony, arsenic, barium, benzo(a)pyrene,beryllium, cadmium, chromium, manganese, nickel, silver, and zinc. There are no comparisonvalues for aluminum, benzo(a)anthracene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(ghi)perlene, calcium,cobalt, copper, dibenzofuran, iron, lead, magnesium, mercury, 2-methylnaphthalene,naphthalene, phenanthrene, potassium, and sodium. Chromium, pyrene, silver, and zinc exceedonly comparison values for the child who habitually ingests soil-like materials. Barium,cadmium, manganese, and nickel exceed comparison values for all children.

Soil

During the May, 1986 sampling conducted by FIT eight soil samples were taken, at an unstateddepth. Locations of the samples are described as low concentration soil samples taken fromnorth, south and west of Pit 4, low concentration samples taken south of the north fence line in an old tank area, low concentration sample taken from a ponding area south of Pits 1,2 and 3, and a low concentration sample taken near an above ground tank area north of the southboundary. The samples were split, EPA possessing one set of the samples and Kerr-McGee theother. The following organic contaminants were detected but have no comparison value:chrysene, 2-hexanone, and phenanthrene. N-nitrosodiphenylamine levels exceeded the ATSDRcomparison value. The following inorganic contaminants were detected at levels which exceedATSDR comparison values: arsenic, chromium, nickel, and zinc (Table C3). Calcium, cobalt,copper, iron, lead, and mercury do not have comparison values. The concentrations ofchromium and nickel exceed only the comparison value for the child who habitually ingests soil-like materials.

During the May, 1988 sampling conducted by TAT six soil samples from an unstated depth weretaken. The samples were split, EPA possessing one set of the samples and Kerr-McGee theother. This site assessment did not detect any organic contaminants at levels which exceedATSDR comparison values. The following inorganic contaminants were detected at levelswhich exceed ATSDR comparison values: arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, manganese,and nickel (Table C3). Copper and iron do not have comparison values. Of these inorganiccontaminants, concentrations of barium, cadmium, chromium, manganese, and nickel exceedonly the comparison value for the child who habitually ingests soil-like materials.

During the 1990 to 1992 sampling for the remedial investigation report, several samples of soiland rock were taken (depth unstated). Inorganic contaminants that were detected at levels thatexceed ATSDR comparison values include: arsenic, barium, beryllium, chromium, manganese,and nickel (Table C3). Of these, barium, chromium, manganese, and nickel exceed only thecomparison value for the child who habitually ingests soil-like materials. Calcium, cobalt,copper, iron, lead, were elevated, but do not have comparison values. Analyses for VOCs andSVOCs showed only ethylbenzene (not listed in Table C3) was detected at a very lowconcentration.

During the May, 1986 sampling conducted by FIT eight soil samples were taken at unstateddepths from the Kerr-McGee site and analyzed for radioactive contaminants. The followingradioactive contaminants were detected at elevated levels: radium-226, uranium-233, and -234,uranium-235, thorium-232, natural thorium, thorium-230, thorium-228, thorium-227, and lead-210. Samples also were analyzed for radium-228 and polonium-210 (Table C2). Backgroundconcentrations of radium-226/228, uranium-234/238 and thorium-232 radionuclides are typically1-4 pCi/g. The typical background for uranium-235 is about 0.02 pCi/g. Those radionuclidesthat are decay products of uranium and thorium have the same general values if the soils areundisturbed; these include, but are not limited to, Pb-210, Th-230/228, Po-210, Bi-214, and Pb-214. Background levels of gamma radiation are not as standard, as they are dependent onaltitude and geology. A rule of thumb is that background gamma radiation levels are on theorder of 30 µR/h or less.

During the November, 1989 sampling conducted by Kerr-McGee twelve soil samples werecollected. The following radioactive contaminants were detected at elevated levels: radium-226, uranium-238, thorium-232, and gross gamma in and around the former uranium/thoriumprocessing buildings. These were the only radioactive contaminants analyzed for in thisinvestigation (Table C2).

During the May, 1991 sampling conducted by Kerr-McGee approximately 200 soil samples werecollected for radiologic analyses. Soil samples indicated that the following radioactivecontaminants were present above background values: uranium-233 and -234, uranium-235,uranium-238, thorium-232. Radium-226 was analyzed for in some isolated samples and theuranium isotopic composition was used to determine the percent of enriched uranium present. These samples were from various depths and were collected from excavations of trench areasand other "hot spots" identified in the gamma survey (Table C2).

As part of the site decommissioning process, analyses was reported in 1994 for about 40 soilsamples taken in each of four large segments of the property used for oil refining and storageactivities (Table C2). For comparison purposes, background levels also are shown in that tablefor soil sampled off-site. Each of the locations where abnormal values were recorded will beremediated.

Sediment

During the May, 1986 sampling conducted by FIT six sediment samples were taken from SkullCreek or its tributaries, three of which were on-site samples (Table C4). The samples were split,EPA possessing one set of the samples and Kerr-McGee the other. The following inorganiccontaminants were detected at levels which exceed ATSDR comparison values: barium,chromium, and manganese. Their concentrations exceed only the comparison value for the childwho habitually ingests soil-like materials. Lead does not have a comparison value.Benzo(a)pyrene was the only organic compound that exceeded ATSDR comparison values. Thefollowing organic contaminants were detected and have no comparison value: cyclohexanes(several); cyclopropane, 1-methyl-2-(methylp); dimethyl decane; dimethyl heptane; hexane, 2,2-dimethyl; hexanol, 3-methyl; isoctanol; oxirane, 2-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-3-ethyl; pentane, 2,3-dimethyl; 1-pentene, 2,4-dimethyl; trichloropropylene; and trimethyl pentane.

During the September, 1987 sampling conducted by Kerr-McGee three sediment samples weretaken to assess the sediments located in Skull Creek near Pit 5 (Table C4). No inorganiccontaminants were analyzed. Chrysene and naphthalene are the only organic contaminantswhich were detected that do not have an ATSDR comparison value. Other detected organiccontaminants do not exceed a comparison value.

During the March 1988 sampling conducted by TAT for evaluation of Property A, one sedimentsample was taken from Skull Creek within the eastern Kerr-McGee boundary (Table C14). Thefollowing inorganic contaminants were detected at levels which exceed ATSDR comparisonvalues: arsenic, barium, beryllium, chromium, and manganese. Calcium, cobalt, copper, lead,and vanadium have no comparison values. Barium, chromium, and manganese exceed onlythose comparison values for the child who habitually ingests soil-like materials.

During the May, 1988 sampling conducted by TAT four sediment samples were taken fromSkull Creek near Pit 5. The samples were split, EPA possessing one set of the samples and Kerr-McGee the other. The following inorganic contaminants were detected at levels which exceedATSDR comparison values: antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, andmanganese (Table C4). Cobalt, copper, lead, mercury, and vanadium have no comparisonvalues. No organic contaminants were detected. Antimony, barium, cadmium, chromium, andmanganese exceed only those comparison values for the child who habitually ingests soil-likematerials.

During the 1992 sampling for the RIR seven sediment samples were collected on-site. Forsamples taken from tributaries near Pits 1, 2, 3, and 4, arsenic, barium, beryllium, chromium,and manganese were detected at levels that exceed ATSDR comparison values (Table C4). There is no comparison value for cobalt, copper, iron, lead, and vanadium. Chrysene and alsobenzo(ghi)perylene (which is not listed on Table C4) were detected at a very low levels and haveno comparison value. Barium, chromium, and manganese exceed comparison values for thechild who habitually consumes soil-like materials. For samples taken on site from Skull Creek(including some taken adjacent to Pit 5), arsenic, barium, beryllium, chromium, and manganesewere detected at levels that exceed ATSDR comparison values. There is no comparison valuefor calcium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, magnesium, mercury, and vanadium. Chrysene andphenanthrene were detected at very low levels and have no comparison values. Barium andchromium exceed comparison values for the child that habitually consumes soil-like materials,while manganese levels exceed ATSDR comparison values established for all children.

During the May, 1986 sampling conducted by FIT three sediment samples were taken from theKerr-McGee site and analyzed for radioactive contaminants. The following radioactivecontaminants were detected: radium-226, thorium-228, and lead-210 (Table C2). ATSDR is notaware of a substantive body of information about background radionuclide concentrations instream or river sediment. It is reasonable to believe concentrations are similar to backgroundlevels in soils (described earlier in this section) although solutioning is likely to result insomewhat lower levels for certain nuclides.

During the November, 1989 sampling conducted by Kerr-McGee two sediment samples werecollected. Radium-226 and thorium-232 were detected (Table C2).

During the May, 1991 sampling conducted by Kerr-McGee 12 sediment samples were collectedfrom 4 locations in Skull Creek for radioanalysis. Sediment samples indicated that the followingradioactive contaminants are present: thorium-232, and gamma exposure along the creek banks(Table C2).

Groundwater - Monitoring Wells

In March, 1990 Kerr-McGee sampled 41 monitoring wells on the property. FIT sampled 9monitoring wells that are located on the site near the waste pits in 1986. The followinginorganic contaminants from the 1990 sampling event were detected at levels which exceedATSDR comparison values: arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese,mercury, and nickel. Aluminum, calcium, cobalt, iron, magnesium, potassium, sodium, andvanadium have no comparison values. The levels of barium, chromium, manganese, nickel, andvanadium exceed the comparison values established for both children. The following organiccontaminants were detected in the 1990 sampling at levels which exceed ATSDR comparisonvalues: benzene, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, and naphthalene (Table C5). 2-Methylnaphthalenewas also detected but does not have a comparison value.

In 1990-92 extensive sampling was conducted for the RIR. The following inorganiccontaminants were detected at levels which exceed ATSDR comparison values: antimony,arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, nickel, and selenium. Calcium,cobalt, magnesium, potassium, and sodium were detected at elevated concentrations but do nothave comparison values. Organic contaminants detected which exceed ATSDR comparisonvalues include: benz(a)anthracene, benz(a)pyrene, bromodichloromethane, chrysene, andnaphthalene. 2-Hexanone and 2-methylnaphthalene were also detected but do not havecomparison values (Table C5). The levels of antimony, cadmium, chromium, manganese,nickel, and vanadium exceed the comparison values established for both children and adults. The 1990-92 sampling also indicated elevated levels of sulfates (22.1-9,190 mg/L) in thegroundwater monitoring wells. The Vamoosa-Ada Aquifer had maximum sulfate levels of 393mg/L. These are very close to and exceed the EPA Proposed Maximum Contaminant Levels forsulfate.

In May, 1986, FIT sampled 9 monitoring wells that are located on the site near the waste pits;the following radioactive contaminants were detected: radium-226, radium-228, uranium-233and -234, uranium-235, uranium-238, thorium-228, lead-210, and polonium-210 (Table C6) The concentrations of radionuclides in monitoring wells are well below the proposed MCLs. Inan 1991 EPA survey as reported in the Federal Register, approximately 72% of the sites haduranium levels above 0.1 pCi/L and 70% of those sites had levels between 0.1 and 20 pCi/L(31).

Surface Water

During the May, 1986 sampling conducted by FIT two of the five surface water samples weretaken from on-site locations. The samples were split, EPA possessing one set of the samples andKerr-McGee the other. The only organic contaminant detected at a level which exceeds anATSDR comparison value (derived for drinking water) is bis (2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate. Thefollowing inorganic contaminants were detected at levels which exceed ATSDR drinking watercomparison values: arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, and selenium(Table C7). Calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and sodium do not have comparison values.

During the September, 1987 sampling conducted by Kerr-McGee three on-site surface watersamples were taken and sampled for organic contaminants. Benzene, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate,and trichloroethylene were detected at levels which exceed ATSDR comparison values (derivedfor drinking water)(Table C7).

During the March, 1988 sampling conducted by TAT to characterize Property A off site, onesurface water sample also was collected onsite in Skull Creek near the eastern boundary of theKerr Mc-Gee property (Table C7). Manganese was detected at levels which exceed ATSDRcomparison values (derived for drinking water) (Table C7).

During the May, 1988 sampling conducted by TAT four surface water samples were taken fromon-site locations and analyzed for organic contaminants. The samples were split, EPApossessing one set of the samples and Kerr-McGee the other. Benzene, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, and bromodichloromethane were detected at levels which exceed ATSDRcomparison values (derived for drinking water) (Table C7).

Surface water samples were collected for the 1990-92 RIR. For samples taken from creektributaries near Pits 1, 2, 3, and 4, inorganic contaminants detected at levels that exceed ATSDRcomparison values include: antimony (for child and adult), beryllium, chromium, manganese(for child and adult), nickel, and vanadium. Aluminum, calcium, cobalt, iron, magnesium,potassium, and sodium were also detected at elevated concentrations but do not have comparisonvalues. Organic contaminants that exceed comparison values include: benzo(a)pyrene,benzo(a)anthracene, and N-nitrosodiphenylamine. Phenanthrene was also detected but do nothave comparison values (Table C7). Samples taken on site in Skull Creek, (including samplesadjacent to Pit 5) showed concentrations were less than found in the tributaries (possibly due to dilution effects of creek flow). Magnesium and sodium are slightly elevated but do not have a comparison value. 2-Methylnaphthalene and a few other organic compounds not shown in TableC7 were detected at low concentrations for which there are no comparison values.

Air

Kerr-McGee conducted ambient air particulate sampling on site in 1994 to evaluate gamma doselevels via that medium (Table C2). The sampling results suggest that the values recorded wereat acceptable levels.

Environmental/Dosimeter

In 1994, Kerr-McGee placed thermoluminecent dosimeters at multiple locations onsite,including along on fences surrounding some Radioactive Materials Areas. (Table C2). Theenvironmental gamma dose recorded was at acceptable levels.

B. Off-site Investigation Data

The data presented in this subsection were collected during the following site investigations:

  • The EPA's Field Investigation Team (FIT) Site Assessment, conducted by Ecology& Environment in May, 1986 to characterize contaminants in Pits 1 - 4, in the local groundwater, and in the local tributary to Skull Creek (1).
  • The Kerr-McGee investigation conducted in September, 1987 to characterize contaminants in Pit 5 and Skull Creek (1).
  • The EPA's Technical Assistance Team (TAT) investigation conducted in May, 1988 to characterize Pit 5 (1).
  • The EPA's TAT investigation conducted in March, 1988 to characterize contamination on Property A directly east of the Kerr-McGee northeastern boundary (3) .
  • The Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality investigation of soils and radioactivity levels conducted in 1995 at the Deep Rock School, located to the east of the southeast part of the Kerr-McGee property (32)
  • The EPA's Field Investigation Team (FIT) Groundwater Characterization, conducted in September and October, 1989 (1).
  • The Oklahoma Department of Health's Private Well and Pond Sampling conducted by the Payne County Health Department near the Kerr-McGee Cushing Refinery, conducted from October, 1989 through April, 1990 (33).
  • Municipal well sampling conducted in October, 1989 by Kerr-McGee to analyze municipal well water quality. Reported in Comments of Kerr-McGee Corporation in Response to EPA's Proposed Listing of the Cushing, Oklahoma Site (34).
  • The Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality transmittal of public water supply data for sampling conducted in 1994 and 1995 (35)
  • The Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality's sampling of a private well in July, 1995 (36)
  • A Kerr-McGee radiation survey of four large unaffected on-site areas conducted in 1994 (12).
  • A joint Kerr-McGee and ODEQ sampling program in 1995 that included streamsediment and water, soil and a private well east of Linwood Avenue between Deep RockRoad and Property A. (37)(38)(39)(40)

Sludge

During the March, 1988 sampling conducted by TAT to characterize off-site sludges on PropertyA, located east of the Kerr-McGee northeastern boundary (Figure 1), five sludge samples weretaken. Sludges there are believed to result from the former refinery operations conducted on thatproperty. Analysis of the samples indicated the presence of the following inorganiccontaminants at levels which exceed ATSDR comparison values only for children that habituallyingest soil-like materials: barium, manganese, and silver (Table C8). Chromium exceeded thecomparison values for all children. Copper, iron, lead, and sodium do not have comparisonvalues. Samples were analyzed for VOCs, SVOCs, and other organic compounds; none werementioned in the data report. No radionuclide analyses were performed. Contaminants found insludge are most likely associated with former refinery operations conducted on that property.

Soil

During the March, 1988 sampling conducted by TAT to characterize off-site soils on PropertyA, several soil samples were taken. Contaminants found in soil there are likely to be the resultof former refinery operations on the property and background soil conditions. Analysis of thesamples indicated the presence of the following inorganic contaminants at levels which exceedATSDR comparison values: antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium,manganese, and zinc (Table C9). No ATSDR comparison value is available for calcium, cobalt,copper, iron, lead, mercury, thallium, and vanadium in soil. Antimony, barium, cadmium,chromium, manganese, and zinc exceed the comparison value for children who habituallyconsume soil-like materials. Samples were analyzed for VOCs, SVOCs, and other organiccompounds. The source document reports that unidentified semivolatiles were detected in soilsbut does not identify concentration or state whether they were found in sample(s) on or offProperty A.

During that same sampling event, one sample was taken on residential property immediatelynorth of Property A. Contaminants found on that property might be the result of aerialdeposition from former industrial activities on Property A or Kerr-McGee properties or frombackground conditions. Analysis showed the presence of the following inorganic contaminantsat levels which exceed ATSDR comparison values: arsenic, barium, chromium, and manganese(Table C9). No ATSDR comparison value is available for lead and mercury in soil. Barium,chromium, and manganese exceeded the comparison value for children who habitually consumesoil-like materials. Samples were analyzed for VOCs, SVOCs, and other organic compounds. The source document reports that unidentified SVOCs were detected in soils but does notidentify concentration or state whether they were found in sample(s) on or off Property A.

Samples also were taken in 1995 at the Deep Rock School, located on the east side of LinwoodAvenue, near Kerr-McGee's southeast property boundary (Table C9). Contaminants there arelikely to result from background conditions. Analysis of the samples showed that barium andchromium slightly exceeded comparison values only for children who habitually ingest soil-likematerials. No ATSDR comparison value is available for lead in soil. Samples were analyzed forVOCs and SVOCs; none were detected. A radioactivity survey on school property yieldedreadings between 10 and 15 microRoengtens per hour; background levels were 10microRoengtens per hour--these values indicate there are no substantive radioactive levels on the school property.

In 1995, several samples were taken of soil on a large property south of Property A, by DeepRock Road, that has a residence and analyzed for radioactivity (Table C9). One sample was bythe house, the others were by Skull Creek. Results show no evidence of elevated radioactivity.

Investigation in 1994 by Kerr-McGee for the final radiation survey of four large areas used foroil refining and storage activities on site included results for 54 background samples taken offsite; most were taken near the west property line, but all within ½ mile of the property. Thosedata have been included in Table C2 to provide a convenient comparison with results for on-sitesoils. Typically, ATSDR finds that background concentrations of radium-226/228, uranium-234/238 and thorium-232 radionuclides are on the order of 1-4 pCi/g. The typical backgroundfor uranium-235 is about 0.02 pCi/g. Those radionuclides that are decay products of uraniumand thorium have the same general values if the soils are undisturbed; these include, but are notlimited to, Pb-210, Th-230/228, Po-210, Bi-214, and Pb-214. Background levels of gammaradiation are not as standard, as they are dependent on altitude and geology. A rule of thumb isthat background gamma radiation levels are on the order of 30 µR/h or less.

Sediment

During the May, 1986 sampling conducted by FIT six sediment samples were taken, three ofwhich were off-site samples. Contaminants found are likely to result from former operations onKerr-McGee property and from background conditions The following inorganic contaminantswere detected at levels which exceed ATSDR comparison values: arsenic, chromium, andmanganese. Cobalt, iron, and lead do not have comparison values. Chromium and manganeseexceed the comparison value for children that habitually consume soil-like materials. Benzo(a)pyrene was the only organic contaminant detected which does have an ATSDRcomparison value (Table C10).

During the March, 1988 sampling conducted by TAT, two sediment samples were collected inSkull Creek and a tributary near Property A, downstream of the Kerr Mc-Gee property. Thecontaminants found are likely to result in part from former activities at Kerr-McGee andProperty A and from background conditions. The following inorganic contaminants weredetected at levels which exceed ATSDR comparison values: arsenic, barium, beryllium,chromium, and manganese (Table C10). Cobalt, copper, iron, lead, mercury, and vanadium donot have comparison values. Barium an manganese exceed the ATSDR comparison value onlyfor children who habitually ingest soil-like materials. Samples were analyzed for VOCs,SVOCs, and other organic compounds. The source document reports that unidentified SVOCswere detected in sediment but does not identify location or concentration.

During the March, 1988 sampling conducted by TAT to characterize Property A, severalsediment samples were collected in drainage courses and in a pond on the property. Thecontaminants found are likely to result from former refinery activities on the property and \frombackground conditions. The following inorganic contaminants were detected at levels whichexceed ATSDR comparison values: arsenic, barium, beryllium, chromium, manganese, mercury,and zinc (Table C10). Cobalt, copper, iron, lead, mercury, and vanadium do not havecomparison values. Barium, chromium, manganese, mercury, and zinc exceed the ATSDRcomparison value only for children who habitually ingest soil-like materials. The sourcedocument reports that unidentified SVOCs were detected in sediment but does not identifylocation or concentration.

In December, 1995 two sediment samples were taken from Skull Creek and a tributary downstream of the site by a team of Kerr-McGee and ODEQ personnel who split most of thesamples. Some of the contaminants found may result from refinery operations on either Kerr-McGee or Property A. The following inorganic contaminants were detected at levels whichexceed ATSDR comparison values: antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, chromium, andmanganese (Table C10). Aluminum, calcium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, magnesium, mercury,potassium, sodium, and vanadium do not have comparison values. Barium, chromium, andmanganese exceed the ATSDR comparison values only for children who habitually ingest soil-like material. Twenty-three common organic chemicals were detected. Fifteen of those haveATSDR comparison values; none of the comparison values were exceeded. The remaining 8contaminants have no comparison values. Information about organic analyses is summarized ina note at the end of Table C10. Radiologic analyses of creek sediments showed values that wereat background levels (see note at end of Table C11).

During the May, 1986 sampling conducted by FIT three sediment samples were taken fromSkull Creek and tributaries, up and down stream of the site, and analyzed for radioactivecontaminants. The following radioactive contaminants were detected: radium-226, thorium-228, and lead-210 (Table C11). ATSDR is not aware of a substantive body of information aboutbackground radionuclide concentrations in stream or river sediment. It is reasonable to believeconcentrations are similar to background levels in soils (described earlier in this section)although solutioning is likely to result in somewhat lower levels for certain nuclides.

Groundwater - Public Wells

During the September, 1989 sampling conducted by FIT, five Cushing municipal wells (allpublic wells are located more than 1 miles to the south and southeast of the site) were sampled. Contaminants found are likely to arise from background conditions. The samples were analyzedfor inorganic contaminants. Lead and manganese levels slightly exceeded ATSDR comparisonvalues derived for drinking water. Iron and sodium were the detected at elevated levels but donot have ATSDR comparison values (Table C12). Samples were analyzed for volatile organiccompounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), and other organic chemicals. None were detected. During the November, 1989 sampling conducted by FIT, three of the fivepublic wells sampled in September 1989 were re-sampled. The samples were analyzed forinorganic contaminants and a limited number of organic contaminants. The following inorganiccontaminants were detected at levels which exceed ATSDR comparison values: arsenic andberyllium. Calcium, cobalt, and sodium have no comparison values (Table C12). Samples wereanalyzed for VOCs, SVOCs, and other organic chemicals. None were detected.

ODEQ has provided results of samples taken in several public wells in 1994 and 1995 (TableC12). Contaminants found are likely to arise from background conditions. Samples wereanalyzed for inorganic parameters, for VOCs and a few semivolatile compounds SVOCs. Thefollowing inorganic contaminants were detected at levels which exceed ATSDR comparisonvalues: arsenic and manganese. Iron and sodium have no comparison values. No organicchemicals were detected.

The December, 1989 document Comments of Kerr-McGee Corporation in Response to EPA'sProposed Listing of the Cushing, Oklahoma Site, includes a radioactive chemical samplinganalysis of municipal water wells. Gross alpha measurements are below the MCL; gross betawas measured at a levels of 2.65 to 3.39 pCi/L, below the Primary Drinking Water Standardsgross beta screening value of 50 pCi/L. The November, 1989, resampling of public wells byFIT included analysis for radium-226, uranium-234, 235, 238, thorium-227, 228, 230,232,bismuth-214, lead-214, and gross alpha (Table C13). There is inconclusive data to determine thesource of several of the radionuclides in municipal wells. The concentrations of radionuclidesare well below the MCLs.

Groundwater - Private Wells

During the March, 1988 sampling conducted by TAT to characterize Property A, a private wellsample was collected on that property (Table C14). Analysis of the sample did not identify anyinorganic contaminants at levels which exceed ATSDR comparison values. No ATSDRcomparison values are available for calcium, iron, potassium, and sodium. No VOCs,semivolatile compounds (SVOCs), or other organic chemicals were detected. This residence isnot connected to the public water system and, therefore, is probably using the well as a source ofpotable water.

Samples were also taken in March 1988 from three wells located within ¼ mile of the site--thisincludes one well at a former residence that had been "on site" (within the site boundariesdefined in Figure 1) on Linwood Avenue, near Deep Rock Road. None of the maximum valuesreported were from that well. The other wells sampled are on the east side of Linwood Avenue;one is immediately north of Property A and the other is a short distance south of Skull Creek. ATSDR's information suggests that those wells either have not been used for potable water orhave not been used in that way for many years. Samples were taken during the November, 1989sampling by FIT, and the 1989 and 1990 sampling by the Payne County Health Department forOSHD, and one well was resampled by ODEQ in July, 1995 (Table C14). Sample analysesshowed the following inorganic contaminants at levels which exceed ATSDR comparisonvalues; arsenic, beryllium, lead, manganese, and zinc. Cobalt, iron, and sodium do not havecomparison values. Two wells were analyzed for VOCs, SVOCs and other organic chemicals;the other was analyzed for VOCs. Some unidentified SVOCs were detected in the well locatedjust north of Property A. No organic compounds were detected in the other two wells.

During the December, 1989 and January 1990 sampling conducted by the Payne County HealthDepartment for OSHD, nine private wells located ½ to 3 miles from the site were sampled andanalyzed for several inorganic contaminants (Table C14). A few of those are used as a potablewater source potable The following were detected at levels exceeding the ATSDR comparisonvalues: lead and manganese. There are no comparison values for iron. One of the nearest of this group of wells was analyzed for VOCs; none were detected.

During the December 1995 sampling by Kerr McGee and ODEQ, a sample was taken (and split)from a private well being used for potable water supply immediately east of the site (south ofProperty A) on Deep Rock Road (Table C14). None of the metals detected exceeded ATSDRcomparison values. VOCs and SVOCs were analyzed for and not detected. The split samplesalso were analyzed for radioactivity (Table 15B); values were not elevated.

During the 1989 and 1990 sampling conducted by the Payne County Health Department forOSHD, eleven private wells were sampled for radioactivity. One well is on former privateproperty located "on site" near Linwood and Deep Rock Roads, by the east edge of the site. Thedetected radioisotopes were below levels of public health concern (Table C15).

The November, 1989 sampling by FIT of private wells included a well sampled for radium-226,uranium-234, 235, 238, thorium-227, 228, 230, 232, bismuth-214, lead-214 and gross alphacontamination (Table C15). The values recorded were below levels of health concern.

Surface Water

During the May, 1986 sampling conducted by FIT three of the five surface water samples weretaken from off-site locations of Skull Creek and its tributaries. The samples were split, EPApossessing one set of the samples and Kerr-McGee the other. The samples were analyzed forboth inorganic and organic contaminants. The following inorganic contaminants were detectedabove ATSDR comparison values (derived for use as drinking water): arsenic, beryllium,cadmium, lead, and manganese. Calcium, potassium, and sodium concentrations were elevatedbut do not have comparison values. No organic contaminants were present above ATSDRcomparison values (Table C16).

During the March, 1988 sampling conducted by TAT, two samples of water were taken fromSkull Creek and a tributary near Property A, downstream of the Kerr-McGee property (TableC16). Manganese was detected at levels above its ATSDR drinking water comparison value. No comparison value is available for sodium. No organic compounds were detected.

During the January and February, 1989 sampling conducted by the Payne County HealthDepartment four area ponds were sampled for the following inorganic contaminants: barium,copper, iron, lead, manganese, sodium, and zinc. Only manganese concentrations exceedATSDR drinking water comparison values (Table C16). None of the samples were analyzed fororganic compounds. None of the ponds are in watersheds that would be affected by site runoff. Two ponds are more than a thousand feet from the southwest part of the site. A third is severalhundred feet north of the property, and the fourth is about a thousand feet east.

During the March, 1988 sampling conducted by TAT to characterize Property A, two surfacewater samples were collected from Skull Creek and a tributary downstream from Property A. Analysis of the samples indicated the presence of the following inorganic contaminants at levelswhich either exceed an ATSDR comparison value: manganese, or they have no comparisonvalue: potassium, and sodium (Table C16). Organic compounds were not detected.

During the December 1995 joint sampling by Kerr-McGee and ODEQ, several samples weretaken of creek water downstream from the site. Representative concentration information areprovided on Table C16. Organic compounds were not detected. No ATSDR comparison valueswere exceeded. Radiologic analyses results are provided in Table C17. Values are not elevatedand are consistent with data found in surface water reports issued by EPA in their EnvironmentalRadiation Ambient Monitoring System program reports..

During the Oklahoma Department of Health's Private Well and Pond Sampling near the Kerr-McGee Cushing Refinery, conducted from October, 1989 through April, 1990, four ponds weresampled for radioactivity. Gross alpha measurements are below the MCL; gross beta wasmeasured at a levels of 2 to 4 pCi/L. These are not present at levels of concern. Radium-226/228 appears to be slightly elevated above the current MCL of 5 pCi/L but below theproposed MCL (Table C17).

During the May, 1986 sampling conducted by FIT four off-site surface water samples werecollected from Skull Creek. The following radioactive chemicals were detected: radium-226,radium-228, uranium-233+234, uranium-238, thorium-232, thorium-230, thorium-228, lead-210, and polonium-210 (Table C17). These are not present at levels of concern.

C. Contaminant Data Tables

List of Contaminant Tables

C1. Contaminant Concentrations in On-site Waste Material Samples (Sludge, Tar, etc.)
C2. Isotopes and Gamma Exposure Levels in On-Site Soil, Sediment, and Sludge;
       Environmental and Air Particulate Gamma Dose Levels
C3. Contaminant Concentrations in On-site Soils Samples of Unknown Depth
C4. Contaminant Concentrations in On-site Sediment Samples
C5. Contaminant Concentrations in On-site Monitoring Wells
C6. Radioactivity in On-site Monitoring Wells
C7. Contaminant Concentrations in On-site Surface Water Samples
C8. Contaminant Concentrations in Off-site Sludge
C9. Contaminant Concentrations in Off-site Soil Samples
C10. Contaminant Concentrations in Off-site Sediment Samples
C11. Radioactivity in Off-site Sediments
C12. Contaminant Concentrations in Off-site Groundwater (Public Wells)
C13. Radioactivity in Municipal Wells
C14. Contaminant Concentrations in Offsite Groundwater (Private Wells)
C15. Radioactivity in Private Wells
C16. Contaminant Concentrations in Off-site Surface Water
C17. Radioactivity in Off-Site Surface Water


List of Acronyms:
  • 0.26 ND
  • =Constituent was analyzed for but not detected; the associated numericalvalue is the sample quantitation limit for that specific analysis.
  • AL
  • =EPA Action Level
  • CORE
  • =CORE Laboratories
  • CREG
  • =Cancer Risk Evaluation Guide
  • DU
  • =Contaminant detected; concentration not known
  • EMEG
  • =Environmental Media Evaluation Guide
  • FIT
  • =EPA Field Investigation Team
  • IEMEG
  • =Media Evaluation Guide based on Intermediate MRL
  • kg
  • =kilogram
  • KM
  • =Kerr-McGee
  • L
  • =liter
  • MCLG
  • =Maximum contaminant Level Goal
  • MCL
  • =Maximum Contaminant Level
  • mg
  • =milligram
  • MRL
  • =ATSDR's Minimal Risk Level for noncarcinogenic outcomes
  • NA
  • =not analyzed
  • ND
  • =not detected
  • ODEQ
  • =Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality
  • OSDH
  • =Oklahoma State Department of Health
  • pCi/g
  • =picoCuries per gram--a unit of concentration
  • pCi/L
  • =picoCuries per liter--a unit of concentration
  • R
  • =roentgen--a unit of gamma radiation
  • rem
  • =radioactivity dose unit
  • RD
  • =rejected data
  • PMCLG
  • =Proposed Maximum Contaminant Level Goal
  • PMCL
  • =Proposed Maximum Contaminant Level
  • RfD
  • =Reference Dose
  • RIR
  • =Phase I Remedial Investigation Report
  • RMEG
  • =Reference Dose based Media Evaluation Guide
  • SLO
  • =Southwest Laboratory of Oklahoma
  • TAT
  • =EPA Technical Assistance Team


    Table C1.

    Range of Contaminant Concentrations in On-site Waste Material Samples (Sludge, Tar, etc.)
    Note: See discussion at end of table for further organic chemical information for samples associated with reference KM (6)

    ContaminantConcentration
    Range - mg/kg
    Sampling DateReferenceComparison Value
    mg/kgSource
    Aluminum1,320 - 11,700
    NA
    418 - 3,632
    127-19,300
    205 - 85,500
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    KM (6)
    58,000Western U.S.
    background
    AntimonyRD
    NA
    ND
    7.5 - 9.0
    ND - 120
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)
    KM (6)
    0.8RMEG-pica
    ArsenicND
    NA
    ND - 1.68
    1.6 - 9.3
    ND - 97
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    KM (6)
    0.6CREG
    BariumRD
    NA
    8.67
    2.3 - 105
    5 - 6,770
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    KM (6)
    100RMEG-pica
    BenzeneND - 0.044
    NA
    ND
    0.26ND - 4.9
    ND - 18
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)
    KM (6)
    20CREG
    Benzo(a)an-thraceneND - 80
    120 - 150
    ND
    160 - 1000ND
    ND - 200
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-04
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)
    KM (6)
    nonenone- carcinogen
    Benzo(a)pyreneND
    ND
    ND
    100 - 1000ND
    ND - 110
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)
    KM (6)
    0.1CREG
    BerylliumND
    NA
    ND
    0.23 - 1.3
    ND - 43
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)
    KM (6)
    0.2CREG
    Bis(2-ethylhexyl)
    phthalate
    ND - RD
    RD - 20
    ND
    81ND-1000ND
    ND - 1,200
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    KM (6)
    40RMEG-pica
    Bromodi-
    chloromethane
    ND
    ND
    ND
    0.64ND-1.3ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)
    KM (6)
    10
    40
    CREG
    EMEG-pica
    Cadmium ND
    NA
    ND - 1.67
    0.69 -3.8
    ND - 64
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)
    KM (6)
    1.04EMEG-pica
    Calcium3,860
    NA
    2,191 - 6,056
    115 - 1560
    97 - 789,000
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)
    KM (6)
    18,000Western U.S.background
    Chromium11 - 17
    NA
    15.8 - 63.6
    1.2 - 25.2
    2 - 250
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    KM (6)
    10

    (for hexavalent
    chromium)

    RMEG-pica
    Chrysene47 - 55
    130 - 170
    ND
    2.8 - 570 -1000ND
    ND - 390
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)
    KM (6)
    nonenone-carcinogen
    CobaltND
    NA
    ND
    1.1 - 1.4
    ND - 697
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)
    KM (6)
    7.1Western U.S.
    background
    CopperND - 13
    NA
    3.18 - 6.29
    7.7 - 26
    3.8 - 1,220
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    KM (6)
    21Western U.S.
    background
    Cyclohexane,
    1-bromo-4-methyl
    ND
    ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    nonenone
    Cyclohexane,
    1,2-dimethyl, trans
    ND
    ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    nonenone
    Cyclohexane,
    1-ethyl-2-methyl,
    cis
    ND
    ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    nonenone
    Cyclohexane,
    1-ethyl-4-methyl,
    trans
    ND
    ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    nonenone
    Cyclohexane,
    methyl
    ND
    ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    nonenone
    Cyclohexane,
    1,1,3-trimethyl
    ND
    ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    nonenone
    Cyclohexane,
    1,2,3-trimethyl
    ND
    ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    nonenone
    Cyclohexane,
    1,2,3 tri-
    methyl
    (1-alpha)
    ND
    ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    nonenone
    Cylopropane, 1-
    methyl-2-
    (methylp)
    ND
    ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    nonenone
    DimethyldecaneND
    ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    nonenone
    DimethylheptaneND
    ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    nonenone
    Hexane,
    2,2-dimethyl
    ND
    ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    nonenone
    Hexanol,
    3-methyl
    ND
    ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    nonenone
    2-HexanoneND - 0.25
    NA
    ND
    ND - 2.4
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    KM (6)
    nonenone
    Iron746 - 15,700
    NA
    229 - 3,119
    275 - 14,900
    248 - 403,000
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    KM (6)
    21,000Western U.S.background
    IsoctanolND
    ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    nonenone
    Lead9.4 - 24
    NA
    11 - 81.8
    0.25 - 32.3
    ND - 3,680
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)
    KM (6)
    17Western U.S.
    background
    (carcinogen)
    MagnesiumRD
    NA
    88.9 - 3,611
    71.6 - 98.8
    56 - 188,000
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)
    KM (6)
    7,800Western U. S.background
    ManganeseND - RD
    NA
    2.53 - 24.9
    2.3 - 2,370
    3 - 65,000
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    KM (6)
    300RMEG-pica
    MercuryND
    NA
    ND - 0.15
    0.11 - 190
    ND - 3.5
    5-86
    9-87
    5-86
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    KM (6)
    nonenone
    2-Methyl-
    naphthalene
    ND - 4.9
    ND
    ND
    29-1000ND
    0.3 - 5,000
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)
    KM (6)
    nonenone
    NaphthaleneND
    ND
    ND
    200ND-1000ND
    ND - 620
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)
    KM (6)
    nonenone
    NickelND
    NA
    ND - 13.9
    1.6 - 18.5
    ND - 1,210
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    KM (6)
    40RMEG-pica
    N-nitrosodi-phenylamineND
    ND
    ND
    200ND-260ND
    ND - 95
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)
    KM (6)
    100CREG
    Oxirane,
    2-(1,1 dimethyl-
    ethyl)3 ethyl
    ND
    ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    nonenone
    Pentane,
    2,3-dimethyl
    ND
    ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    nonenone
    1-Pentene,
    2,3-dimethyl
    ND
    ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    nonenone
    Phenanthrene6.8 - 58
    ND - RD
    ND
    100 - 260
    ND - 680
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)
    KM (6)
    nonenone
    PotassiumRD - 1,270
    NA
    ND - RD
    60.3 - 1,280
    271 - 20,600
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    KM (6)
    18,000Western U.S.background
    SeleniumRD
    NA
    ND
    0.46 - 0.55
    ND - 3.7
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)
    KM (6)
    4EMEG-pica
    SilverND
    NA
    ND - RD
    1.8 - 8.2
    ND - 204
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)
    KM (6)
    10RMEG-pica
    SodiumRD
    NA
    193.2 - 6,732
    105 - 2290
    129 - 76,500
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)
    KM (6)
    10,000Western U.S.background
    TrichloroethyleneND
    ND
    ND
    0.31ND-1.3ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)
    KM (6)
    60CREG
    Trichloropro-pyleneND
    ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    nonenone
    TrimethylpentaneND
    ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    nonenone
    VanadiumRD
    NA
    ND - 12.2
    3.7 - 40.8
    1.3 - 948
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    KM (6)
    nonenone
    ZincND - 49
    NA
    5.35 - 13.1
    0.52 - 71.8
    2 - 12,200
    5-86
    9-87
    5-88
    90-92
    9-94
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    KM (6)
    600RMEG-pica
    Note: Analyses of samples described in Ref. KM (6) revealed concentrations for several organic chemicals in addition to those shown in thistable. The four chemicals listed below either exceed ATSDR's comparison value for pica child ingestion or have no comparison value andexceed a concentration of 5 ppm: dibenzofuran, 12 ppm; pyrene, 420 ppm; benzo(b)fluoranthene, 65; and benzo(ghi)perlene, 58 ppm.



    Table C2.

    Isotopes and Gamma Exposure Levels in On-Site Soil, Sediment, and Sludge; Environmental and Air Particulate Gamma Dose Levels

    IsotopeBackground,
    Off-Site Soil
    Maximum
    Value pCi/g
    On-Site Soil On-Site Sediment On-Site Sludge
    Range
    pCi/g
    Sampling DateReferenceRange
    pCi/g
    Sampling
    Date
    ReferenceRange
    pCi/g
    Sampling
    Date
    Reference
    Radium-2261.170.4 to 1.9
    Nuclear Process Area: -.3 to 493.6
    Unaffected Areas: 0.45 to 1.65 (one higher
    value at 59.65)
    5/86
    11/89
    1994
    FIT (1)
    KM (10)
    KM (12)
    0.9 to 1.1
    0.0 to 0.5
    5/86
    11/89
    FIT (1)
    KM (10)
    0.4 to 1.15/86FIT (1)
    Radium-228NA0.7 to 2.05/86FIT (1) 0.9 to 2.15/86FIT (1) 0.4 to 8.35/86FIT (1)
    Uranium-233,2343.9.26 to 1.8
    Site Wide: 0.42 to 940
    Unaffected Areas; 0 to 3.57
    5/86
    1990
    1994
    FIT (1)
    KM (11)
    KM (12)
    .28 to.35/86FIT (1) .14 to .925/86FIT (1)
    Uranium-2350.15-.02 to 0.17
    Nuclear Process Area: 0.016 to 35.5
    Unaffected Areas: 0 to 0.19
    5/86
    1990
    1994
    FIT (1)
    KM (11)
    KM (12)
    -.025/86FIT (1) -.11 to 0.05/86FIT (1)
    Uranium-2382.39.17 to 1.8
    Nuclear Process Area: 0.0 to 80.9
    Site Wide: 0.32 to 116
    Unaffected Areas: 0 to 5.62
    5/86
    11/89
    1990
    1994
    FIT (1)
    KM (10)
    KM (11)
    KM (12)
    .28
    0.0
    5/86
    11/89
    FIT (1)
    KM (10)
    .22 to .635/86FIT (1)
    Uranium-totalNASite Wide: 0.0 to 518.41990KM (11)0.0-2791990KM (11)0.0 to 9.61990KM (11)
    Thorium-232NA.61 to 2.5
    Nuclear Process Area: 0.0 to 209.6
    Site Wide: 0.4 to 73.1
    Unaffected Areas: 0.5 to 2.46 (two higher
    values at 7.43 and 47.96)
    5/86
    11/89
    1990
    1994
    FIT (1)
    KM (10)
    KM (11)
    KM (12)
    .88 to 1.5
    .8 to 2.9
    3 to 908
    5/86
    11/89
    1990
    FIT (1)
    KM (10)
    KM (11)
    .36 to 5.3
    0.0 to 34
    5/86
    1990
    FIT (1)
    KM (11)
    Thorium-230NA.54 to 2.35/86FIT (1) .59 to 1.05/86FIT (1) .31 to 1.75/86FIT (1)
    Thorium-228NA.58 to 2.85/86FIT (1) .82 to 1.65/86FIT (1) .33 to 155/86FIT (1)
    Thorium-227NA-.04 to .445/86FIT (1) 0.005/86FIT (1) 0.0 to .575/86FIT (1)
    Lead-210NA1.0 to 1.65/86FIT (1) 1.4 to 1.85/86FIT (1) 1.85/86FIT (1)
    Polonium-210NA.54 to 1.35/86FIT (1) .94 to 1.55/86FIT (1) 1.65/86FIT (1)



    Table C2.

    Continued) Isotopes and Gamma Exposure Levels in On-Site Soil, Sediment, and Sludge; Environmental and Air Particulate Gamma Dose Levels

    Background
    Off-Site Soil
    Maximum
    Value
    On-Site SoilOn-Site SedimentOn-Site Sludge
    RangeSampling
    Date
    ReferenceRangeSampling
    Date
    ReferenceRangeSampling
    Date
    Reference
    Gamma
    Exposure
    9.4 µR/hrFor Nuclear Process Area
        Inside buildings: 3-8 µrem/hr
        Outside process buildings: 3-135 µrem/hr
        and 6-120 µR/hr
    For Site Wide Survey
        Inside buildings: 7.3 to 10 µR/hr
        On land: 7-10.3 µR/hr
    11/89

    1994

    KM (10)

    KM (12)

    7-8 µR/hr1990KM (11)3 to 120 µR/hr1990KM (11)

    Soil depths for FIT samples are unspecified. KM samples taken in 1989 are 0-6 inches and 6-12 inches combined. KM samples taken in 1994 are from 0-6 inches.
    Background samples were taken within 1/2 mile of site.


    Table C2.

    (Continued) Isotopes and Gamma Exposure Levels in On-Site Soil, Sediment, and Sludge; Environmental and Air Particulate Gamma Dose Levels

    Environmental Radiation Air Particulate Radiation
    Radiation LevelSampling
    Date
    ReferenceRadiation LevelSampling
    Date
    Reference
    Gamma Dose58 mRem, maximum level1994KM (30)28 mRem, average
    30 mRem, maximum
    1994KM (30)



    Table C3.

    Range of Contaminant Concentrations in On-site Soils Samples of Unknown Depth
    Note: The data set is for several soil samples and rock samples.

    ContaminantConcentration
    Range - mg/kg
    Sampling
    Date
    ReferenceComparison Value
    mg/kgSource
    Aluminum7,760 - 23,900
    191 - 1,400
    9,260 - 27,600
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    58,000Western U.S. background
    AntimonyRD
    ND - RD
    ND
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    0.8RMEG-pica
    ArsenicND - 10
    ND - 2.17
    0.7 - 25
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    0.6CREG
    BariumRD
    22.5 - 400
    8.1 - 143
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    100RMEG-pica
    BenzeneND - 0.011
    ND
    ND
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    20CREG
    Benzo(a)anthraceneND
    ND
    ND
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    nonenone-carcinogen
    Benzo(a)pyreneND
    ND
    ND
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    0.1CREG
    BerylliumND - RD
    ND
    0.8 - 1.8
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    0.2CREG
    Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalateND - 3.5
    ND - 0.53
    ND
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    40RMEG-pica
    BromodichloromethaneND
    ND
    ND
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    10
    40
    CREG
    EMEG-pica
    CadmiumND
    1.73 - 3.72
    ND
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    1.0EMEG-pica
    (carcinogen)
    Calcium2,800 - 51,900
    623 - 1,140
    1,840 - 41,800
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    18,000Western U.S. background
    Chromium12 - 114
    16.7 - 95.5
    15.9 - 47.2
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    10 (forhexavalentchromium)EMEG-pica
    ChryseneND - 5.1
    ND
    ND
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    nonenone-carcinogen
    CobaltND - 49
    RD
    4.9 - 18
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    7.1Western U.S. background
    Copper14 - 220
    20.9 - 309
    10 - 61.1
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    21Western U.S. background
    Cyclohexane, 1-bromo-4-methylND
    ND
    NA
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    nonenone
    Cyclohexane, 1,2-dimethyl, transND
    ND
    NA
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    nonenone
    Cyclohexane, 1-ethyl-2-methyl, cisND
    ND
    NA
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    nonenone
    Cyclohexane, 1-ethyl-4-methyl, transND
    ND
    NA
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    nonenone
    Cyclohexane, methylND
    ND
    NA
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    nonenone
    Cyclohexane, 1,1,3-trimethylND
    ND
    NA
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    nonenone
    Cyclohexane, 1,2,3-trimethylND
    ND
    NA
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    nonenone
    Cyclohexane, 1,2,3-trimethyl(1-alpha)ND
    ND
    NA
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    nonenone
    Cyclopropane, 1-methyl-2-(methylp)ND
    ND
    NA
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    nonenone
    Dimethyl decaneND
    ND
    NA
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    nonenone
    Dimethyl heptaneND
    ND
    NA
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    nonenone
    Hexane, 2,2-dimethylND
    ND
    NA
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    nonenone
    Hexanol, 3-methylND
    ND
    NA
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    nonenone
    2-HexanoneND - 0.039
    ND
    ND
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    nonenone
    Iron7,820 - 45,300
    15,620 - 35,300
    10,500 - 36,300
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    21,000Western U.S. background
    IsoctanolND
    ND
    NA
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    nonenone
    Lead6.1 - 374
    4.4 - 13.8
    2.8 - 194
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    17Western U.S. background
    (carcinogen)
    Magnesium2,530 - 7,280
    RD - 543
    2,250 - 20,600
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    7,800Western U.S. background
    ManganeseRD
    160 - 304
    21.9 - 972
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    300RMEG-pica
    MercuryND - 5.6
    ND - 0.32
    ND
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    nonenone
    2-MethylnaphthaleneND
    ND
    ND
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    nonenone
    NaphthaleneND - 2.5
    ND
    ND
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    nonenone
    NickelND - 49
    14 - 55.3
    9.7 - 50.9
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    40RMEG-pica
    N-nitrosodiphenylamineND - 2.6
    ND
    ND
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    100CREG
    Oxirane, 2-(1,1-dimethylethyl)3 ethylND
    ND
    NA
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    nonenone
    Pentane, 2,3-dimethylND
    ND
    NA
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    nonenone
    1-Pentene, 2,3-dimethylND
    ND
    NA
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    nonenone
    PhenanthreneND - 8
    ND
    ND
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    nonenone
    PotassiumRD
    ND - RD
    999 - 4,500
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    18,000Western U.S. background
    SeleniumRD
    ND
    ND
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    4EMEG-pica
    SilverND
    1.11 - 9.5
    ND
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    10RMEG-pica
    SodiumRD - 3,130
    RD - 49.4
    ND - 275
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    10,000Western U.S. background
    TrichloroethyleneND
    ND
    ND
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    60CREG
    TrichloropropyleneND
    ND
    NA
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    nonenone
    TrimethylpentaneND
    ND
    NA
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    nonenone
    VanadiumRD
    ND - RD
    17.4 - 45.6
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    nonenone
    Zinc27 - 453
    8.67 - 26.6
    13.7 - 85.4
    5-86
    5-88
    7-92
    FIT (1)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (9)
    600RMEG-pica




    Table C4.

    Range of Contaminant Concentrations in On-site Sediment Samples

    Note: The last two data sets identify separately information for samples taken from:
              o Tributaries to Skull Creek, near Pits 1, 2, 3, and 4
              o Skull Creek, including samples adjacent to Pit 5

    ContaminantConcentration Range
    mg/kg
    Sampling
    Date
    ReferenceComparison Value
    mg/kgSource
    Aluminum8,240 - 11,300
    NA
    11,030
    1,966 - 10,914
    8,570 - 19,200
    4,490 - 18,800
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    58,000Western U.S.background
    AntimonyRD
    NA
    ND
    ND - 10.98
    9.4ND-11ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    0.8RMEG-pica
    ArsenicND
    NA
    7.4
    1.24 - 10.1
    2.6 - 10.2
    4.3 - 14.5
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    0.6CREG
    BariumND - 141
    NA
    158
    59.4 - 195
    118 - 148
    39 - 143
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    100RMEG-pica
    BenzeneND - RD
    NA
    DU
    ND -RD
    0.006ND - 0.009ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    20CREG
    Benzo(a)anthraceneND
    ND
    NI
    ND
    0.76ND-37ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    nonenone-carcinogen
    Benzo(a)pyreneND - 0.74
    ND
    NI
    ND
    0.76ND-37ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    0.1CREG
    BerylliumND
    NA
    2
    ND - 0.98
    0.59 - 1.7
    0.53 - 2.4
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    0.2CREG
    Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalateND - RD
    0.38 - RD
    NI
    ND
    0.76ND-37ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    40RMEG-pica
    BromodichloromethaneND
    ND
    NI
    ND
    0.006ND-0.009ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    10
    40
    CREG
    EMEG-pica
    CadmiumND
    NA
    ND
    ND - 3
    0.54ND - 0.63ND
    ND - 1
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    1.0EMEG-pica
    Calcium3,120 - 3,550
    NA
    19,955
    1,591 - 6,432
    648 - 11,300
    10,600 - 75,700
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    18,000Western U.S.background
    Chromium14 - 18
    NA
    30
    12.24 - 48.4
    12.7 - 36.8
    14 - 40.7
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    10 (forhexavalentchromium)EMEG- pica
    ChryseneND
    ND - 0.49
    NI
    ND
    0.9ND-0.12
    ND - 3.5
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    nonenone-carcinogen
    CobaltND
    NA
    11
    8.61 - 10.6
    4.5 - 25.2
    4.2 - 26.4
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    7.1Western U.S.background
    Copper14 - 15
    NA
    230
    5.7 - 37.1
    9.8 -30.7
    11.4 - 58.9
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    21Western U.S.background
    Cyclohexane, 1-bromo-4-methylND - 0.062
    ND
    NI
    ND
    NA
    NA
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    nonenone
    Cyclohexane, 1,2-dimethyl, transND - 0.14
    ND
    NI
    ND
    NA
    NA
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    nonenone
    Cyclohexane, 1-ethyl-2-methyl, cisND - 0.057
    ND
    NI
    ND
    NA
    NA
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    nonenone
    Cyclohexane, 1-ethyl-4-methyl, transND - 0.2
    ND
    NI
    ND
    NA
    NA
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    nonenone
    Cyclohexane, methylND - 0.11
    ND
    NI
    ND
    NA
    NA
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    nonenone
    Cyclohexane, 1,1,3-trimethylND - 0.26
    ND
    NI
    ND
    NA
    NA
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    nonenone
    Cyclohexane, 1,2,3-trimethylND - 0.047
    ND
    NI
    ND
    NA
    NA
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    nonenone
    Cyclohexane, 1,2,3-trimethyl (1-alpha)ND - 0.32
    ND
    NI
    ND
    NA
    NA
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    nonenone
    Cyclopropane, 1-methyl-2-(methylp)ND - 0.11
    ND
    NI
    ND
    NA
    NA
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    nonenone
    Dimethyl decaneND - 0.61
    ND
    NI
    ND
    NA
    NA
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    nonenone
    Dimethyl heptaneND - 0.3
    ND
    NI
    ND
    NA
    NA
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    nonenone
    Hexane, 2,2-dimethylND - 0.03
    ND
    NI
    ND
    NA
    NA
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    nonenone
    Hexanol, 3-methylND - 0.061
    ND
    NI
    ND
    NA
    NA
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    nonenone
    2-HexanoneND
    ND
    NI
    ND
    0.11ND - 0.19ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    nonenone
    Iron13400 - 15300
    NA
    19,672
    760 - 19584
    12,600 - 23,300
    8,250 - 40,700
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    21,000Western U.S.background
    IsoctanolND - 0.078
    ND
    NI
    ND
    NA
    NA
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    nonenone
    Lead17 - 27
    NA
    40
    25.1 - 104
    9 - 58.3
    11 - 154
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    17Western U.S.
    background
    (carcinogen)
    MagnesiumRD - 2,520
    NA
    4,891
    1,586 - 2600
    1,260 - 4,770
    2,090 - 8,410
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    7,800Western U.S.
    background
    Manganese218 - 587
    NA
    526
    34.6 - 884
    192 - 1,580
    422 - 8,200
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    300EMEG-pica
    MercuryND
    NA
    ND
    ND - 0.29
    0.13ND-0.16ND
    ND - 0.81
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    nonenone
    2-MethylnaphthaleneND
    ND - RD
    NI
    ND
    0.76ND-37ND
    ND - 14
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    nonenone
    NaphthaleneND
    ND - 100
    NI
    ND
    0.76-37ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    nonenone
    NickelND
    NA
    20
    6.59 - 23.3
    10.6 - 29.20
    8.4 - 36.1
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    40RMEG-pica
    N-nitrosodiphenylamineND
    ND
    NI
    ND
    0.76ND-37ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    100CREG
    Oxirane, 2-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-3 ethylND - 0.047
    ND
    NI
    ND
    NA
    NA
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    nonenone
    Pentane, 2,3-dimethylND - 0.01
    ND
    NI
    ND
    NA
    NA
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    nonenone
    1-Pentene, 2,3-dimethylND - 0.3
    ND
    NI
    ND
    NA
    NA
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    nonenone
    PhenanthreneND
    ND
    NI
    ND
    0.7ND-37ND
    ND - 2.7
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    nonenone
    PotassiumRD
    NA
    1,870
    RD - 761
    864 - 2,040
    612 - 3,220
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    18,000Western U.S.background
    SeleniumRD
    NA
    ND
    ND
    0.54ND-0.63ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    4EMEG-pica
    SilverND
    NA
    2
    RD - 1.56
    1.6ND-1.9ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    10RMEG-pica
    SodiumRD
    NA
    215
    RD
    247ND-616
    ND - 275
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    10,000Western U.S.
    background
    TrichloroethyleneND
    ND
    DU
    ND
    0.006ND-0.009ND
    ND
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    60CREG
    TrichloropropyleneND - 0.3
    ND
    NI
    ND
    NA
    NA
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    nonenone
    TrimethylpentaneND - 0.3
    ND
    NI
    ND
    NA
    NA
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT 3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    nonenone
    VanadiumND
    NA
    29
    13.1 - 29.5
    18.5 - 33.6
    12.9 - 44
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    nonenone
    Zinc29 - 65
    NA
    217
    5.93 - 112.4
    19.4 - 84.5
    95.3 - 204
    5-86
    9-87
    3-88
    5-88
    90-92
    90-92
    FIT (1)
    KM (1)
    TAT (3)
    TAT (1)
    RIR (5)(9)
    RIR (5)(9)
    600RMEG-pica


    Next Section      Table of Contents

      
     
    USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
    Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, 4770 Buford Hwy NE, Atlanta, GA 30341
    Contact CDC: 800-232-4636 / TTY: 888-232-6348

    A-Z Index

    1. A
    2. B
    3. C
    4. D
    5. E
    6. F
    7. G
    8. H
    9. I
    10. J
    11. K
    12. L
    13. M
    14. N
    15. O
    16. P
    17. Q
    18. R
    19. S
    20. T
    21. U
    22. V
    23. W
    24. X
    25. Y
    26. Z
    27. #