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PUBLIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT

TOOELE ARMY DEPOT (NORTH AREA)
TOOELE, TOOELE COUNTY, UTAH


TABLES

 

Table 1.

Evaluation of Public Health Hazards Associated With the Operable Units and Other Source Areas at TEAD
Sites Site Description/Waste Disposal History Investigation Results/ Environmental Monitoring Results1 Corrective Activities ATSDR's Evaluation of Public Health Hazards
Operable Unit 4
Former Transformer Boxing Area (Solid Waste Management Unit
[SWMU] 31)
The Former transformer boxing area is located on Open Storage Lot 690 in the Industrial Area.

The site is an unpaved lot measuring 625 feet by 300 feet which was used from about 1979 to 1980 for temporary storage of transformers. It is currently used for vehicle storage.

There is no evidence of activities that have resulted in spills or leaks of PCB-contaminated oils from transformers.

Surface soil2:
A total of 21 surface soil samples (0-6 inches) were collected during the Phase II Remedial Investigation (RI). All samples were analyzed for PCBs and seven were analyzed for metals, semi- volatile organic compounds (SVOCs), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

The Phase II RI identified low concentrations of SVOCs in soil. PCBs and VOCs were not detected in this area. Low concentrations of lead were also detected, but below EPAs action levels.

A Preliminary Assessment (PA)/Site Investigation (SI) and RI have been completed. The Feasibility Study (FS) recommended 5-year site reviews and that deed restrictions be applied to prevent residential use. This site was recommended for no further action. There is no evidence of PCB contamination and levels of SVOCs and metals (e.g., lead) were not detected at levels of public health concern. Therefore, this site does not pose a public health hazard.
Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) Spill Site
(SWMU 32)
The PCB spill site is located in the southern corner of Open Storage Lot 665D in the Industrial Area.

In October 1980, two transformers each containing 1,000 gallons of PCB-contaminated oil were punctured with a fork-lift blade during a transformer removal operation. Although there is no information about how much oil actually spilled from the transformers, the spill occurred on unpaved ground. Oil-saturated soils were containerized and properly disposed. The excavated area was backfilled with imported fill material.

The area is currently used for vehicle-related equipment storage.

Soil:
During the Phase I investigation (February 1997), a total of 17 surface soil samples were collected from an area measuring 45 by 50 feet and analyzed for PCBs. Aroclor 1260 (0.21 parts per million [ppm]) was detected in all five composite samples.

During the Phase II RI investigation conducted in 1994, a total of 15 surface and 16 subsurface samples (sample depth ranged from 0 to 13 feet bgs) were collected. All samples were analyzed for PCBs and about one-third were analyzed for metals, VOCs, and SVOCs.

PCBs were not detected in any of the samples collected for the Phase II RI. Low concentrations of metals and SVOCs were detected.

In 1978 and 1979, a soil removal action was completed, resulting in PCB concentrations well below cleanup levels. The excavation measures approximately 50 by 70 feet and up to 8 feet deep.

A PA/SI and RI have been completed. The FS recommended 5-year site reviews and that deed restrictions be applied to prevent residential use.

This site was recommended for no further action.

The concentrations of PCBs detected in surface soil were very low and below its comparison value (CV). Levels of SVOCs and metals were not detected at levels of public health concern. The area does not pose a public health hazard.
Wastewater Spreading Area
(SWMU 35)
The wastewater spreading area is located about 1,500 feet south of the administrative area and 4,000 feet west of the former residential complex. It covers an area approximately 2,000 feet by 500 feet. The site is fenced and is used as a horse stable.

Wastewater from residential areas was discharged into unlined ditches up until the mid 1950s and flowed into this flat area covered with vegetation.

It is not known whether wastewater discharged to this area from other sources.

Soil:
During the RI, a total of 19 surface samples (0-6 inches) and 16 subsurface samples were collected (2 to 6 feet) during the Phase I and II investigation in 1992 and 1994 respectively.

Two pesticides, heptachlor epoxide (0.25 ppm) and delta-hexachloro-cyclohexane (2.4 ppm), were detected in surface soil above ATSDR's CVs. One metal, arsenic (32 ppm), was detected above ATSDR's CV.

Groundwater:
During the Phase II investigation, water supply well WW-1 was sampled for SVOCs, VOCs, pesticides, metals, and explosives. This well did not contain any contaminants that exceeded state or federal safe drinking water standards.

The Phase II RI was completed. The FS recommended 5-year site reviews and that deed restrictions be applied to prevent residential use. SWMU 35 is currently fenced and most of the contaminants were below ATSDR's CVs. This site does not pose a public health hazard because of the restricted access and very low levels of contamination present.
Operable Unit 5
Former Transformer Storage Area
(SWMU 17)
This area is a gravel lot covering approximately 5 acres located in the northern portion of the maintenance area. It was used for storage of transformers and capacitors; many of the transformers were contaminated with PCBs.

In 1979, all transformers were moved to a PCB storage building (SWMU 33). The area is currently used to store vehicular equipment.

Soil:
Following the removal of the transformers in 1979, it was reported that TEAD personnel collected a small number of samples (0 to 3 inches bgs) and analyzed these samples for PCBs.

In February 1987, a follow-up sampling was conducted to confirm previous results. A total of 30 surface (0-6 inches in depth) soil samples were collected and composited into six samples for analysis. These samples were analyzed for Aroclors 1016, 1221, 1232, 1242, 1248, 1254, and 1260.

Aroclor 1254 was detected in one soil sample (0.019 ppm) and PCB 1260 was detected in all six composite samples (0.108 ppm) at concentrations below ATSDR's CVs.

The PA/SI and RI/FS have been completed, and according to the Army, no further action is necessary for this site.

A Record of Decision (ROD) for OU 5, which includes SWMUs 17 and 33, has been signed and the site was recommended for no further action.

This area does not pose a public health hazard. There is no evidence that any substantial PCB contamination occurred at this site. The results of sampling did not identify PCBs exceeding ATSDR's health-based CVs.
PCB Storage Building
(SWMU 33)
The PCB storage building (Building 659) is an area located in the Industrial Area of TEAD.

This storage area has a sealed cement floor, perimeter berm, and paved surroundings.

It began operation in 1979, storing thousands of transformers. PCB-contaminated transformers that are removed from TEAD are temporarily stored here.

Spills of PCB oils have occurred in the storage area. PCB waste materials are disposed of at the Grassy Mountain Hazardous Waste Landfill in Utah.

There are no data to indicate that PCB-contaminated wastes have been released into the soils and environment outside of the building.

The facility is operated in compliance with a Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) permit controlling the handling and disposal of PCBs.

An inspection of the storage area noted that approximately 6,000 transformers and 15 drums were stored in the building.

A ROD for OU 5, which includes SWMU 17 and 33, has been signed and the site was recommended for no further action.

The remediation for Building 659 was completed in September 1996 and transferred under the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Act for eventual use by the private sector.

All floor and wall surfaces were cleaned to a standard of 10 ppm for PCBs, which was established for industrial use. Confirmation sampling was conducted after cleaning to verify that the standard was met.

This storage building does not pose a public health hazard. The building was permitted under TSCA and was closely monitored. In the past, spills have occurred within the building. However, the contamination was contained by the sealed concrete floor, cleaned up, and disposed of properly.

According to TEAD officials, the building was transferred under BRAC through the Redevelopment Agency of Tooele City in 1998. The building was released to a private commercial developer after the required PCB remediation was completed. As part of the BRAC action, all of the transformers were transferred to another

Operable Unit 6
Drummed Radioactive Waste Area
(SWMU 9)
This site is located in the Industrial Area in the northeast corner of TEAD. It consists of a concrete pad and adjacent field that were used for temporary storage of containerized low-level radioactive waste.

According to TEAD personnel, one 55-gallon drum of radioactive waste was stored at this site from approximately 1960 to 1978. The materials reportedly included transmitting tubes used to generate microwaves for radar systems, luminous watch dials, contaminated tools, and decontamination materials.

There is no evidence of any waste disposal or spill in this area and the container was removed and transported off site.

In a 1992 radiological survey of 90% of the ground area, no elevated beta/gamma emissions were detected. Elevated alpha radiation is not expected. The PA/SI and RI/FS have been completed. No further response is necessary.

The ROD for OU 6, which consists of SWMUs 9 and 18, was signed in September 1994. This area was recommended for no further action.

SWMU 9 does not pose a public health hazard. There is no evidence of any spills of radioactive contaminants or other wastes and the 55-gallon drum of radioactive waste was removed and transported off site. The site no longer contains storage containers of radioactive waste and has been used to store 4-wheel-drive vehicles for the Army.
Radioactive Waste Storage Building (SWMU 18) The radioactive waste storage area is located in the Industrial Area of TEAD. A secured and isolated room with a concrete floor within the PCB storage building 659 (SWMU 33) was used for storing radioactive materials.

The storage area was licenced by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and was permitted to store radioactive material. The storage area was used for approximately 15 years.

Materials stored in this area include radiation-detection meters, compasses, sights, range finders, radioactive luminous compounds, and depleted uranium.

Periodic monitoring did not identify any uncontrolled releases.

There is no historical evidence that radioactive materials have been released to the environment.

The PA/SI and RI/FS have been completed, and according to the Army, no further action is necessary.

The ROD for OU 6, which consists of SWMUs 9 and 18, was signed in September 1994. This area was recommended for no further action.

This area does not pose a public health hazard. Building 659 has been remediated under BRAC.
Operable Unit 7
Pole Transformer PCB Spill Area
(SWMU 5)
This utility pole is located in the Lagoon Area of TEAD, on the west side of the railroad tracks.

As a result of a transformer fire in 1976, PCB oil was released to the surrounding soils.

Soil:
A total of nine soil samples were collected at depths from 0 to 5 feet during the 1994 RI. Some low concentrations of PCBs (0.33 ppm) were detected during the 1984 Installation Environmental Assessment. Dioxins and furans were also detected in the parts per trillion range. None of the soil concentrations exceeded ATSDR's CVs.

PCB Aroclor 1260 (3.5 ppm) was detected from a composite sample from 11 drums of excavated soil.

Shortly after the spill occurred eleven 55-gallon drums of contaminated soil were collected. The excavation area measured approximately 5 feet by 5 feet and 3 feet deep. Clean soil was used to replace the contaminated soil that was removed from the site. The drums were stored at the PCB Storage Building (SWMU 33) and transported off site.

A ROD was signed and remediation, which included covering the site, was completed in 1994.

This area does not pose a public health hazard because the contaminated soil was removed from the site.

Follow-up sampling was conducted to confirm that the low levels of PCBs, dioxins, and furans detected met all regulatory clean-up standards.

Operable Unit 8
Old Burn Area
(SWMU 6)
The old burn area (1,060 feet x 2,100 feet) is located in the south-central portion of the Ordnance Area, along the southern boundary of TEAD.

This area was used for testing, burning, and disposal of hydro carbon filled smoke munitions, fuses, and propellants until the early 1970s. According to site investigations, the old burn area was active for at least 20 years.

There are no groundwater wells near the site and the groundwater flow is generally to the north.

Soil: During the geophysical survey, a total of four soil borings, four surface, and four subsurface samples were collected in May 1988. A total of 92 surface soil samples and 65 subsurface samples were collected during investigations in 1992, 1994, and 1995 from 19 test pits and 74 surface locations.

Arsenic (34 ppm) and lead (12,000 ppm) were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

One explosive compound, Royal Demolition Explosive [RDX] (9.4 ppm) was detected in a subsurface soil sample.

In November 1995, an additional 32 surface soil samples were collected and analyzed for dioxins and furans. These contaminants were detected at very low concentrations and were below ATSDR's CVs.

The RI has been completed. The FS recommended that lead-contaminated soil be excavated and treated on post through solidification/ stabilization, then backfilled. The FS further recommended 5-year site reviews and that deed restrictions be applied to prevent residential use.

All of the former trenches have been filled, and the area has been graded and revegetated. The lead-contaminated soil has not been removed yet.

This area does not pose a public health hazard because the area is not accessible to the public.
Chemical Range
(SWMU 7)
The chemical range is located in the southwestern portion of the ordnance area, west of the Old Burn Area, near the southern boundary of TEAD. Chemical and pyrotechnic-type munitions, excluding agent-filled munitions, were tested and disposed of at this range.

The site consists mainly of three trenches, which were used to dispose of spent munitions (e.g., grenades and canisters, bombs, flare casings, and smoke pots) following testing operations. Testing of munitions in the vicinity of the trenches was conducted from 1942 until the early 1970s.

Surface soil:
During the initial investigation, twelve surface soil samples were collected at 12 locations in close proximity to the uncovered trenches. Samples were analyzed for explosives, inorganics, and SVOCs.

The main contaminants detected in this area were heavy metals. None of the soil samples collected for the RI in 1989 exceeded ATSDR's CVs.

A total of 31 surface samples were collected during two sampling events in 1992 and 1994. Metals were detected in surface soil samples above background levels, however, they did not exceed ATSDR's CVs.

The RI has been completed. The FS recommended 5-year site reviews and that deed restrictions be applied to prevent residential use.

An interim action was completed in November 1997 for the removal of all spent munitions from the trenches. In 1991, the two open trenches were backfilled with the berm materials surrounding the trenches. Components suspected of containing residual explosives were demilitarized at TEAD.

This area does not pose a public health hazard because the area is not accessible to the public and contaminants were not detected at levels of health concern.
Tire Disposal Area
(SWMU 13)
The tire disposal area consists of a large pit from previous gravel-mining operations. The area covers approximately 11 acres in the southern portion of TEAD in the Ordnance Area.

Unreclaimable tires from TEAD vehicles were stored since 1965. In summer 1993, thousands of tires stored in the former gravel-mining pit were removed.

Soil:
Soil Sampling was only conducted during the Phase II RI. A total of 15 surface soil samples and 15 subsurface samples were collected in 1994.

Low concentrations of metals, VOCs, and SVOCs were detected at this site. Arsenic (6.9 ppm) was detected in surface soil above ATSDR's CV.

The RI has been completed. The tires were removed from the site in 1993. The FS recommended 5-year site reviews and that deed restrictions be applied to prevent residential use. This area does not pose a public health hazard because the area is not accessible to the public. The area is no longer used for tire storage.
Building 1303 Washout Pond
(SWMU 22)
This area is located in the southwestern portion of the Ordnance Area, about 0.6-mile north of the southern boundary of TEAD.

Building 1303 was used to disassemble munitions. Rinse water from washout operations resulted in the formation of the pond. Some of the chemicals may have settled out at any point along the flow path from Building 1303 to the pond.

Soil:
During the Phase I and Phase II RI, 30 surface soil samples and 6 subsurface soil samples were collected in 1992 and 1994.

Explosives detected in surface soil above ATSDR's CV included 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) (32,000 ppm) and RDX (1,600 ppm). Metals have been detected mostly at low concentrations below ATSDR's CVs.

Groundwater:
No groundwater samples were collected at this SWMU.

The RI has been completed. The FS recommended 5-year site reviews and that deed restrictions be applied to prevent residential use.

An interim action (soil removal) was completed in November 1977. Confirmatory samples showed very low levels of residual explosives.

This area does not pose a public health hazard because SWMU 22 is a restricted area and is not accessible to the public.

The soil contaminated with explosives is expected to be remediated by TEAD.

Bomb and Shell Reconditioning Building
(SWMU 23)
This area is located in the western portion of TEAD and consists of Buildings 1343, 1344, and 1345.

The main building (Building 1345) was used to perform external work (i.e., reconditioning) of large munitions from the late 1950s to 1977. Reconditioning activities included sand-blasting and painting.

Floor drains in Building 1345 discharged liquids from wash down operations to a ditch northeast of the building. The source of the liquid is suspected to be the boiler from Building 1343.

Soil:
A total of 32 surface soil samples and 34 subsurface samples were collected during the Phase I and Phase II investigations in 1992and in 1994.

Arochlor 1248 (34 ppm) was detected at one location above ATSDR's CVs. Cyanide, metals, and SVOCs have been detected in surface soil samples at levels below ATSDR's CVs. Arsenic (8.2 ppm) was detected above ATSDR's CVs in most surface samples.

Sediment:
Two sediment samples were collected at SWMU 23.

Lead (860 ppm) was detected at one sampling location above EPAs action level for lead in soil.

The RI has been completed. The FS recommended 5-year site reviews and that deed restrictions be applied to prevent residential use. This area does not pose a public health hazard because site-related contaminants were generally below ATSDR's CVs and SWMU 23 is a restricted area and is not accessible to the public.
Old Burn Staging Area
(SWMU 36)
This area consists of a small gravel pit approximately 8 to 13 feet deep immediately north of the Old Burn Area (SWMU 6). This is a grassy area with three bermed revetments located in the eastern portion of (SWMU 36).

This area stored items to be disposed of at the Old Burn Area until the early 1970s.

Four drainage areas run off the north side of SWMU 6, where they are intercepted by a manmade drainage ditch.

Soil:
A total of 31 surface samples and 12 subsurface samples were collected during the Phase I and II investigations in 1992 and 1994.

Arsenic (9.2 ppm) and lead (1,900 ppm) were detected in surface soil above ATSDR's CVs.

The RI has been completed. The FS recommended 5-year site reviews and that deed restrictions be applied to prevent residential use.

This area is no longer used as a staging area for the Old Burn Area. All the trenches have been filled and the area has been revegetated.

This area does not pose a public health hazard because the area is not accessible to the public.
Operable Unit 9
Small Arms Firing Range
(SWMU 8)
This area is located along the extreme western boundary of TEAD.

The range has been used by the National Guard, Army Reserve, Navy, as well as TEAD military personnel for training in the use of small arms (e.g., M-16s, M-60 machine guns, and pistols).

The range was first established in 1942. It is no longer in use. A new small arms firing range was established in 1992, and training is now conducted at this site.

Soil:
A total of 59 surface and 25 subsurface samples were collected in 1992, 1994, and 1995 during Phase I and II investigations.

Arsenic (27 ppm) and lead (46,000 ppm) were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

Elevated levels of lead exist in soils behind the target areas.

The RI has been completed. The FS recommended that lead-contaminated soil be excavated and treated on post through solidification/ stabilization, then backfilled.

The FS also recommended that unexploded ordinance (UXO) clearance be conducted as part of the sites remediation.

The FS further recommended 5-year site reviews and that deed restrictions be applied to prevent residential use.

The small arms firing range is in a remote portion of TEAD and access to the area is restricted. Lead and other contaminants in soil do not pose a public health hazard as long as land use remains the same.

ATSDR recommends that the use of this site be restricted to authorized army personnel only until UXO clearance, remediation, and confirmatory sampling is completed.

Ammunition Equipment Directorate (AED) Test Range
(SWMU 40)
This site is located in the northwestern portion of TEAD, approximately 0.6 mile from the depot's northwest boundary. The area consists of several revetments, a drop tower, and an observation bunker.

This range was used for the testing of munitions, bombs, and rocket engines. The range was operational from around 1950 until about 1981. The area is no longer used for testing and is not in close proximity to active depot operations.

Soil:
A total of 84 surface and 136 subsurface samples were collected in 1992, 1994, and in 1995 during the Phase I and II investigations.

Several explosives were detected at this site. RDX (3,200 ppm) was detected above ATSDR's CV.

The RI has been completed. The FS recommended removal of RDX-contaminated soil and off-post disposal. UXO clearance is included in the FS recommendation. The FS further recommended 5-year site reviews and that deed restrictions be applied to prevent residential use.

The Army plans to fence the site and place signs warning of potential UXO hazard. Future plans may include UXO removal authorized under a new Army program (Military Munitions Response Program). There have been no appropriations for removal actions under this program.

This area does not pose a public health hazard because contaminated soil has been removed, the area is very remote, and any remaining contaminants are not accessible to the public.
Operable Unit 10
Box Elder Wash Drum Site
(SWMU 41)
This site is located in the Igloo Storage Area near the north central corner of TEAD. The distance between the drum site and the northwestern boundary, where the Box Elder Wash exits the depot, is approximately 1.2 miles.

There were 57 drums disposed of in the Box Elder Wash stream bed. The drums were in various stages of deterioration and contained a black tarry substance that resembled roofing tar.

The primary source of flow in this wash is snow melt from nearby mountains. The wash terminates in an area 1.3 miles north of the TEAD boundary and does not appear to discharge into any surface water bodies.

Samples of the drums contents were collected and analyzed in April 1989. SVOCs and metals were detected in samples taken from drums.

Surface soil:
Surface soil samples were collected and none contained levels of contaminants that exceeded ATSDR's CVs.

A ROD for OU 10, which consists of SWMU 41, was signed in September 1994. The drums have been removed and affected soils have been excavated. This area does not pose a public health hazard because the area has been remediated.
Known release SWMUs
Former Industrial Wastewater Lagoon (IWL)
(SWMU 2)
The IWL is located in the eastern portion of TEAD. It was an unlined 400- by 200-foot evaporation pond that received wastewater from various industrial operations.

This lagoon, which was used from 1965 until November 1988, discharged an average of more than 140,000 gallons of industrial wastewater and storm water per day.

Samples were collected from the wastewater stream as early as 1982 and tested for VOCs and explosive compounds. Routine groundwater monitoring is conducted for VOCs, metals, and explosives.

Soil:
During the Phase II RFI, three soil borings were drilled at the decontamination facility to a depth of 5 feet. Samples were collected at the surface (0 - 1 foot), at a depth of 3 feet, and at 5 feet. The samples were analyzed for metals, VOCs, SVOCs. Samples were collected near the IWL ditches.

SVOCs and metals were detected at levels below ATSDR's CVs.

Groundwater:
Arsenic (98 ppb), benzene (7 ppb), cadmium (60 ppb), carbon tetrachloride (52 ppb), chloromethane (12 ppb), chromium (21,400 ppb), 1,1-dichloroethene (4.2 ppb), lead (160 ppb), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (200 ppb), 1,1,1-trichloroethylene (50,000 ppb) and trichloroethene (250 ppb)

Groundwater Plume:
A contaminant plume covering approximately 1,700 acres has been identified beneath and downgradient of the IWL and wastewater ditches.

A two-stage cleanup for closure of the ditches and lagoon was completed in 1989. The ditches were capped with an impermeable synthetic liner and backfilled with clean soil. The lagoon was capped with clay, a synthetic liner, and clean soil; both areas were revegetated.

A groundwater pumping and treatment system was installed in 1993. This system, using 13 extraction wells and 13 injection wells, treats 5,000 gallons of groundwater per minute. The system extracts contaminated groundwater, treats it using air strippers, and reinjects the clean water outside the northern plume periphery.

This area does not pose a public health hazard for exposures resulting from contact with soil. Corrective measures have been taken and the surface soils do not contain contaminants at levels that would be harmful.

Groundwater in the eastern and northeastern boundary area has been contaminated and the plume has migrated slightly beyond the north-central boundary and northeastern boundary of TEAD. The plume, which is primarily TCE, does not pose a public health hazard because there are no off-site drinking water wells in close proximity to the northern boundary of TEAD.

Former X-ray Lagoon
(SWMU 3)

 

This lagoon is located in the Ammunition Workshop Area across from Building 1223. The dimensions are approximately 75 feet long by 35 feet wide and 6 feet deep.

This lagoon, which was constructed in 1974, received wastewater from the film processing building. The X-ray Lagoon received wastes from the film development process until 1990.

All water that was discharged from the building was transported to the lagoon through an 8-inch ceramic pipe. During its period of operation (approximately 15 years), the X-ray Lagoon was estimated to receive approximately 252,000 gallons of wastewater and film processing waste.

Initial sampling of the X-ray Lagoon occurred in May 1983. Effluent samples were collected and analyzed for eight metals and six pesticides. Additional sampling was conducted in March 1990.

For the Phase II RFI investigation sediment samples were collected from the pond floor and soil borings were collected from several locations. Samples were analyzed for VOCs, SVOCs, metals, and in some cases for explosives.

Three rounds of groundwater sampling were conducted during 1993 and 1994. Five samples were collected during each of the rounds.

Soil:
Metals were found in surface soils above background. SVOCs were also detected in surface soils. Soil contaminants were not detected above ATSDR's CVs.

Sediment
Lead (440 ppm) was detected above EPAs action level used for lead in soil.

Groundwater:
Arsenic (37 ppb), lead (350 ppb), and chromium (3,500 ppb) were detected in groundwater monitoring wells above background. According to the investigation report, the high levels of metals found in wells was due to corroded stainless steel pipes.

The Phase I and II Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigations (RFIs) are complete. The Army has plans to remove the septic tank. Additional semi-annual groundwater sampling and evaluation of the septic system were called for during the corrective measures study (CMS). The site is fenced off and access to TEAD is restricted. This area does not pose a public health hazard for exposures resulting from contact with soils.

There are no drinking water wells in close proximity to this area. The source of higher than background levels of some metals in groundwater was determined to be a result of corroded stainless steel pipes.

TNT Washout Facility
(SWMU 10)

 

This area is located in the south central portion of the Depot and consists of the bomb reconditioning building (Building 1245), the former storage facility (Building 1246), old TNT washout ponds, and the new TNT washout pond.

The facility was constructed in 1948 and remained active until 1986. The facility was only active for approximately 6 months from 1966 through 1984.

Four former TNT washout ponds were closed in the fall of 1984 and have been filled and covered with clean soil.

Soil/Sediment: During the PA/SI that was conducted in 1985 and 1986, 13 surface soil -samples were collected and an additional 12 soil samples were collected at varying depths from four soil borings.

During the RI, 16 soil borings were drilled at the TNT Washout Facility. A total of 26 soil samples from various depths were collected from 12 of the soil borings.

During the Phase II RFI 34 additional soil borings were drilled and 337 soil samples were collected at various depths.

Two sediment samples were collected during the PA/SI.

2,4,6-Trinitrobenzene (20,700 ppm) was detected above ATSDR's CV in sediment.

Groundwater:
Five groundwater samples were collected during the PA/SI and sampled for VOCs, SVOCs, explosives, and metals.

During the RI, a total of nine monitoring wells were sampled for explosives: two shallow and 7 deep wells.

During the Phase II RFI, 11 groundwater monitoring wells were sampled and analyzed for VOCs, SVOCs, explosives, and metals.

Nitrate (264,000 ppb), methylene chloride (20 ppb), 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (37 ppb), and RDX (270 ppb) have been detected above ATSDR's CVs.

Surface Water: One surface water sample was collected during the PA/SI. No contaminants were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

The Phase I and II RFI are complete. The ponds were fenced in 1995.

There is a synthetic liner that covers the former TNT washout ponds.

Groundwater monitoring is conducted on a semi-annual basis.

High concentrations of explosives have been detected in the upper 3 feet of soil/sediment within the former washout ponds. TNT, HMX, and RDX have migrated to the ground- water, but appear to be confined to the site.

This area does not pose a public health hazard because TEAD is fenced and the SWMUs are not accessible to off-site residents.

Laundry Effluent Pond
(SWMU 11)

 

The Laundry Effluent Pond is located north of the TNT Washout Building in the south central portion of the Depot. The site also includes a septic tank and leach field, sewage pond, sand pit, and waste piles.

These ponds received wastewater from facility buildings. The effluent was discharged into the pond until 1990. From 1990 to 1993, laundry effluent was transported to the Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant (IWTP) for treatment and disposal. All laundry operations are currently conducted at an off-site commercial location.

Waste piles were identified east of the ponds. Debris from these waste piles include metal scraps, oil

Two rounds of sampling were conducted for this site.

Round 1 identified a number of waste piles containing old oil filters, brake pads, and other assorted wastes.

Pond sediment and surface water samples were collected during the first round of sampling.

Soil borings were drilled to depths up to 15 feet and soil samples were collected at various intervals (e.g., 5, 10, and 15 feet).

During Round 2, a 75 by 75 foot grid was established where 20 surface samples were collected within the grid. The samples were analyzed for TPH and metals. In addition, five soil borings were drilled in waste pile areas during Round 2.

In addition, existing groundwater monitoring wells in the SWMU 1o and 11 area were sampled during both sampling rounds.

The laundry pond, sewage pond, and septic tank were found to contain explosives, metals, SVOCs, and VOCs. There exists the possibility of leakage from the septic tank pipeline.

Lead was detected above ATSDR's CV in the waste piles at a maximum concentration of 14,000 ppm. Some VOCs and SVOCs were also detected at levels above ATSDR's CVs.

Lead was also detected in a surface water sample (59 ppm) above EPAs action level.

The Phase I and II RFI are complete. Further evaluation of the septic system is recommended as part of the CMS. Semi-annual groundwater monitoring and sampling are recommended. This area does not pose a public health hazard because TEAD is fenced and SWMU 11 is not accessible to off-site residents and is restricted to on-site personnel. The site is not within the BRAC parcel and the land use is not expected to change.
Pesticide Disposal Area
(SWMU 12)
SWMU 12 is located within the area of the sanitary landfill (SWMU 15). The precise location has not been determined.

According to reports, the area was a trench where barrels containing small amounts of pesticides were emptied prior to disposal.

No evidence of pesticide waste disposal was identified during the Round 1 field investigation activities.

See sanitary landfill (SWMU 15) for investigation results. No further investigations specifically designed to locate the Pesticide Disposal Area are planned. Although pesticides were detected in soil samples throughout the entire landfill, a designated area containing higher concentrations of pesticides was not identified. It was recommended in the 1996 RCRA Facility Investigation Report that future studies regard the Pesticide Disposal Area and Sanitary Landfill as a single SWMU. See SWMU 15 for ATSDR's evaluation of public health hazards for SWMU 12.
Sanitary Landfill
(SWMU 15)

 

This site is located at the southern end of the open revetment area in the east central portion of TEAD.

The landfill is approximately 100 acres and has been in operation since 1942.

The landfill has received both hazardous and non-hazardous wastes during its operation. The landfill was closed in the spring of 1994 for all waste disposal except for construction rubble and debris.

Results reported below were from initial sampling during the installation of monitoring wells and the Phase II RFI. In 1990, soil samples were collected and analyzed from soil borings associated with 6 monitoring wells.

During the Phase II field investigation 30 surface soil samples (0-6 inches) were collected and 15 test pits were excavated and analyzed for VOCs, SVOCs, metals, pesticides, and PCBs.

Surface soil:
Arsenic (200 ppm), benzo [A] anthracene (27 ppm),and lead (920 ppm) were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

Most VOCs, SVOCs, pesticides, and PCBs were detected in some surface soil samples at concentrations below ATSDR's CVs.

Groundwater: Trichloroethylene [TCE] (300 ppb), dieldrin (0.008 ppb), and, bis (2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (790 ppb) were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

Air Monitoring:
Four air-monitoring stations were placed in upwind and downwind locations within the Sanitary Landfill.

Particulate samples were collected during three rounds of sampling and analyzed for total suspended particulates. VOC samples were collected for the last two rounds of sampling.

Metals and VOCs were detected at low concentrations.

TCE was not detected in any of the air samples.

The Phase I and II RFI are complete. The groundwater pathway should be evaluated in the CMS. Semi-annual groundwater monitoring and sampling are recommended.

A soil cover was placed over the landfill. The proposed remedy is to improve the drainage in the landfill and add additional soil cover.

This area does not pose a public health hazard for exposures resulting from contact with soils.

SWMU 15 is not located within BRAC property, there are no occupied buildings on the landfill property, and access to this area is restricted.

Battery Pit
(SWMU 24)
The battery pit is located in the southeastern portion of TEAD, just north of the Administration Area. It consists of Building 507 and an 8-foot-wide by 12-foot-long by 8-foot-deep pit reportedly southeast of the building.

Electrolytes from lead-acid batteries were discharged through a floor drain into this unlined battery pit from 1965 until 1980. The battery pit is now covered with asphalt. A concrete sump containing sediment was found near the suspected location of the battery pit.

During the Phase II investigation, one test pit was excavated and two soil borings were drilled in order to characterize the extent soil contamination at the battery pit. A total of 10 subsurface soil samples were collected within the test pit at depths ranging between 11/2 feet to 20 feet. Soil samples were collected from the soil borings ranging between 5 and 20 feet. One sludge sample was collected from the sump at the edge of the test pit.

Elevated concentrations of some metals were found in soil underneath asphalt. Lead (580 ppm) was detected above EPA's action level of 400 ppm for lead in residential soil. No other contaminants were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

The Phase I and II RFI are complete. The Army has plans to remove the sump and piping, so no further action is required.

The drain was sealed to ensure that the source of contamination was eliminated. The presence of asphalt covering the SWMU 24 area minimizes the infiltration of water to subsurface soils and reduces the potential for vertical migration of contaminants to the water table.

This area does not pose a public health hazard because the area has been covered with asphalt and is not accessible to the public.
Battery Shop
(SWMU 25)

 

The battery shop is located in Building 1252 in the south central portion of TEAD.

The shop has been used for the maintenance and repair of vehicle and forklift batteries since 1980.

Discharges from batteries to the ground surface occurred until about 1990. Currently, all waste and wastewater are containerized and disposed of at the IWTP.

During a March 1990 investigation by TEAD personnel, five surface soil samples and two subsurface samples (collected at 2 feet bgs) were collected at different locations within SWMU 25. All samples were analyzed for metals and VOCs.

During the round 1 Phase II RFI, soil borings were drilled to a depth of 5 feet. Twelve soil samples were collected from the borings at depths ranging from surface (i.e., 0-6 inches ) to 5 feet. One surface sample was also collected at the base of each washdown pad. All samples were analyzed for metals.

During round 2 of the Phase II RFI 20 additional surface samples were collected, two 20 foot soil boring, four soil borings drilled to depths of 5 feet adjacent to the pipeline, and four borings drilled to a depth of 10 feet drilled near the washdown pads.

Surface Soil:
High concentrations of lead (33,251 ppm) and arsenic (32.8 ppm) were detected above ATSDR's CVs. Low concentrations of other metals were found. No VOCs were detected in surface soil samples.

The Phase I and II RFI are complete. A CMS is recommended. A fence has been installed around the contaminated drainage areas. This area does not pose a past or current public health hazard because the area is not accessible to the public.

The Battery Shop is not within the BRAC parcel and there are no plans for alternative uses of this land.

Lead in surface soil needs to be remediated to acceptable state and federal standards prior to any future reuse of this area.

Old Industrial Wastewater Lagoon (OIWL)
(SWMU 30)
The OIWL is located just west of the Maintenance Area, just outside the BRAC parcel boundary.

From the 1940s through 1965, this area was used for discharges of liquid wastes containing solvents and heavy metals. The IWL (SWMU 2) replaced the OIWL in 1965.

A total of seven lagoons and former standing liquid areas and several discharge ditches were identified.

Soil: A total of 83 soil borings were drilled and 162 samples were collected from within 7 lagoons and 7 ditches. The samples were analyzed for VOCs and metals with some selected samples analyzed for SVOCs.

Groundwater contamination was studied as a part of the IWL (SWMU2) investigation.

Some metals were detected in soil samples above background concentrations. Lead (690 ppm) was detected above EPA's action level in residential soil. Toluene was the only VOC detected and it was not detected at levels that exceed ATSDR's CV.

The Phase I and II RFI are complete. A CMS is recommended. Removal action is underway by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to clean-up contaminated soils. Groundwater pumping and treatment is ongoing.

Approximately 40 of the 704 monitoring wells are sampled semi-annually. The sampled wells are selected on the basis of which wells will best delineate the TCE plume.

This area does not pose a public health hazard for exposures resulting from contact with soils.

SWMU 30 is located just to the west of BRAC property and access to this area is restricted.

Groundwater contamination originating from the OIWL does not pose a public health hazard. It continues to be extensively characterized as part of the IWL investigations; the TCE plume is monitored and an extraction well limits the potential for off site migration.

Suspected Release SWMUs
Open Burning Open Detonation (OB/OD) Main Demolition Area
(SWMU 1)
The Main Demolition Area is located in the extreme western portion of the depot south of the rifle range.

The area has been used in the past for open burning and detonation of munitions. The area is currently used for the demilitarization of bombs and other explosive munitions.

Soil sampling was conducted at four test pits in 1981during a Phase II investigation conducted by the Army Environmental Hygiene Agency (AEHA). Six surface soil samples were collected from each of the four pits. Samples were analyzed for explosives and metals.

During the Phase I RFI investigation 176 soil samples were collected at depths ranging from ground surface to 10 feet below ground surface (bgs). In addition, four 100-foot soil borings were completed at SMWU 1 and 1a, and seven soil samples were submitted for analyses.

No sampling was conducted during the Phase II RFI investigation.

Surface soil:
Arsenic (29 ppm), cadmium (203 ppm), and lead (68,000 ppm) were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

RDX (2,000 ppm), 1,3-dinitrobenzene (910 ppm), and 2,4,6- TNT (11,000 ppm) were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

UXO:
During previous investigations, certain types of ordnance and uncased explosives were identified in or near the trash burn pits.

Currently the area is on an interim status under a RCRA Part B permit application. Further environmental sampling is deferred because this area is still operational. In the event that the OB/OD operations are discontinued, the Army will conduct an environmental assessment for the site. Soil contamination in this area does not pose a past or current public health hazard because the area is located in a remote portion of the depot and is not accessible to the public.

Past OD operations did result in scrap metal being deposited immediately adjacent to this area. The Army changed their operation to ensure all material now remains on TEAD property.

ATSDR evaluated the potential for airborne contaminants released during OB/OD operations to affect the health of residents who live near TEAD. The evaluation indicates that current operations at TEAD do not pose a public health hazard. There is a limited amount of environmental data to evaluate past OB/OD operations.

At this time, future land use for this area of TEAD is not expected to change. If other land uses (e.g., industrial, residential or agriculture) are considered in the future, the potential public health hazards would need to be reevaluated.

Open Burn/Open Detonation (OB/OD) Area, Cluster Bomb Detonation Area
(SWMU 1a)

 

This area is comprised of two small areas, totaling approximately 25 acres, along the western side of the Main Demolition Area (SWMU 1).

SWMU 1a is physically contained within the larger demolition area (SWMU 1).

This area was reportedly used during the early to mid-1970s for the demilitarization of munitions. The area is currently covered by vegetation and is no longer used for demilitarization activities.

This area was investigated in conjunction with SWMU 1.

The U.S. Army Environmental Hygiene Agency collected and analyzed four surface soil samples in 1981 during a four- phase study of OB/OD areas nationwide. The samples were analyzed for six explosive compounds and EP toxicity of the eight RCRA metals.

During the Phase I RFI sampling, six test pits were excavated and two soil samples were collected from each test pit. In addition, one 100-foot soil boring was completed and seven samples were collected at various depths ranging from 5 feet to 100 feet. All samples were analyzed for metals and explosives, and some selected samples were analyzed for VOCs, SVOC, and dioxins/furans. This area has very low concentrations of contamination below ATSDR's CVs.

Currently the area is on an interim status under a RCRA Part B permit application. Further environmental sampling is deferred pending future closure activities. See public health hazard evaluation for the Main Demolition Area (SWMU 1).
OB/OD Area, Burn Pad
(SWMU 1b)
This area is located at the OB/OD area, in the southwest corner of TEAD.

The burn pad was approximately 300 feet by 100 feet in size. The area was formerly used for open burning of propellant and munitions. These practices were discontinued in 1977.

The U.S. Army Environmental Hygiene Agency collected and analyzed 14 surface and near surface soil samples during the Phase II study in 1981. The samples were analyzed for six explosive compounds and EP toxicity

During Phase I RFI six test pits were excavated and two soil samples were collected for sampling from each test pit. In addition, one 100-foot soil boring was drilled, with seven soil samples collected from various depths.

No contaminants were identified above ATSDR's CVs.

Groundwater was not sampled at this SWMU due to the large depth to reach the water table.

The area has been regraded and revegetated.

The CMS work plan suggests that land use restrictions should be put in place.

This area does not pose a public health hazard because concentrations of contaminants were very low and it is located in a remote area which is not accessible to the public.
OB/OD Area, Trash Burn Pits
(SWMU 1c)

 

The trash burn pits are located at the OB/OD area, in the southwest corner of TEAD . The pits were generally 8 to 10 feet wide and 4 to 6 feet deep and could be several hundred feet in length.

This area was used in the past for open burning of waste packaging material that may have been contaminated with explosives. Large pits were excavated and filled with waste materials to be burned. When the pit was filled with ash and debris, it was covered and regraded.

The pits are no longer used for any disposal activities. According to TEAD personnel, disposal activities ceased in the late 1980s.

Soil:
Three samples were collected from the trash burn pits during the AEHA Phase II sampling. An additional 36 samples, including eight surface soil samples, were collected during Phase IV of the AEHA study.

A total of 47 samples were collected during the Phase I RFI. These samples were collected from various depths.

One explosive, RDX (47 ppm), was detected in surface soil at a concentration exceeding ATSDR's CV.

Lead (4,400 ppm) was detected in subsurface samples above EPA's action level for lead in soil.

UXO:
During previous investigations, certain types of ordnance and uncased explosives were identified in or near the trash burn pits.
The CMS work plan suggests that land use restrictions should be put in place if land use should change. This area does not pose a public health hazard because it is located in a remote area and access to this area is restricted to authorized base personnel involved in OB/OD activities.

This determination is based on current land use and it is expected that the land use will remain the same.

OB/OD Area, Propellant Burn Pans
(SWMU 1d)
The propellant burn pads covered an area approximately 600 feet by 200 feet.

The area is currently used for open burning of propellants. The only wastes disposed of at this site are the propellants that are burned there.

Soil:
A total of 14 soil samples were collected (seven surface and seven subsurface) and one 100-foot soil boring was drilled during the Phase I RFI.

Lead (2,030 ppm) was detected above EPA's action level for lead in surface soil. No other contaminants were identified above ATSDR's CVs.

Currently the area is on an interim status under a RCRA Part B permit application. Further environmental sampling is deferred because this area is still operational. In the event that the OB/OD operations are discontinued, the Army will conduct an environmental assessment for the site. This area does not pose a public health hazard because it is located in a remote area and is not accessible to the public.
Sand Blast Areas
(SWMU 4)
Two primary sandblast areas are located in the maintenance area of TEAD. These areas are within Buildings 615, 617, 617A, and 600.

This area is used for vehicular maintenance including sandblasting, painting, and stripping. Spent sandblasting material is collected in sealed hoppers temporarily until removed by an off-site hazardous waste contractor. Paint stripping waste was dumped into floor drains that discharged into the IWL.

Soil:
Phase I investigations included the collection of six surface soil samples. All samples were analyzed for VOCs, SVOCs, and metals.

During the Phase II investigation, at total of 36 soil borings (three soil samples from each boring) and 60 surface samples were collected from soil immediately below the concrete or asphalt pavement around the buildings. In addition, 15 surface soil samples were collected from drainage swales or ditches that received surface water runoff from the sandblast area. Samples were analyzed for metals, VOCs, and SVOCs.

Antimony (22.5 ppm), arsenic (30 ppm), lead (9,400 ppm), and cadmium (260 ppm) were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

The Phase I and II RFI were completed.

During the Phase II RFI, no sandblasting activities were being conducted at Building 600. The sandblasting equipment has been removed.

This area does not pose a public health hazard under the current land use conditions. The access to the area is restricted and it is used for industrial operations only.

SWMU 4 is within the BRAC parcel. However, the land use is not expected to change. If the Tooele Redevelopment Authority proposes that the area be considered for other uses (e.g., recreational, commercial, or residential), environmental sampling results will need to be re-evaluated to ensure that the area is safe for the proposed land use.

Sewage Lagoons
(SWMU 14)
The sewage lagoons are located on the western side of the Maintenance Area of TEAD. Each lagoon covers approximately 7.3 acres and is 4 feet deep with a holding capacity of around 9 million gallons.

The lagoons, which were constructed in 1974, receive domestic wastewater from housing, maintenance, and administrative buildings. These lagoons are currently active.

During the Phase I and Phase II RFIs, sediment, surface water, and groundwater samples were collected at SWMU 14.

Sediments:
Arsenic (37 ppm) and lead (640 ppm)were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

Groundwater:
TCE (32 ppb), bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthlate (28 ppb), and several metals such as chromium (12,000 ppb), nickel (2,100 ppb), and lead (117 ppb) were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

The Phase I and II RFI were completed. Institutional controls are currently in place and lagoons are inspected regularly. If lagoons are taken out of service, additional evaluation will be necessary.

Based on investigations of the site, wastewater from the lagoons do not appear to be the contributing source of VOCs detected in the groundwater. Other contaminant sources in the vicinity of the sewage lagoons (e.g., Industrial Waste Lagoon) have been identified as the primary contributor of VOCs in the groundwater plume.

The sewage lagoons are surrounded by an 8-foot chain link fence and the gate is always locked. Access to the area is restricted and only authorized personnel are allowed within the fenced area. This area does not pose a public health hazard from contact with soil or sediment.

None of the drinking water wells are downgradient of contaminated groundwater. Results of drinking water tests meet state and federal safe drinking water standards (SDWS).

Ammunition and Engineering Directorate (AED) Demilitarization Test Facility (SWMU 19) This site is located southwest of the Ordnance Area in a very remote area of the depot. The facility was constructed in 1973 and comprises six small buildings, sheds, and a series of revetments.

The facility is used for demilitarization, propagation, and barricade testing. According to past investigations, the site is in use approximately 30 days per year.

Surface soil:
During the Phase I RFI, 12 surface samples were collected and analyzed for metals, explosives, VOCs, SVOCs, and anions. No additional samples were conducted during the Phase II RFI.

Localized and low concentrations of metals and SVOCs were detected. Arsenic (10.8 ppm) and RDX (8.4 ppm) were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

Groundwater samples were not collected during the SWMU19 investigations.

The Phase I RFI was completed. A CMS is recommended that should focus on site controls. This area does not pose a public health hazard because the area is not accessible to the public and most of the contaminants were detected at levels that are not harmful.
AED Deactivation Furnace Site
(SWMU 20)
This site is located southwest of the Ordnance Area along the road that links the AED Demilitarization Test Facility (SWMU 19)and the Bomb and Shell Reconditioning Building (SWMU 23).

The site is used for testing demilitarization procedures for munitions. The facility contains two furnaces, a large air pollution control system, and a small storage building.

Soil:
During the Phase I RFI, 11 surface soil samples were collected from around the perimeter of the facility and five samples were collected from beneath the asphalt surface of the Deactivation Furnace. Samples were analyzed for metals, VOCs, SVOCs, and explosives.

During the Phase II RFI, 9 additional surface soil samples were collected for chromium and dioxins/furans analyses. A total of 21 soil borings were also drilled to a depth of 3 feet and a total of 57 soil samples were collected at depths ranging from 0-3 feet. These soil samples were analyzed for metals and explosives.

Arsenic (14 ppm) and lead (21,000) were detected in surface soil above ATSDR's CVs.

The CMS recommends land use restrictions alone or with asphalt cover, or excavation and soil treatment. This area does not pose a public health hazard because the area is located in a remote location at the western portion of the Depot and is not accessible to the public. Only authorized personnel are allowed access to this area.
Deactivation Furnace Building 1320
(SWMU 21)
This building is located in the southwestern portion of TEAD, near the southwestern perimeter of the Igloo Storage Area.

The deactivation furnace was constructed around 1955 and consists of a building that houses a rotary kiln and open staging areas around the outside of the building.

The building is used for deactivating small arms ammunition, primers, and fusers.

Surface soil:
Ten surface soil samples were collected during the Phase I RFI. No additional samples were collected during the Phase II investigation. One surface water sample and two sediment samples were collected in 1993.

Arsenic (4.3 ppm) and lead (63,000 ppm) were detected in surface soil above ATSDR's CVs.

The CMS recommends land use restrictions with asphalt cover or excavation and soil treatment.

An air pollution control system was installed in 1975 to reduce emissions from the furnace.

This area does not pose a public health hazard because the area is not accessible to the public. SWMU 21 is not located within the BRAC parcel boundary and no other uses are planned for this area.
Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office (DRMO) Storage Yard (SWMU 26)

SWMU 26 includes the following buildings:

- Building 2025 - Flammable Storage

- Battery Storage Yard

- Empty Drum Storage

- Four small sheds

- Waste oil

- Scrap metal storage

The DRMO area is located in the eastern section of the Maintenance Area. The site is a 60-acre fenced yard containing several buildings.

This flat, unpaved area is used for the temporary storage of various waste materials. Several corrugated steel buildings are located on site. Small quantities of hazardous material were temporarily stored here. Site inspection in 1981 reported three ruptured drums and noticeable ground staining.

Soil:
During the Phase I RFI, 45 surface soil samples and 15 shallow soil samples (1 foot bgs) were analyzed for VOCs, SVOCs, metals, and cyanide.

Also, during the Phase II RFI 15 surface soil samples and 15 subsurface samples (2.5 feet bgs) from areas surrounding Buildings 2002 and 2003 were collected. These samples were only analyzed for lead.

Arsenic (21 ppm) and lead (1,140 ppm) were detected above ATSDR's CVs. Some metals and SVOCs were also detected at levels below ATSDR's CVs.

The Phase I and II RFI were completed. A CMS is planned and should be focused toward site management. This area does not pose a public health hazard because the area is fenced and not accessible to the public.
RCRA Container Storage Area
(SWMU 27)
This site is located in the Administration Area. It consists of a locked building, surrounded by a perimeter fence. The building was constructed in 1986.

The facility is currently used and regulated under interim status for long-term storage of hazardous waste generated at TEAD. Wastes that require treatment before disposal are stored in this building. The containers are routinely inspected to ensure that contaminants are not leaking.

An investigation of this area was conducted during the Phase I RI during the early 1980s. No environmental sampling or additional investigations were conducted because the area was classified as a "no action" SWMU due to no known releases or visual indications of contaminants identified. No further actions are necessary. This area does not pose a public health hazard. The area is fenced, not accessible to the public, and there is no evidence that chemicals have been released into the environment at levels of concern.
Ninety-Day Drum Storage Area
(SWMU 28)
This site is a 3.4-acre fenced lot near the southern end of the Maintenance Area.

Before 1983, this area was used for vehicle storage. Since then, the fenced lot is used for drummed storage of gasoline, paint wastes, thinners, solvents, paint filters, blast grit, used oil, and antifreeze. Drums are sealed and stored for up to 90 days, then moved to permanent storage.

Surface soil:
During the Phase I RFI, eight surface soil samples were collected from areas where ground staining was observed. Samples were analyzed for metals, total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons (TRPH), SVOCs, and VOCs.

During the Phase II RFI, 16 5-foot soil borings were drilled and two soil samples were collected and analyzed from each soil boring, one surface and the other at 5 feet bgs.

Some metals were detected in surface soil samples below ATSDR's CVs. TRPH (2,290 ppm) was also detected.

The Phase I and II RFI were completed. A CMS was recommended, with a focus toward site management. This area does not pose a public health hazard because the area is fenced and not accessible to the public.
Drum Storage Areas
(SWMU 29)
This site consists of two storage areas (northern and southern) located near the southern end of the Maintenance Area. The two areas are separated by the Maintenance and Supply Road.

The southern area is a fenced 25-acre lot containing one building (Building 576). This gravel and broken asphalt area is fenced and was used for storage of drums and some disabled vehicles. Now the area is used for vehicle storage.

The northern area is approximately 5 acres of open sparsely vegetated land. Drums and old vehicles have historically been stored in this area. These storage areas have been used at least since 1953.

Soil: During the 1989 RI, at total of 24 soil samples were collected from eight locations across the site at depths ranging from 0 to 2 feet.

During the Phase I RFI, 37 shallow soil borings were drilled to 5 feet bgs. Samples were analyzed for VOCs, SVOCs, explosives, metals, pesticides, PCBs, and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH).

Arsenic (28 ppm) was detected in surface soil above its CV. Low concentrations of SVOCs and DDT were detected in surface soils at levels below ATSDR's CVs. TPHs (945 ppm) were also detected in surface soil.

Groundwater: No VOCs or explosives were detected. Some metals did exceed background concentrations in groundwater.

A Phase I RFI was completed, a Phase II RFI is ongoing. A CMS is recommended, with a focus on site management. These storage areas do not pose a public health hazard because they are not accessible to the public and contaminants in soil were not detected at levels of concern.
Pesticide Handling and Storage Area (SWMU 34) This site is located in Building 518 in the Administration Area.

This area was used for storage and mixing /formulation of pesticides and herbicides since about 1942.

The building has been decommissioned and the building is no longer used to store or handle pesticides and herbicides.

The storage area measuring 75 feet by 75 feet is secured with a chain link fence.

Soil:
During the Phase I RFI, six surface soil samples were collected from beneath the discharge pipe and other areas around Building 518. All samples were analyzed for pesticides, herbicides, cyanide, and metals.

During the Phase II RFI, 13 soil borings were drilled around the site and a total of 43 soil samples were collected and analyzed during this investigation.

Lead (1,120 ppm), arsenic (42 ppm), p,p-DDE (24 ppm), and p,p-DDT (160 ppm) were detected in surface soil above ATSDR's CVs.

The CMS recommends land use restrictions alone, or with fencing and soil cover, or with excavation and off-site disposal.

There are no current discharges from the storage area.

This storage area does not pose a public health hazard because it is fenced and not accessible to the public.
Contaminated Waste Processing Plant (CWP)
(SWMU 37)
The CWP Plant is an incinerator which was installed around 1980. It is located in the southwestern portion of TEAD

The plant consists of one large building (Building 1325), a smaller storage building, and adjacent staging and storage areas. The plant, including the surrounding paved staging area, is about 150 feet X 125 feet in size and is surrounded by a 4-foot high fence.

The plant was designed for flashing scrap metals and incinerating material.

Soil:
During the Phase I RFI, 12 surface soil samples were collected and analyzed for metals, VOCs, SVOCs, dioxins/furans, and explosives.

During the Phase II RFI, seven boreholes were collected and an additional eight surface samples were collected and analyzed for SVOCs and dioxins/furans.

Very low concentrations of SVOCs and dioxins/furans were detected in surface soil, however, none were above ATSDR's CVs.

The CMS recommends land use restrictions.

The incinerator has an air pollution control system which has been in use during its entire operation.

This incinerator does not pose a public health hazard. It is fenced, not accessible to the public, and is located in a remote area of TEAD.
Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant (IWTP)
(SWMU 38)
The plant is located in the east central portion of TEAD between the Maintenance and Supply Area and the Administration Area.

The plant has been used for industrial wastewater treatment since 1988.

Treatment of wastewater includes air strippers for VOCs, a flocculator and clarifier for settling out metals, sand filters for filtering solids, and granular activated carbon to remove VOCs and SVOCs. Approximately 80 percent of the treated waste water was recycled and reused in the Industrial Area.

During the Phase I RFI, six soil samples were collected from the IWTP. Four samples were collected from surface soils on the west side of the plant. The samples were analyzed for metals, VOCs, and SVOCs.

No additional sampling was deemed necessary during the Phase II investigation.

Surface soils:
Arsenic (10 ppm) was detected above its CV.

The Phase I and II RFI were completed. No further action was recommended since contaminant levels were below Utah criteria. The IWTP does not pose a public health hazard because contaminants in soil are not at levels that would pose a health concern under the current land use and access to the area is restricted.
Solvent Recovery Factory
(SWMU 39)
The Solvent Recovery Factory (Building 600c) is located on the west side of the Maintenance Area of TEAD.

The factory was built in 1988 and received up to 10,500 gallons of waste solvents for processing annually. Solvents that are currently recycled include: 1,1,1- trichloroethane, Stoddard solvent, polyurethane thinner, and lacquer thinner.

There have not been any reported incidents or spills of reportable quantities at this facility.

An investigation of this area was conducted during the Phase I RI during the early 1980s. No additional investigations were conducted because the area was classified as a "no action" SWMU due to no contaminants of concern identified.

Soil:
The ground surface surrounding the facility is paved.

No contaminants were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

The Phase I RFI was completed, and no future response is planned. The Solvent Recovery Facility does not pose a public health hazard because safety features have been built into the building to prevent releases of contaminants. A berm surrounding the hazardous waste storage area was constructed in the early 1990s and has reduced the potential of contamination from leaks or spills. The site is also paved and any leaks onto the pavement would likely not impact groundwater.
Bomb Washout Building
(SWMU 42)

 

The Bomb Washout Building (Building 539) is located in the southeastern portion of TEAD- N, between the Maintenance Area and the Administration Area.

Between the 1940s and early 1960s, projectiles from small arms munitions were burned in a furnace within the building. Wash water containing ash particulates and spilled molten lead was discharged via a steel-lined concrete flume about 10 feet north of the building into an open ditch.

The furnace was in operation until about 1960. During its operation, heavy particulates from smoke settled out to a nearby "drop-out box" located on the roof of the building.

The building now serves as a vehicle wash facility.

Surface soil:
In March 1990, six surface samples were collected from Building 539 and the associated ditch and former holding pond area. All samples were analyzed for metals, VOCs, and total organic halogens.

During the Phase I RFI, thirteen 5-foot soil borings were drilled and sampled at varying intervals, and six surface soil samples were collected. All samples were analyzed for metals and explosives.

During the Phase II RFI, eight surface samples were collected for metals analyses. One background surface soil sample was collected. Forty-one soil borings of varying depths were drilled.

Arsenic (77 ppm) was detected above ATSDR's CV and lead (100,000 ppm) was detected above EPA's action level for lead in soil.

Air Monitoring:
Four air monitoring stations were established and total suspended particulates (TSP) filter samples were collected over a 2- month period. Eight air samples in total were collected. The filter samples were analyzed for target analyte list metals.

Arsenic (0.03 ug/m3) and chromium (0.008 ug/m3) were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

UXO:
Small numbers of ordnance and ordnance debris were identified at this site.

The CMS recommends land use restrictions in addition to fencing and soil cover, or excavation and soil treatment.

TEAD personnel removed or demilitarized all ordnance that was identified at the site.

Soil Pathway:
High levels of lead were detected in surface soil around Building 539. The lead-contaminated area has been fenced off.

Since the lead contaminated area is no longer accessible, the area does not pose a current public health hazard.

Air pathway:
Air monitoring results indicate arsenic and chromium concentrations were well below the most stringent regulatory guidelines established to protect workers from harmful effects.

The furnace does not pose a current or future public health hazard because it is no longer in operation.

Container Storage Area for P999
(SWMU 43)
The Container Storage Area is located in the central portion of TEAD.

These six storage igloos stored chemical munitions components, including rocket parts, fuses, and motor parts between 1985 and 1989.

Each storage igloo measures approximately 60 feet x 26 feet and is constructed from concrete and steel with a soil and grass covering. The igloos are currently used to store conventional ammunition.

An investigation of this area was conducted during the Phase I RI during the early 1980s. No additional investigations were conducted because the area was classified as a "no action" SWMU due to no contaminants of concern identified. According to TEAD officials, no actions are necessary at this site. Environmental regulators approved the "no action" recommendation and the investigation of the site was closed in 1994. The Container Storage Area does not pose a public health hazard because site investigations did not identify any evidence of contamination.
Tank Storage of TCE (SWMU 44) SWMU 44 is located in the maintenance area, within the BRAC Parcel Boundary, in the eastern portion of the Depot.

The above-ground 500-gallon TCE tank was in service from 1971 until 1984. The tank drained into the industrial sewers which ultimately emptied into the Industrial Wastewater Lagoon. Usage was discontinued in 1984.

An investigation of this area was conducted during the Phase I RI during the early 1980s. No additional investigations were conducted because the area was classified as a "no action" SWMU due to no contaminants of concern identified. An Enhanced Preliminary Assessment (EnPA) and Phase I RFI were completed. The TCE degreaser was removed from the building. No future response is planned.

The tank has been removed and no sources of contamination remain.

This site does not pose a public health hazard because the tank has been removed and site investigations did not identify any evidence of release or contamination.
Stormwater Discharge Area
(SWMU 45)

 

This site is located between the Maintenance and Administration Areas.

Stormwater from the Administrative Area discharges via an underground concrete pipe into a small pond approximately one-tenth of an acre in size

The pond, which ranges from 10 to 20 feet across, is located immediately north of the railroad tracks.

During July 1990, surface water and sediment samples were collected from the discharge pond.

During the Phase I RFI, three surface water samples and five sediment samples were collected. These samples were analyzed for VOCs, SVOCs, metals, and explosives. Sediment samples were also analyzed for pesticides.

During the Phase II RFI, two groundwater monitoring wells were installed and two rounds of samples were collected from these wells. Samples were also collected from a previously installed well. Groundwater samples were analyzed for metals, VOCs, SVOCs, and pesticides.

A total of 28 soil samples were analyzed from fourteen 10-foot deep boreholes. The depths of soil samples were from just below the base of the pipeline and from 2 to 4 feet below the pipeline base.

Soil:
Arsenic (13 ppm) was detected above its CV.

Surface Water:
Methylene chloride (10 ppb), and Bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (20 ppb) were detected above their CVs. No other contaminants were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

Groundwater:
No contaminants were detected in groundwater above ATSDR's CVs.

No remedial activities other than natural attenuation and access restrictions already in place are planned for this area. This site does not pose a public health hazard because access is restricted to TEAD personnel and contaminants detected in surface soil and water are not at harmful levels.
Used Oil Dumpsters
(SWMU 46)
SWMU 46 is composed of 21 individual used oil dumpsters located at 18 locations throughout the Administration and Maintenance Areas.

Used oil from vehicle maintenance operations was routinely pumped from the dumpsters for off-site disposal by an oil recycling contractor.

Included in this SWMU was a large diesel spill that occurred near the 500-gallon waste oil tank adjacent to the southeast corner of Building 637.

Soil:
During the Phase I RFI, 18 surface soil samples (top 6 inches of soil) and 18 shallow subsurface samples (1 foot below ground level) were analyzed for TRPH.

During the Phase II investigation additional surface and subsurface samples were collected.

Eleven of the 18 dumpster sites identified were sampled as well as the reported diesel fuel spill. Seven of the sites were not sampled because of the absence of exposed soil in the vicinities.

Very low concentrations of VOCs were detected . Lead (3,000 ppm) was detected above EPAs action level for soil and TRPH (51,200 ppm) were detected.

The Phase I and II RFI were completed. A CMS is recommended for dumpsters at buildings 502, 602, and 611. The dumpsters at building 637 have been included in the underground storage tank (UST) investigation, so no CMS is necessary. For the remaining dumpsters, no further action is needed. These sites do not pose a public health hazard under the current industrial land use conditions
Boiler Blowdown Water
(SWMU 47)
This SWMU consists of four locations in the Maintenance Area and includes buildings 600, 610, 637, and, 691. Each building contains a boiler that generates steam.

During boiler plant maintenance at buildings throughout the site, boilers are back-flushed during a blowdown. Tannic acid is used during this process. Effluent from most buildings leads to the IWTP. From one building, the discharges flow into a culvert, then to an unlined ditch where they may infiltrate surface soil.

The Phase I investigation included surface water and sediment sampling.

During the Phase II study, a total of 6 soil samples, 7 sediment samples, and 2 surface water samples were collected.

Soil:
Arsenic (10.6 ppm)was detected above ATSDR's CVs.

Sediment:
Lead (580 ppm) and arsenic (10.9 ppm) were detected in sediment above ATSDR's CVs, and TRPH (806 ppm) was also detected in sediment.

The Phase I and II RI are complete. No further action is recommended. This site does not pose a public health hazard because most contaminants were not detected at levels that are harmful under the current land use conditions and access to the area is restricted.
Old Dispensary Discharge (Building 400)
(SWMU 48)
This area is located in the Administration Area where the TEAD dispensary building formerly stood. The building was torn down in the mid-1980s.

X-ray developing chemicals may have been discharged at this site. The site is currently a flat, grass covered area and an asphalt parking lot.

No investigations of SWMU 48 were conducted prior to Phase II RFI sampling in 1994.

During Phase II RFI sampling, two 10-foot soil borings were drilled, one at each outfall location. A total of four soil samples of varying depths (depths ranged from 0 - 10 feet bgs) were analyzed for metals, VOCs, SVOCs, pesticides, and PCBs.

Dieldrin (0.13 ppm) was detected in one soil boring sample above its CV. No other contaminants were identified above their CVs.

The CMS recommends land use restrictions. This site does not pose a public health hazard because most contaminants were not detected above ATSDR's CVs and the area is restricted to TEAD personnel.
Stormwater/Industrial Wastewater Piping
(SWMU 49)
This 1,179-acre area is in the northeast portion of TEAD. SWMU 49 is located within the BRAC parcel. This site is the current storm water sewer system. It includes the old connections to the new industrial wastewater system.

Building 609, a former steam cleaning/radiator repair facility located in the southeast section of the Maintenance Area, has produced a large amount of wastewater during previous operations and was included in the investigation of SWMU 49.

It is estimated that as much as 120,000 gallons of potentially contaminated water flowed through this system daily. Wastewater may have been released through damaged portions of the pipes.

During the Phase I field investigation, a total of 64 soil borings were completed in areas with potential contamination. In addition, surface soil (0 - <1 foot below the surface), sediment, and surface water samples were collected.

Additional soil, sediment, and surface water samples were collected during the Phase II field investigation.

Most of the samples collected were analyzed for metals, VOCs, and SVOCs.

Surface soil:
Low concentrations of metals and organics have been detected around Building 609. Arsenic (15 ppm) and lead (690 ppm) were detected above their respective CVs.

Old lines have been plugged so that effluent is delivered directly to the IWTP. An EnPA and RFI were completed. According to information presented in the investigation report, the CMS will likely focus on institutional controls. This site does not pose a public health hazard because the surface soil is generally below ATSDR's CVs or EPA's soil screening values. The land use is either industrial or manufacturing and it is expected to remain this way.
Compressor Condensate Drain, Building 619 and 613
(SWMU 50)
This SWMU is in the central portion of the Maintenance Area. Large air compressors associated with the vehicle maintenance operations at TEAD were located in Buildings 619 and 613.

Compressor condensate was pumped to a partially buried 55-gallon drum with a perforated bottom to dissipate the effluent. In October 1993, the drum was buried in a gravel sump. The compressor effluent may contain lubricating oil. The effluent flowed from the compressor through the gravel-filled drum into underlying soil.

Reports indicate the gravel sump is oil stained, however, there was no indication as to whether the staining occurred prior to or during the use of the drum.

During Phase I and II field investigations, soil samples from varying depths were collected. Samples were analyzed for metals, VOCs, and SVOCs.

Surface soil:
Arsenic (4.7 ppm) was detected above ATSDR's CVs.

EnPA and RFI were completed. The CMS should focus on institutional controls. This site does not pose a public health hazard under its current land use because soil contaminants were not detected at harmful levels.

SWMU 50 is within the BRAC parcel. However, the land use is not expected to change. If the Tooele Redevelopment Authority proposes that the area be considered for other uses (e.g., recreational, commercial, or residential), environmental sampling results will need to be re-evaluated to ensure that the area is safe for the proposed land use.

Chromic Acid/Alodine Drying Beds
(SWMU 51)
This site consists of four bermed concrete slabs located southeast of the Maintenance Area.

The concrete slabs were used as drying beds for chromic acid and alodine wastes generated in the Maintenance and Supply Areas in the 1970s. Beds were also used to flush radiators and engines. There are no known releases at this site.

SWMU has been abandoned and is no longer used for any activities at the Depot.

Soil sampling was conducted during the Phase I and Phase II field investigations. Eight soil borings were drilled during the Phase I investigation and five additional soil borings were drilled during the Phase II investigation. Samples were analyzed for VOCs, SVOCs, metals, and cyanide.

Results of sampling showed that surface and subsurface soil are contaminated with metals (e.g., chromium)and SVOCs.

Arsenic (38 ppm) and lead (1,100 ppm) were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

EnPA and RFI were completed. The CMS should focus on institutional controls. This site does not pose a public health hazard under its current land use because access to the area is restricted and most samples did not contain contaminants at levels that would be harmful.

SWMU 51 is within the BRAC parcel. However, the land use is expected to remain industrial. If the Tooele Redevelopment Authority proposes that the area be considered for other uses (e.g., recreational, commercial, or residential), environmental sampling results will need to be re-evaluated to ensure that the area is safe for the proposed land use.

Possible Drain Field
(SWMU 52A)
This site is located in the Administrative Area, in a large open field northwest of the skeet range, and may have been used as a sewage drain field. Samples were collected during Phase I and Phase II field investigations. Test pits were excavated during the Phase I investigation and surface soil samples were collected during the Phase II investigation. Samples were analyzed for metals, VOCs, SVOCs, and some pesticides.

No contaminants were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

EnPA and RFI were completed. No further action is necessary.

Five test pits ranging from 7 to 10 feet below ground surface were excavated at locations associated with the visible trench system.

This site does not pose a public health hazard because contaminants were not detected at levels of health concern.
Disposal Trenches
(SWMU 52B)
This site is located in the Administrative Area, and may have been used as a waste disposal area for construction debris in the 1960s. Refer to SWMU 52A for the extent of sampling.

No contaminants were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

EnPA and RFI were completed. The CMS should focus on institutional controls.

Five test pits ranging from between 5 and 10 feet below ground surface beneath the mounds were excavated at the disposal trenches.

This site does not pose a public health hazard because contaminants were not detected at levels of health concern.
Area Containing Charcoal Material
(SWMU 52C)
This site is located in the Administrative Area, between the skeet range and the installation boundary.

Charcoal material was found on the ground's surface between the skeet range and installation boundary.

Field observation of the area suggests the material is scattered thinly over the surface in a non-uniform manner throughout the 19-acre area.

Twenty-five surface soil samples were collected along a grid within the 19-acre area.

Investigations showed that the materials contained low levels of VOCs and SVOCs. The contamination was limited to the charcoal material and the soil directly below small piles of the material.

Area containing charcoal material:
Benzene (20 ppm) was detected above ATSDR's CVs.

EnPA and RFI were completed. Active remediation is called for, since site will be used as a park or for residences. The removal action was completed during the fall of 2002. This site does not pose a past or present public health hazard.
Horse Stable Area
(SWMU 52D)
This site is located in the Administrative Area. There are drainage routes from pasture and stables. Wastewater was reportedly discharged from the former residential complex and flowed into two unlined ditches included in the wastewater spreading area (SWMU 35). Surface Soil:
During the Phase II and Supplemental sampling efforts, 22 soil samples were collected from 0 to 3 feet below ground surface.

Chlordane (36.5 ppm) was detected above ATSDR's CVs.

EnPA and RFI were completed. The CMS should focus on institutional controls. This site does not pose a past or present public health hazard.

ATSDR reviewed the toxicological literature for chlordane and there were no studies identified where health effects were observed at the estimated exposure dose using the maximum detected concentration of 37 ppm.

PCB Storage/Spill Site
(SWMU 53)
This site consists of two buildings (659 and 679), one of which was used to store PCB-containing transformers, the other was the site of a PCB spill. During the Phase I field investigation, six shallow surface soil samples (0-6 inches bgs) were collected at the loading/unloading area of Building 659. In addition, 10-foot soil borings were drilled in the area of the PCB spill at Building 679. Three soil samples were collected from each boring. All samples were analyzed for PCBs.

No PCBs were detected at the spill site (Building 679). One PCB was detected (0.32 ppm) at concentrations below regulatory guidelines in the storage building (Building 659).

EnPA and RFI were completed. No further action is necessary. This site does not pose a public health hazard because PCBs were not detected at the original site spill and the building does not contain PCBs at levels that are harmful.
Sand Blast Area
(SWMU 54)
The area consists of three buildings (Buildings 604, 611, and 637) located within the Maintenance Area at TEAD, which is within the BRAC parcel. The buildings were used for sand blasting.

Past vehicle component rebuilding and maintenance activities, including sandblasting, painting, and stripping operations were conducted at these three buildings.

One of the buildings (Building 637) has a spent media hopper located outside the building that accumulates used sandblasting materials.

Contaminants may have been released to the soil from the spent media hoppers.

Soil:
During the Phase I field investigation, surface and subsurface soil samples were collected from soil borings drilled at each of the three buildings. Surface samples were also collected from the dust collection units at each building. Samples were analyzed for VOCs, SVOCs, and metals.

During the Phase II field investigation, additional soil borings were drilled and surface and subsurface soil samples were collected and analyzed for metals and SVOCs.

High levels of lead (110,000 ppm) were detected at one building (Building 611). Lead was also detected at Building 637 (640 ppm) at levels that exceed EPA's action level for lead in soil.

EnPA and RFI were completed. The CMS will focus on active remediation for the building with lead contamination, and institutional controls for the other two buildings. There is no public health hazard associated with this site. The contaminated soil near Building 611 will be removed. While lead concentrations near the other buildings is above residential screening values, they are within levels appropriate for industrial buildings. Institutional controls will prevent unauthorized access.
Battery Shop, Building 618
(SWMU 55)
The site is located in the Maintenance Area. Building 618 was recently used as a cafeteria prior to BRAC closure. Prior to this, Building 618 was used as a battery shop and possible vehicle maintenance or metal plating operations.

A drainage pipe exits the building and flows into a 3- by 3 foot sump. It is possible that effluent releases from the pipe may have resulted in contamination. All operational activities in Building 618 were stopped in May 1995.

Soil:
During the Phase I field investigation, two 10-foot soil borings were drilled through the concrete surrounding the sump. Soil samples were collected from each boring at the surface and at depths of 5 and 10 feet bgs. An additional surface soil sample was collected from the exposed soil within the sump. All samples were analyzed for metals, VOCs, and SVOCs.

Additional soil sampling was conducted during the Phase II field investigation.

No contaminants were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

EnPA and RFI were completed. Most contaminated soil was removed during the test pit excavation conducted during the Phase II field effort. No further action is necessary. This site does not pose a public health hazard because contaminant levels were not found at harmful levels.
Gravel Pit
(SWMU 56)
This site is located along the northeast perimeter of the depot and consists of a low-lying area surrounded on three sides by a ridge or berm. The gravel pit contains burned and un-burned materials. Soil:
During the Phase I investigation, five test pits were excavated at locations within SWMU 56, with emphasis on the burned areas. Soil samples were collected from the test pits and analyzed for metals, VOCs, SVOCs, pesticides, and explosives.

During the Phase II investigation, a surface soil sampling grid was constructed. Seventeen random surface soil samples were collected from the gridded area and an additional three surface soil samples were collected from outside the gravel pit.

Burned area: Lead (1,600 ppm) was detected above EPA's action level for lead in soil.

EnPA and RFI were completed. The CMS for the burned area should focus on active remediation, while non-burned areas should have institutional controls to limit future residential land use. This site does not pose a public health hazard.

The lead-contaminated surface soil from the burned area has been remediated. Future land use will remain either industrial or manufacturing.

Skeet Range
(SWMU 57)
The Skeet Range is located near the main entrance to TEAD in the northern portion of the Administration Area. The area impacted by the Skeet Range covers approximately 10 acres.

Records at TEAD indicate that regulations have prohibited the use of lead shot since the initiation of skeet and trap shooting activities in 1978. However, the regulation has not been strictly enforced.

In addition to lead shot, a large quantity of broken clay targets have accumulated in the impact area. Polycyclic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are used in the production of these targets and may have been released into the soil.

Site assessment of the Skeet Range was conducted during the Phase II investigation. Surface (< 6 inches below ground surface) and subsurface (1 - 1.5 feet below ground surface) were collected at this site.

Surface soil: Antimony (3,040 ppm), arsenic (1,700 ppm), and lead (160,000 ppm) were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

In addition, the following SVOCs were detected; benzo(a)anthracene (100 ppm), benzo(a)pyrene (200 ppm), benzo(b)fluoranthene (200 ppm), benzo(g,h,i)- perylene (70 ppm), chrysene (100 ppm), dibenzo- (a,h)anthracene (100 ppm), indeno (1,2,3-cd)pyrene (70 ppm), and phenanthrene (40 ppm).

EnPA and RFI were completed. The CMS should focus on active remediation.

The lead-contaminated soil was remediated in Fall 2000.

The Skeet Range does not pose a past or current public health hazard because access was restricted and possible contact with contaminated soil was very limited.

Utah DEQ will be reviewing the Army's soil removal and confirmation sampling for this site.

Extraction Well 15E
(Area of Concern [AOC] 3)
The area was possibly used for water disposal. No contaminants were detected in groundwater above ATSDR's CVs during the Phase II RFI. The Phase I and II RFI were completed. No further action is necessary. This site does not pose a public health hazard because contaminants were not detected at harmful levels.
Unknown site near ammunition storage area
(AOC 4)
This site is a small fenced area. Surface soil:
Two organic compounds were detected during the Phase II RFI, but were well below screening values.
The Phase I and II RFI were completed. No further action is necessary. This site does not pose a public health hazard because contaminants were not detected at harmful levels.
Other Areas Requiring Environmental Evaluation (AREE):  
AREE 10: Asbestos Asbestos-Containing Materials (ACM) are in buildings and other structures. No friable ACM were noted in EnPA. EnPA has been completed, an Asbestos Management Plan is to be implemented. This site does not pose a public health hazard because friable asbestos was not identified where people would be potentially exposed.
AREE 11: PCB-Containing Transformers PCB-containing transformers exist throughout the BRAC parcel. No known or suspected releases have occurred. EnPA has been completed. The annual PCB transformer inspection program will continue. This site does not pose a public health hazard because contaminant levels were not found at harmful levels in areas of known releases.
AREE 12: USTs There were 17 regulated USTs and in excess of 100 unregulated USTs on the BRAC parcel. ATSDR has not reviewed any soil data collected during regulated UST removal. All regulated USTs have been removed and contaminated areas have been remediated. The regulated USTs do not pose a public health hazard. These USTs have been removed and any contaminated areas have been cleaned up.

The status of the unregulated USTs is unknown. Any groundwater contamination from these USTs would be detected by the network of monitoring wells on site.

AREE 13: Aboveground Storage Tanks (ASTs) Over 100 above ground storage tanks (ASTs) are on the BRAC parcel; some may be deteriorating. There are no known releases from ASTs. Releases from overfill or leakage could have occurred. A Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasures Plan (SPCC) is in place. An AST Management Plan is being prepared. This site does not pose a public health hazard because available information does not identify any releases.
AREE 19: Lead-Based Paint Buildings constructed prior to 1972 may contain lead-based paint. Children under 6 years of age have not been housed in any of the buildings. Buildings scheduled to be used by children under 6 in the Reuse Plan will be inspected and lead-based paint will be abated. Residential units located within AREE 19 do not pose a public health hazard. Although some of the units may contain lead paint, occupants are notified of the potential lead hazard and are provided information about how to protect children from potential lead exposure.

Notes:

1. Listed contaminants exceed Agency for Toxic Substances and Diseases Registry (ATSDR) or EPA health guidelines unless noted otherwise. Underlined contaminants had no ATSDR comparison value.

2. Unless otherwise noted, surface soil samples are taken from between 0 and 2 feet below ground surface

Sources:

Dames & Moore. 1998. Feasibility Study Report: Operable Units 4, 8, and 9, Tooele Army Depot. January 1998.

Dames & Moore. 1998. Revised Draft Risk Assessment for the Industrial Waste Lagoon, SMWU 2, TEAD. March 1998.

Dames & Moore. 1998. Corrective Measures Study Work Plan, Group A Suspected Releases SWMUs, Tooele Army Depot. March 1998.

Earth Tech. 1995. Base Realignment and Closure Cleanup Plan, Tooele Army Depot - North Area. Prepared for U.S. Army Environmental Center. June 1995.

E.C. Jordan Co. 1990. Site Investigation and Follow-On Remedial Investigation, Final Site Investigation Work Plan, December 1990.

Kleinfelder. 1998. Northeastern Boundary Area Groundwater Investigation Report of Findings Volume I, TEAD. March 1998.

Montgomery Watson. 1993. Revised Final Phase I RCRA Facility Investigation Report Tooele Army Depot-North Area Suspected Releases SWMUs, Volume I. December 1993.

Montgomery Watson. 1997. Final (2nd Revision) Phase II RCRA Facility Investigation Report Tooele Army Depot-North Area Group A Suspected Releases SWMUs, Volume I. August 1997.

Rust Environment and Infrastructure. 1996. Revised Final RCRA Facility Investigation Report Phase II Study Known-Releases SWMUs. Prepared for U.S.

Army Environmental Center. April 1996.

Rust Environment and Infrastructure. 1997. Revised Final Remedial Investigation Addendum Report for Operable Units 4,8, and 9. Volume I. February 1997.

Science Application International Corporation. 1997. Revised Final Tooele Army Depot Group B Suspected Releases SWMUs Phase II RCRA Facility Investigation Report, Volume I: Technical report. Prepared for U.S. Army Environmental Center. December 1997.

Science Application International Corporation. 1998. Revised Final Tooele Army Depot Base Realignment and Closure Parcel Group C SWMUs RCRA Facility Investigation Report, Volume I: Technical Report. Prepared for U.S. Army Environmental Center. April 1998.

Science Application International Corporation. 1997. Tooele Army Depot Group B Suspected Releases SWMUs Phase II RCRA Facility Investigation Report. Prepared for U.S. Army Environmental Center. June 1997.

Tetra Tech. 1996. Environmental Baseline Survey, Tooele Army Depot, BRAC 93 Excess Property Parcel. Vol. 1. Prepared for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. January 1996.

U.S. EPA, Utah Department of Water Quality, and U.S. Army. 1991. Federal Facility Agreement Under CERCLA Section 120.


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