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PUBLIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT

NAVAL AIR STATION FALLON
(a/k/a FALLON NAVAL AIR STATION)
FALLON, CHURCHILL COUNTY, NEVADA


TABLES

Table 1.

Evaluation of Potential Public Health Hazards Associated with the 21 IRP Sites at NASF
Sites Site Description/Waste Disposal History Investigation Results/ Environmental Monitoring Results Corrective Activities ATSDR's Evaluation of Public Health Hazards
Crash Crew Training Area (Site 1) The Crash Crew Training Area is in the southern part of Naval Air Station Fallon (NASF). The area consisted of an unlined, earth-bermed pit and two aboveground storage tanks (ASTs). The pit is roughly 25 feet in diameter and 3 feet deep. The storage tanks, located about 180 feet west of the pit, were removed in 1994 along with the underground piping that feeds into the pit. The two storage tanks had a capacity of approximately 1,000 and 5,000 gallons respectively.

The pit was used to conduct firefighter training activities for NASF personnel beginning in the mid-1950s and ending in April 1988. Altogether, an estimated 1.1 million gallons of flammable liquids were burned in the pit.

Soil: Four surface soil samples were collected during the remedial investigation (RI). Samples were analyzed for low boiling point petroleum hydrocarbons (LBPHCs), high boiling point petroleum hydrocarbons (HBPHCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), pesticides, semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and metals.

In April 1999, 66 additional soil samples were collected and analyzed for VOCs and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) as part of the intrinsic remediation assessment.

Arsenic (8 parts per million [ppm]) was the only contaminant that exceeded ATSDR's CV. HBPHCs were detected at a maximum concentration of 2,100 ppm and LBPHCs were detected at a maximum concentration of 2,200 ppm.

The RI recommended removal actions for the soil in the former burn pit area and the recovery of free-product in the groundwater.

Upon removal of free product from the groundwater, the RI recommended an assessment of residual product in the soil at and above the capillary fringe.

In the summer of 1999, a significant portion of the contaminated soils in the former burn pit and the former AST area were excavated.

This site does not pose a public health hazard because most of the contaminants in soil were not detected at levels of health concern and the area is monitored by NASF security and only authorized personnel are permitted in the area.

Although short term exposure would not likely cause harm, as a precautionary measure, ATSDR recommended placing a fence around the "biopile" in the unlikely event that children from the family housing area are able to briefly access the area.

In July 2002, the Navy installed a fence and has arranged to remove, treat, and dispose contaminated

The flammable liquids burned in the pit were waste products, including off-specification fuel (90 percent of the wastes burned), napalm, oil (9 percent of the wastes burned), and solvents (1 percent) of the wastes burned. These materials were obtained from the old (site 16) and new (site 2) fuel farms, the aircraft maintenance shop (not a site of concern), and the vehicle maintenance shop (not a site of concern).

Napalm, off-specification fuel, oil, and solvents (e.g., carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene [TCE], and methyl ethyl ketone) were burned from the mid-1950s to 1982, but only off-specification JP-5 jet fuel from the new fuel farm was burned from 1982 to April 1988.

Groundwater: Twenty-five groundwater samples were collected during the RI and analyzed for LBPHCs, HBPHCs, PCBs, SVOCs, VOCs, and metals. Additional data have also been collected as routine monitoring of the groundwater continues at this site.

VOCs and SVOCs:Benzene (800 parts per billion [ppb], toluene (490 ppb), di(2-ethyl hexyl)- phthalate (9 ppb), 4-methylphenol (910 ppb), 1,1-dichloro- ethene (28 ppb), 4-methyl -2-pentanone (2,200 ppb), methylene chloride (37 ppb), vinyl chloride (3 ppb), cis-1,2-dichloro- ethene (2,500 ppb), tetrachloro- ethylene (PCE) (680 ppb), and TCE (840 ppb) were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

Metals:Arsenic (892 ppb), boron (60,400 ppb), manganese (1,980 ppb), molybdenum (1,730 ppb), and vanadium (351 ppb) were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

NASF has been involved with an experimental method of remediation for soils contaminated with TPHs and VOCs at Site 1. In July 1999, contaminated soil from the fire training pit was collected and placed in a designated area, referred to as the biopile, within Site 1.

In July 2002, a fence was installed around the biopile and NASF has approved a plan to remove, treat, and dispose contaminated soil from the biopile at an off site regulated disposal facility.

Groundwater is not used for drinking or any other purpose and monitoring wells near the site boundary have not detected site-related contaminants.
New Fuel Farm (Site 2) The New Fuel Farm is in the northwestern part of NASF. It is used to store an estimated 3.3 million gallons of jet fuel (JP-8), 8,000 gallons of diesel fuel, and 12,000 gallons of motor vehicle gasoline fuel. The site has served as the main fuel storage and distribution terminal for NASF since 1957. The JP-8 fuel is received from an underground pipeline originating in Sparks, Nevada, and is currently stored in three three ASTs. Aircraft are fueled and de-fueled at the site, and various fuels that are stored here are tested periodically. It is estimated that 2,500 gallons of fuels have spilled in the vehicle parking area at this site.

Site 2 also includes a tank bottom disposal area, an oil/water separator leach field, and a weed control area. Up to 60,000 gallons of tank bottom liquids were disposed at the site between 1957 and 1981. The tank bottom disposal area may have received an additional 5,000 gallons of JP-4 or JP-5 jet fuel from a leaking fuel tank during the early

Soil: Two surface soil samples were collected during the 1988 Phase 1 Preliminary Assessment/Site Investigation (PA/SI) of the Installation Restoration (IR) Program and analyzed for TPHs. Two additional surface soil samples were collected during the Nevada Department of Environmental Protection's (DEP's) investigation of a spill and analyzed for TPHs. During the RI, four surface soil samples were collected and analyzed for LBPHCs, HBPHCs, SVOCs, VOCs, PCBs, pesticides, and metals.

Arsenic (40 ppm) exceeded ATSDR's CV. TPHs were detected at a maximum concentration of 7,690 ppm.

Two underground gas storage tanks (USTs) with a total capacity of 100,000 gallons were removed in June 1992. A third UST was also recently removed. Following tank removal, a product-recovery sump was constructed in the excavation pit and a monitoring and recovery well was installed.

A new 1.26 million gallon AST along with the other two existing ASTs currently store approximately 3.2 million gallons of fuel.

This site does not pose a public health hazard because most contaminants in soil were not detected at levels of health concern and the area is only accessible to authorized personnel.

Groundwater is not used for drinking or any other purpose and monitoring wells near the western boundary have not detected site-related contaminants other than low levels of TPHs. These monitoring wells are more than 1,000 feet from the NASF boundary. It is unlikely that TPH contamination has migrated off site since groundwater flows in the opposite direction.

The oil/water separator, installed in 1981, collects surface runoff and spills from the tank and loading rack area. In 1985, about 2,000 gallons of JP-5 fuel spilled in this area and, between 1957 and 1981, as much as 18,000 gallons of fuel were spilled from daily draining of fuel trucks. About 500 gallons of waste fuel were applied to unpaved ground in the weed control area between 1957 and 1981. Groundwater: Samples from eight monitoring wells were collected during a 1988 site investigation and analyzed for TPHs and VOCs. During the RI, 48 groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for LBPHCs, HBPHCs, SVOCs, VOCs, and metals.

VOCs: Benzene (290 ppb), bromoform (21 ppb), and dichlorobromomethane (4 ppb) exceeded ATSDR's CVs.

Metals: Arsenic (69 ppb), antimony (38 ppb), boron (91,700 ppb), manganese (2,050 ppb), molybdenum (1,310 ppb), and vanadium (1,230 ppb) exceeded ATSDR's CVs.

Total petroleum hydrocarbons:
TPHs were detected at a maximum concentration of 24,000 ppm.

The RI recommended removal of four areas of free petroleum product from the groundwater at Site 2.  
Hangar 300 Area (Site 3) Site 3 is in the west-central part of NASF and consists of the north and south disposal areas, bowser (a military vehicle) disposal area, oil/water separator area, ground-support equipment area, and the wells air start building area. A drainage ditch runs northeast through Site 3 and connects with a series of ditches that intersect the lower diagonal (LD) drain on the eastern boundary of NASF.

The bowser area is located north of the apron (the paved strip near the hangar) and east of the drainage ditch and oil/water separator area. Between 1960 and 1984, approximately 12,500 gallons of waste aircraft fluid--including JP-5 jet fuel, hydraulic fluids, lube oil, carbon tetrachloride, TCE, and PD-680 (a stoddard solvent)--was disposed of in this area.

The north and south disposal areas are unpaved surfaces. Between 1960 and 1981, waste aircraft fluid was occasionally dumped on the ground

Soil: Three surface soil samples were collected during the Phase 1 PA/SI of the IR Program and analyzed for VOCs and TPH. During the RI, eight surface soil samples were collected and analyzed for HBPHCs, LBPHCs, SVOCs, and VOCs.

Arsenic (26 ppm) exceeded ATSDR's CV.

TPH was detected at a maximum concentration of 15,000 ppm.

No corrective actions were recommended for this site. This site does not pose a public health hazard because most of the contaminants in soil were not detected at levels of health concern and the area is only accessible to authorized personnel.

Groundwater is contaminated with VOCs, metals, and petroleum hydrocarbons. However, no one drinks the groundwater underneath the station and groundwater flow is towards the southeast, away from station and municipal drinking water sources. Since the groundwater plume at Site 3 is near the central portion of NASF, it is contained on site.

Between 1960 and 1986, the oil/water separator area received about 3,000 gallons of aircraft maintenance wastes and cleaning solvents that originated from the Hangar 300 floor drain. These wastes occasionally bypassed the oil/water separator due to equipment malfunctions and, as a result, flowed directly into the drainage ditch.

The ground-support equipment area is partially unpaved and is located west of building 374. Between 1960 and 1987, this area received approximately 1,350 gallons of waste fluids from spills and leaks that occurred at an adjacent storage area. These wastes were similar to those disposed at the north and south disposal areas.

The wells air start building area is located between building 374 and building 432. Between 1978 and 1987, this area received compressor blowdown, which contained lube oil. This material probably ponded or drained slightly to the west.

Groundwater: Twelve groundwater samples were collected during the RI and analyzed for HBPHCs, LBPHCs, PCBs, pesticides, SVOCs, and VOCs.

VOCs: TCE (160 ppb), benzene (2 ppb), and 1,1-dichloroethene (2 ppb) were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

Metals: Arsenic (4,430 ppb), boron (126,000 ppb), molybdenum (3,440 ppb), antimony (47 ppb), and vanadium (581 ppb) were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

TPH-E and TPH--Purgeable (TPH-P) were detected at a maximum concentration of 1,000 ppb and 250 ppb, respectively.

   
Transportation Yard (Site 4) The Transportation Yard, located directly south of Site 2, consists of Building 371 and Building 378, which was used for vehicle maintenance, storage, and painting.

From 1976 to 1981, Building 378 was used for painting and light overhaul operations. An estimated 50 gallons of wastes, including radiator coolants, vehicle fluids, and paint wastes, were flushed into subsoils beneath the building, and an additional 400 gallons of waste fluids were spilled in the adjacent yard during vehicle repair.

Soil: During the RI, three surface soil samples were collected and analyzed for LBPHCs, HBPHCs, SVOCs, VOCs, and metals. No SVOCs or VOCs exceeded ATSDR's CVs.

Groundwater: During the RI, 48 groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for LBPHCs, HBPHCs, SVOCs, VOCs, and metals.

VOCs: Bromoform (21 ppb) and dichlorobromomethane (4 ppb) exceeded ATSDR's CVs.

Metals: Antimony (38 ppb), boron (91,700 ppb), manganese (2,050 ppb), molybdenum (1,310 ppb), and vanadium (1,230 ppb) exceeded ATSDR's CVs.

No corrective actions were recommended for this site. This site does not pose a public health hazard because contaminants in soil were not detected at levels of health concern and the area is only accessible to authorized personnel.
Defuel Disposal Area (Site 6) The site currently consists of two regions of relatively level, unpaved surface soils where once two unlined pits existed. Each disposal pit is estimated to have been 500 feet by 500 feet in size. One of these disposal areas is within Site 21, the Receiver Site Landfill. Site 6 is in the northeastern part of NASF.

Between 1966 and 1972, a total of 70,000 gallons of off-specification JP-4 and JP-5 jet fuel were removed from aircraft fuel tanks and disposed on the ground surface in the Defuel Disposal Area.

Soil: Subsurface soil samples were collected and analyzed for petroleum hydrocarbons during the RI. Twenty-three soil samples were collected in April 1999 to further characterize contamination in the suspected source area, which is the Southern Disposal Area. All the samples were analyzed for TPH-D (Diesel) and two of the samples were analyzed for VOCs. No surface soil samples were collected during any of the investigations.

Low concentrations of VOCs were detected in the two soil samples. TPH-D was detected in soil at 14, 089 ppm.

Groundwater: During the RI, 20 groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for LBPHCs, HBPHCs, PCBs, pesticides, SVOCs, VOCs, and metals.

VOCs and SVOCs:
Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (4 ppb), tetrachloroethene (17 ppb), and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene (31 ppb) exceeded

The RI recommended a removal action to recover free-product in the groundwater at Site 6.

The RI recommended no further action for soil because the area with contaminated soil was small and access was restricted.

This site does not pose a public health hazard because the area does not contain harmful levels of contaminants in soil and is only accessible to authorized personnel.

Groundwater underneath NASF is not used for drinking or any other purpose. The Site 6 groundwater plume is close to the northeastern boundary of the station and groundwater flow could allow contaminants to migrate off site. A sample from one monitoring well near the station boundary contains very low concentrations of fuel-related contaminants (TPH). However, there are no of-site drinking water wells in close proximity to the

  Metals: Arsenic (7,300 ppb), antimony (38 ppb), boron (240,000 ppb), cadmium (6 ppb), mercury (2 ppb), molybdenum (2,200 ppb), vanadium (2,600 ppb), and lead (110 ppb) exceeded ATSDR's CVs.

TPH-E was detected at a maximum concentration of 41,000 ppb. TPH-P was detected at a maximum concentration of 86 ppb.

   
Napalm Burn Pit (Site 7) Site 7 is purportedly in the northeastern part of NASF within Site 21, west of Site 6. From the early 1960s to 1983, up to 240,000 gallons of excess napalm were burned at Site 7 using diesel fuel; however, the PA/SI team could not locate the site and the NAS Fallon Fire Chief testified in 1991 that napalm was not burned here and was instead burned at Site 1. Soil: No surface soil samples were collected during the RI.

Groundwater: During the RI, 20 groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for LBPHCs, HBPHCs, PCBs, pesticides, SVOCs, VOCs, and metals.

VOCs and SVOCs:
Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (4 ppb) and tetrachloroethene (17 ppb) were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

Metals: Antimony (38 ppb), cadmium (6 ppb), and mercury (2 ppb) met or exceeded ATSDR's CVs.

No corrective actions were recommended for this site. This site does not pose a public health hazard because the area does not contain harmful levels of contaminants in soil and is only accessible to authorized personnel. Groundwater is not used for drinking or any other purpose and is not a health concern.
Wastewater Treatment Plant (Site 9) The Wastewater Treatment Plant, in the southwestern part of NASF, is the primary treatment facility and since 1943, has received sewer wastes from all base operations. The plant consists of treatment basins, settling ponds, and sludge and grit disposal areas. As a result of sludge and grit disposal, a leaking underground diesel tank and insufficiently treated water, diesel fuel, metals, oils, paint wastes, photographic chemicals, and tank sludge may have contaminated the site. Soil: Seven surface soil samples were collected during the RI and analyzed for LBPHCs, HBPHCs, SVOCs, VOCs, pesticides, PCBs, and metals.

Arsenic (14 ppm) exceeded ATSDR's CV.

TPHs were detected at a maximum concentration of 296 ppb.

Groundwater: Two groundwater samples were collected during the RI and analyzed for LBPHCs, HBPHCs, PCBs, pesticides, SVOCs, VOCs, and metals.

Arsenic (1,650 ppb), boron (66,900 ppb), molybdenum (2,070 ppb), and vanadium (800 ppb) exceeded ATSDR's CVs.

A 500-gallon underground diesel tank, located north of Building 130, was removed in 1985. This site does not pose a public health hazard because the area does not contain harmful levels of contaminants in soil and is only accessible to authorized personnel. Groundwater is not used for drinking or any other purpose and is, therefore not a health concern.
Ground to Air Transmitting and Receiving (GATAR) Compound (Site 10) The GATAR Compound consists of a graveled and fenced area in the southern part of NASF. It has been used for interim storage of hazardous wastes since 1986. Wastes temporarily stored at the site in aboveground containers (primarily 55-gallon drums) include oil filters, aircraft debris, waste oil containing PCBs, paints, solvents, waste oils, and hydraulic fluids.

Several 1-gallon containers of waste oil containing PCBs were reported buried at the site in 1984, but the exact burial location is unknown.

Soil: Five surface soil samples were collected during the RI and analyzed for HBPHCs, LBPHCs, PCBs, pesticides, SVOCs, VOCs, and metals.

Arsenic (36 ppm) was the only contaminant that exceeded ATSDR's CVs.

Groundwater: No groundwater samples were collected at Site 10 during the RI.

No corrective actions were recommended for this site. This site does not pose a public health hazard because the area does not contain harmful levels of contaminants.
Paint Shop (Site 11) The Paint Shop, in the southern part of NASF, received paint wastes from the early 1960s to 1986. Waste paints and thinners were either disposed of or spilled on unpaved ground north of the shop. Soil: Only two subsurface soil samples were collected during the RI and they showed very low concentrations of VOCs. No surface soil samples were collected at Site 11 during the RI.

Groundwater: Eight groundwater samples were collected during the RI and analyzed for LBPHCs, HBPHCs, SVOCs, and VOCs.

VOCs: Benzene (330 ppb), di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (8 ppb), pentachlorophenol (11 ppb), chloroform (3 ppb), and TCE (12 ppb) were detected at or above ATSDR's CVs.

LBPHCs (gasoline) were detected at a maximum concentration of 680 ppb. HBPHCs (diesel) were detected at a maximum concentration of 310 ppb.

No corrective actions were recommended for this site. This site does not pose a public health hazard. Access to this site is restricted and groundwater is not used for drinking or any other purpose.
Pest Control Shop (Site 12) The Pest Control Shop, in the southern part of NASF, has handled pesticides from the early 1960s to the present. DDT was handled at the site prior to 1974. After 1974, malathion, pyrethrin, diazinon, parathion, and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid were handled and stored at the site. A leachfield south of the site once received runoff from the rinsing of pest control vehicles, but today is no longer operational. A northern leachfield received rinsewater from the mixing and rinsing of empty containers. Soil: Seven soil borings were drilled at Site 12. Low levels of pesticides were detected, but they did not exceed ATSDR's CVs.

Groundwater: Three groundwater samples were collected during the RI and analyzed for HBPHCs, LBPHCs, PCBs, pesticides, SVOCs, VOCs, and metals.

VOCs and SVOCs: Benzene (47 ppb)and di (2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (4 ppb) were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

Pesticides:Alpha-BHC (0.16 ppb), gamma-BHC (0.14 ppb), and 2,4-dichlorophenol (220 ppb) were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

Metals: Arsenic (561 ppb), boron (66,100 ppb), molybdenum (2,850 ppb), and vanadium (209 ppb) were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

HBPHCs (diesel) were detected at a maximum concentration of 5,000 ppb. LBPHCs (gasoline) were detected at a maximum concentration of 170 ppb.

No corrective actions were recommended for this site. This site does not pose a public health hazard because soil does not contain contaminants at harmful levels and access to the area is restricted. Groundwater is not used for drinking or any other purpose.
Boiler Plant Tanks

(Site 13)

Site 13, in the southern part of NASF, formerly consisted of two 26,000-gallon USTs , located southeast of Site 12. From 1943 to 1981, the tanks were used to store fuel for the boiler plant. From 1981 to 1992, the tanks were used for occasional storage of other fuels and oils. About 350 gallons of waste spills, possibly of No. 6 fuel oil, waste lubrication oil, hydraulic fluid, JP-5 jet fuel, or diesel fuel, occurred around inlets to the tanks during filling operations. Soil: Subsurface soil samples were collected during the RI. No contaminants were detected above ATSDR's CVs. No surface soil samples were collected at Site 13 during the RI.

Groundwater: Ten groundwater samples were collected during the RI and analyzed for HBPHCs, LBPHCs, PCBs, pesticides, SVOCs, VOCs, and metals.

VOCs: Benzene (1 ppb), di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (5 ppb), TCE (52 ppb), chloroform (18 ppb), and methylene chloride (11 ppb)were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

Metals: Antimony (60 ppb), arsenic (1,210 ppb), boron (136,000 ppb), cadmium (9 ppb), lead (2,390 ppb), manganese (1,120 ppb), molybdenum (4,250 ppb), and vanadium (261 ppb) were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

HBPHCs (diesel) were detected at a maximum concentration of 240 ppb. LBPHCs (gasoline) were detected at a maximum concentration of 580 ppb.

The two 26,000-gallon USTs were removed during the summer of 1992.

The RI recommended that the site be backfilled with soil following removal of the two USTs.

This site does not pose a public health hazard because access to the area is restricted and people are not exposed to harmful levels of contaminants.

Groundwater underneath the site is not used for drinking or any other purpose. Although groundwater flow could allow contaminants to migrate off site, people do not use groundwater for drinking in the area south of NASF because of the high salinity content of the shallow aquifer.

Old Vehicle Maintenance Shop (Site 14) The Old Vehicle Maintenance Shop, in the southern part of NASF, was used from 1943 to 1946 and 1951 to 1971 to service and fuel public works transportation and other vehicles. From 1971 to 1973, the site was used as an auto hobby shop. USTs at the site stored leaded gasoline and diesel fuel. These tanks were found to be leaking in 1989.

The site currently consists of concrete slabs that served as foundations for a mechanic bay, fueling station, and support building. Two lube pits from the site are now filled with soil. An estimated 150 gallons of lube oil, hydraulic fluid, and radiator coolant leaked into the pits.

Soil: Soil samples were collected during the installation of monitoring wells during the RI. Only one soil sample collected in conjunction with monitoring well 18 contained fuel-related contaminants (e.g., benzene, ethylene, toluene, xylenes, and petroleum hydrocarbons). Benzene (20 ppm) was the only contaminant that was detected above its CV.

Groundwater: Ten groundwater samples were collected during the RI and analyzed for HBPHCs, LBPHCs, PCBs, pesticides, SVOCs, VOCs, and metals.

VOCs and SVOCs: Benzene (14,000 ppb), carbon tetrachloride (10 ppb), 1,2-dichloroethane (2,300 ppb), 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene (1,000 ppb), 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (260 ppb), toluene (26,000 ppb), xylene (16,000 ppb), ethylbenzene (2,800 ppb), di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (3 ppb), 2,4-dimethylphenol (3,600 ppb), 4-methylphenol (330 ppb), naphthalene (7,900 ppb), and pentachlorophenol (2ppb) were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

Two USTs were removed in 1989.

The RI recommended removal of free product in areas where it was accumulating excessively on the groundwater table.

Residual product in soils at and above the capillary fringe should be assessed after the removal of free product.

This site does not pose a public health hazard because access to the area is restricted and people are not exposed to harmful levels of contaminants.

Groundwater underneath the site is not used for drinking or any other purpose. Although groundwater flow could allow contaminants to migrate off site, people do not use groundwater for drinking in the area south of NASF because of the high salinity content of the shallow aquifer.

  Metals: Antimony (60 ppb), arsenic (1,210 ppb), boron (136,000 ppb), cadmium (9 ppb), lead (2,390 ppb), manganese (1,120 ppb), molybdenum (4,250 ppb), and vanadium (261 ppb) were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

HBPHCs (JP-5 jet fuel) were detected at a maximum concentration of 14,000 ppb. LBPHCs (gasoline) were detected at a maximum concentration of 850,000 ppm. TPH-P was detected at a maximum concentration of 110 ppm.

In addition, 2-methylnaphthalene (no comparison value) was detected at a maximum concentration of 6,000 ppb.

   
Old Fuel Farm (Site 16) The Old Fuel Farm, in the southern part of NASF, served as the main fuel storage and dispensing facility from 1943 to 1962. The Old Fuel Farm consisted of four 50,000-gallon concrete USTs. From 1963 to 1985, the tanks were used for dead storage of various fuels.

Fuels stored at the Old Fuel Farm include aviation gas, JP-4 and JP-5 jet fuel, diesel fuel, gasoline, and No. 6 fuel oil. Leaks and spills have likely occurred at the site. The former location of a 5,500-gallon UST is also included in Site 16. As much as 9,000 gallons of fuel may have leaked or spilled at this site.

Soil: Soil samples were collected from eight boreholes and six monitoring well borings. Additional soil samples were collected during the UST removal program. Petroleum hydrocarbons were detected in subsurface soil at levels above NDEP's action level of 100 mg/kg. No surface soil samples were collected at Site 16 during the RI.

Groundwater: Twenty-three groundwater samples were collected during the RI and analyzed for HBPHCs, LBPHCs, PCBs, pesticides, SVOCs, VOCs, and metals.

VOCs and SVOCs: Benzene (320 ppb), 1,2-dichloroethane (54 ppb), TCE (42 ppb), ethylbenzene (1,200 ppb), di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (6 ppb), pentachlorophenol (36 ppb), and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (14 ppb) were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

Metals: Antimony (35 ppb), arsenic (1,320 ppb), boron (80,800 ppb), cadmium (7 ppb), manganese (2,190 ppb), molybdenum (2,660 ppb), and vanadium (818 ppb) exceeded ATSDR's CVs.

The four USTs and associated piping were demolished and partially removed in the summer of 1992.

The RI recommended the soil be removed in the location of the former storage tank near Building 409. The RI also recommended that free product be removed from groundwater at the site.

This site does not pose a public health hazard because access to the area is restricted and people are not exposed to harmful levels of contaminants.

Groundwater underneath the site is not used for drinking or any other purpose. Although groundwater flow could allow contaminants to migrate off site, people do not use groundwater for drinking in the area south of NASF because of the high salinity content of the shallow aquifer.

Hangar 5
(Site 17)
Located in the southern part of NASF, the unpaved surfaces near Hangar 5 (formerly known as Hangar 4) received a total of 4,500 gallons of runoff from aircraft washing activities and aircraft fluid spills between 1943 and 1946 and 1951 and 1987. Runoff may have included cleaning solvents (Turco), lubrication oil, hydraulic fluid, grease, aviation gas, JP-4 and JP-5 jet fuel, methyl ethyl ketone, isopropyl alcohol, and PD-680 (a Stoddard solvent). Soil: Five surface soil samples were collected during the RI and analyzed for HBPHCs, LBPHCs, SVOCs, VOCs, and metals. Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (290 ppm), arsenic (22.4 ppm), and iron (28,200 ppm) exceeded ATSDR's CVs. TPHs were detected at a maximum concentration of 350 ppb.

Groundwater: No groundwater samples were collected during the RI for Site 17.

No corrective actions were recommended for this site. This site does not pose a public health hazard because soil does not contain contaminants at harmful levels and access to the area is restricted.
Southeast Runway Landfill
(Site 18)
The Southeast Runway Landfill, in the southern part of NASF and in the southeastern corner of Site 9, received up to 18,000 tons of waste between 1943 and 1946. No details of the exact landfill location or disposal activities are available, although it is suspected that municipal refuse, concrete rubble, building debris, paints, metals, and petroleum hydrocarbons were buried at this site in trenches no deeper than the area water table. Soil: No surface soil samples were collected at Site 18 during the RI.

Groundwater: Two groundwater samples were collected during the RI and analyzed for LBPHCs, HBPHCs, PCBs, pesticides, SVOCs, VOCs, and metals.

Metals: Arsenic (1,650 ppb), boron (66,900 ppb), molybdenum (2,070 ppb), and vanadium (800 ppb) exceeded ATSDR's CVs.

No corrective actions were recommended for this site. This site does not pose a public health hazard because soil does not contain contaminants at harmful levels and access to the area is restricted.
Post-World War II Burial Site
(Site 19)
The Post-World War II Burial site is in the southern part of NASF. The area received 2,200 cubic yards of trash and other wastes generated during facility decommissioning activities between 1946 and 1949. Wastes, including vehicles and vehicle maintenance waste, wood, paints, thinners, and solvents, were buried in trenches that were no deeper than 8 feet. Soil: No surface soil samples were collected during the RI for Site 19.

Groundwater: No groundwater samples were collected during the RI for Site 19.

No corrective actions were recommended for this site. Since contamination was not observed during site investigations, Site 19 does not pose a public health hazard.
Checkerboard Landfill
(Site 20)
The Checkerboard Landfill, which is on a nearly level area of open ground, is in the southwestern corner and near the boundary of NASF. Between 1951 and 1965, approximately 85,000 tons of wet garbage, trash, and rubble were disposed of at the landfill. Some of the waste may have been deposited at depths below the water table.

Additional waste buried at the site includes sludge from the wastewater treatment plant and an estimated 1,400 gallons of waste liquids (primarily petroleum hydrocarbons). These waste liquids, which may have been burned at the site, were probably from the old vehicle maintenance shop and aircraft maintenance shop.

Soil: No surface soil samples were collected at this site during the RI.

Groundwater: Forty-two groundwater samples were collected during the RI and analyzed for LBPHCs, HBPHCs, PCBs, pesticides, SVOCs, VOCs, and metals.

Metals: Arsenic (1,740 ppb), boron (51,200 ppb), manganese (3,140 ppb), molybdenum (1,980 ppb), and vanadium (190 ppb) exceeded ATSDR's CVs.

HBPHCs (diesel) was detected at a maximum concentration of 72 ppb.

No corrective actions were recommended for this site. This site does not pose a public health hazard. The soil does not contain contaminants at harmful levels and access to the area is restricted.
Receiver Site Landfill
(Site 21)
The Receiver Site Landfill consists of nearly level, unpaved ground and is in the northeastern corner of NASF. Between 1965 and 1980, the landfill received solid waste (wet garbage, trash, and rubble) and about 1,000 gallons of liquid waste (JP-5 jet fuel, gasoline, diesel fuel, waste oils, and hydraulic fluids). Wastes were buried in trenches, and some of the liquid wastes, including hydrocarbons, were burned.

No hydrocarbon waste was disposed at the landfill from 1975 to 1980, and only dry trash and rubble were disposed at the landfill from 1979 to 1980.

Soil: During the RI, six soil samples were collected in conjunction with drilling boreholes for groundwater monitoring wells. No contaminants were detected above ATSDR's CVs. No surface soil samples were collected during the RI.

Groundwater: During the RI, 20 groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for LBPHCs, HBPHCs, PCBs, pesticides, SVOCs, VOCs, and metals.

VOCs and SVOCs:
Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (4 ppb) and tetrachloroethene (17 ppb) were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

Metals: Antimony (38 ppb), cadmium (6 ppb), and mercury (2 ppb) were detected at or above ATSDR's CVs.

No corrective actions were recommended for this site. This site does not pose a public health hazard. The soil does not contain contaminants at harmful levels and access to the area is restricted.
Northeast Runway Landfill
(Site 22)
The Northeast Runway Landfill is an unpaved area south of Site 21. It received an estimated 60,000 tons of waste between 1980 and 1987. The landfill received dry trash, rubble, paint waste, and metals.

In general, Site 22 received fewer hazardous materials than Site 21. Wastes were buried in excavated trenches. Site 22 is located in the northeastern part of NAS Fallon.

Soil: No surface soil samples were collected during the RI.

Groundwater: During the RI, 20 groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for LBPHCs, HBPHCs, PCBs, pesticides, SVOCs, VOCs, and metals.

VOCs and SVOCs:
Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (4 ppb) and tetrachloroethene (17 ppb) were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

Metals: Antimony (38 ppb), cadmium (6 ppb), and mercury (2 ppb) were detected above ATSDR's CVs.

No corrective actions were recommended for this site. This site does not pose a public health hazard. The soil does not contain contaminants at harmful levels and access to the area is restricted.
Shipping and Receiving Disposal
(Site 23)
Located in the southern part of NASF, Site 23 includes the shipping and receiving disposal area, an aircraft burial area, and an area where 9 cubic yards of asbestos and metallic debris from building and pipe insulation was reportedly buried.

In addition to the disposal areas, transformers containing PCB fluids may have been stored at the site. About 1,300 cubic yards of waste in the shipping and disposal area were buried in four trenches and included junk, debris, metal, rubble, paints, thinners, petroleum liquids, oils, and lubricants.

Soil: Four surface soil samples were collected during the RI and analyzed for HBPHCs, LBPHCs, PCBs, and pesticides. No contaminants exceeded ATSDR's CVs.

Groundwater: No groundwater samples were collected during the RI for Site 23.

No corrective actions were recommended for this site. This site does not pose a public health hazard. The soil does not contain contaminants at harmful levels and access to the area is restricted.
Road Oiling Area (Site 24) The Road Oiling Area, along the north, east, and southeast borders of NASF, consists of perimeter roads that were oiled with approximately 37,000 gallons of waste oils, fuels, and solvents for dust control. Dust control occurred between 1943 to 1946 and again from 1951 to 1981. Wastes used for dust control included hydraulic fluids, antifreeze, leaded gasoline, carbon tetrachloride, motor vehicle gasoline, JP-4 and JP-5 jet fuel, TCE, and trichloroethane. Although some parts of the north perimeter roads are currently paved, before 1981, all of the roads were unpaved. Soil: During the RI, five soil samples were collected and analyzed for LBPHCs, HBPHCs, SVOCs, VOCs, and metals.

Arsenic (12 ppm) was the only contaminant that exceeded ATSDR's CVs.

Groundwater: No groundwater samples were collected during the RI for Site 24.

No corrective actions were recommended for this site. This site does not pose a public health hazard. The soil does not contain contaminants at harmful levels and access to the area is restricted.
Non-specific site sampling
LD Drain and LD #1 Drain The LD Drain and the LD #1 Drain are the two main drains running through NASF. The drains carry water southeastward to Carson Lake and northeastward to Harmon and Stillwater Point Reservoirs.

The LD Drain is approximately 25 feet wide and 12 feet deep, while the LD #1 Drain is approximately 12 feet wide and 12 feet deep.

Surface Water: Surface water samples were collected during an 8 week period (August through September) in 1989 from eight locations, four in each drain.

Arsenic (268 ppb), lead (30 ppb), and selenium (60 ppb) exceeded ATSDR's CVs. TPHs were detected at a maximum concentration of 5,000 ppb.

Sediment: Sediment samples were collected in August 1989 from the same eight locations surface water was collected from.

No contaminants exceeded ATSDR's CVs. TPHs were detected at a maximum concentration of 43 ppm.

There have been no corrective activities associated with the drainage canals. This site does not pose a public health hazard. The surface water and sediment from the drains do not contain contaminants at harmful levels.

Sources:

Ecology and Environment. 1989. Federal Facility Preliminary Assessment/Site Inspection Review. July 31, 1989.

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). 1994. Final Remedial Investigation Report. Naval Air Station Fallon. September 1994.

Naval Air Station Fallon. 1994. Installation Restoration Program Community Relations Plan. September 1994.

Battelle. 2001. Assessment of Intrinsic Remediation at Installation Restoration Sites at Naval Air Station Fallon. March 2001.


Table 2.

Summary of Potential Exposure Pathways at NASF
Pathway Name Source of Contamination Environmental Medium Point of Exposure Route of Exposure Potentially Exposed Population Comments
Completed and Potential Exposure Pathways
Off-site private drinking water Fuel spills and waste disposal activities at NASF Groundwater Off-site private drinking water wells Ingestion, dermal contact, and inhalation Residents living near the NASF boundary east of Site 6 (Defuel Disposal Area) and south of NASF Past Exposure: Only very low concentrations of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) have been detected in monitoring wells in the past near the NASF boundary. Based on previous sampling results, it is unlikely that site-related contaminants are impacting private drinking water wells. ATSDR concludes that past exposures to drinking water from private wells posed no public health hazard.

Current and Future Exposures: TPHs and other site-related contaminants have not been detected above ATSDR's CVs in recent sampling of monitoring wells near the NASF boundary. Although it is unlikely that contaminants would migrate off site at levels that would be harmful, it is possible that private wells that are screened in the shallow aquifer and are down gradient of Site 6 could be impacted by contaminants migrating off site. Therefore, ATSDR concludes that future exposures to off-site private drinking water wells pose no apparent public health hazard.

Off-site NASF and city of Fallon drinking water wells Fuel spills and waste disposal activities at NASF Groundwater NASF distribution system and Fallon residences that are connected to municipal supply Ingestion, dermal contact, and inhalation NASF personnel, station residents, and Fallon residents who are connected to the municipal water supply Past, Current , and Future Exposure: NASF and city of Fallon drinking water supply wells have not been and are not expected to be impacted by site-related contamination because they are at least 2 miles northwest of any NASF source areas, the wells are upgradient from NASF, and the depth to the Fallon basalt aquifer is more than 500 feet below ground surface. There is no completed exposure pathway and these wells do not pose a public health hazard.
On-site groundwater Fuel spills and waste disposal activities at NASF Groundwater None Ingestion, dermal contact, and inhalation NASF personnel and station residents Past, Current , and Future Exposure: Groundwater beneath NASF has not been used and is not expected to be used as a source of drinking water or for any other domestic (e.g, cooking, showering) purposes. There is no completed exposure pathway and groundwater beneath NASF does not pose a public health hazard.
Surface water and sediment Fuel spills and waste disposal activities at NASF Surface water and sediment On-site irrigation ditches and drainage canals Ingestion, dermal contact, and inhalation NASF personnel and station residents Past, Current , and Future Exposure: Low levels of TPHs have been detected in surface water and sediment in drainage canals on site. Since TPHs were not at levels that are considered harmful and only authorized NASF personnel would have occasional access to these canals, ATSDR concludes that exposure to surface water and sediment at NASF poses no public health hazard.
Surface soil Fuel spills and waste disposal activities at NASF Soil Installation restoration program (IRP) contaminated sites at NASF Ingestion and dermal contact NASF personnel and station residents Past, Current , and Future Exposure: Soil contamination is limited to a small number of source areas on site. Some of the IRP sites that contain contaminated soil (e.g., the biopile) are not fenced and access may not be restricted. ATSDR cannot rule out the possibility that some exposure to residents of the station and on-site personnel could occur. However, any exposures to soil contaminants would likely be infrequent and of short duration. ATSDR concludes that on-site exposures to soil pose no apparent public health hazard.
Air Emissions from stationary sources (e.g., boilers and generators) Air Non-point source Inhalation NASF personnel and station residents and off-site residents who are in close proximity to NASF Past, Current, and Future Exposure: The results of NASF's air quality analysis showed that the predicted concentrations of EPA criteria pollutants (i.e., CO, NO2, PM10, SO2) from stationary sources at NASF do not exceed the national ambient air quality standards. Recent air monitoring data in the Fallon area from EPA's AIRS database showed that PM10 concentrations were well below EPA's national ambient air quality standards. Therefore, ATSDR concludes that emissions from stationary sources at NASF do not pose a public health hazard.
Jet engine emissions Air Jet aircraft operating from NASF Inhalation People at or nearby to NASF Past, Current and Future Exposure: A toxicological evaluation and the screening model for dispersion of emissions indicate that exposure to emissions from airplanes (commercial and military) in the Fallon, NV area is not a likely contributing factor to the leukemia cases reported in the community. The potential exposure by members of the Fallon community to jet fuel and emission byproducts is not expected to be sufficient to result in non-cancer public health effects. Screening model analyses of emissions from NASF aircraft found that estimated ambient air concentrations for all pollutants considered were either below health-based comparison values or reasonably consistent with levels routinely measured in small communities and suburban locations across the United States. Therefore, engine emission byproducts at NASF pose no past, current, or future public health hazard.


Table 3.

Summary of Contaminants Detected Above ATSDR's CVs in Groundwater Monitoring Wells at NASF
Contaminant Maximum Concentration (ppb) Date Maximum Concentration Detected Location of Maximum Concentration Comparison Value
Value (ppb) Source
SOUTHERN PLUME - Site 1 (Crash Crew Training Area)
Metals
Arsenic 892 NA NA 0.02
50
CREG
MCL
Boron 60,400 NA NA 4,000 RMEG
Molybdenum 1,730 NA NA 200 RMEG
Vanadium 351 NA NA 100 EMEG
Organics
Benzene 800
42.0
December 1991
November 1999
MW 51U
MW-51U
5
0.6
MCL
CREG
1,1-DCE 28
14
December 1991
September 1997
MW-50U
MW-14
7
0.06
MCL
CREG
1,2-DCE (cis) 2,500
1,600
March 1998
November 1999
MW-51U
MW-51U
70 MCL
Methylene chloride 37 April 1992 MW-51U 5 MCL
4-Methylphenol 910 April 1992 MW-51U 180 RBC
PCE 680
30
October 1993
November 1999
MW 51U
MW 51U
5 MCL
TCE 840
13
December 1991
November 1999
MW 51U
MW 51U
5 MCL
Vinyl chloride 3 April 1992 MW-51U 0.03
2.0
CREG
MCL
TPH-E 110,000 November 1999 MW 51U - -
SOUTHERN PLUME - Site 14 (Old Vehicle Maintenance)
Metals
Antimony 60 NA NA 6 MCL
Arsenic 1,210 NA NA 0.02
50
CREG
MCL
Boron 136,000 NA NA 4,000 RMEG
Cadmium 6 NA NA 5 MCL
Lead 2,390 NA NA 15 EPA
Organics
Benzene 14,000
13,000
April 1991
November 1999
MW-18U
MW-18U
5
0.6
MCL
CREG
Carbon tetrachloride 10 November 1999 MW-22 5
0.3
MCL
CREG
1,2-DCA 2,300 November 1999 MW-18U 5
0.4
MCL
CREG
2,4-Dimethylphenol 3,600 April 1991 MW-18U 700 RMEG
Ethylbenzene 2,800 December 1991 MW-52 700 MCL
4-Methylphenol 330 April 1991 MW-18U 180 RBC
Naphthalene 7,900 April 1991 MW-51 700 RMEG
Pentachlorophenyl 2 April 1991 MW-19 0.2
1.0
CREG
MCL
Toluene 26,000 April 1991 MW-18U 1,000 MCL
1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene 1,000 March 1998 GTI14-2 ? RBC2
1,3,5-Trimethylbenzene 260 March 1998 GTI14-2 ? RBC2
Xylene 16,000 December 1991 MW-52 7,000
10,000
I-EMEG
MCL
TPH-P 110,000 November 1999 MW-18U - -
SOUTHERN PLUME - Site 16 (Old Fuel Farm)
Metals
Arsenic 1,320 1991-1992 NA 0.02
50
CREG
MCL
Boron 80,800 1991-1992 NA 4,000 RMEG
Cadmium 7 1991-1992 NA 5 MCL
Manganese 2,190 1991-1992 NA 2,000 RMEG
Molybdenum 2,660 1991-1992 NA 200 RMEG
Vanadium 818 1991-1992 NA 100 EMEG
Organics
Benzene 130 September 1997 MW-63 5
0.6
MCL
CREG
1,2-DCA 54 September 1997 MW-65 5
0.4
MCL
CREG
TCE 42 March 1998 MW-65 5 MCL
TPH-E 26,000
11,400
September 1996
November 1999
MW 77
MW-77
-
-
-
-
NORTHERN PLUME (Site 2 - New Fuel Farm)
Organics
Benzene 290 April 1988 MW-20 0.6 CREG
Bromoform 21 June 1990 MW-FB00 4 CREG
TPH 24,000 ppm April 1988 MW-20 - -
NORTHERN PLUME (Site 3 - Hangar 300 Area)
Metals
Antimony 47 1991 NA 6 MCL
Arsenic 4,430 1991 NA 0.02
50
CREG
MCL
Boron 126,000 1991 NA 4,000 RMEG
Molybdenum 3,440 1991 NA 200 RMEG
Vanadium 581 1991 NA 100 EMEG
Organics
Benzene 2 October 1993 MW 41U 0.6 CREG
1,1-Dichloroethylene 2 April 1991 MW-41U 0.06
7
CREG
MCL
TCE 160 April 1991 MW 41U 5 MCL
TPH-E 1,000 September 1995 MW 41U - -
NORTHERN PLUME (Site 6 -Fuel Disposal Area)
Metals
Arsenic 7,300 September 1996 MW-58 50
0.02
MCL
CREG
Boron 240,000 September 1999 MW-57 400 IEMEG
Lead 110 September 1996 MW-58 15 EPA
Molybdenum 2,200 September 1996 MW-58 200 RMEG
Vanadium 2,600 September 1996 MW-58 100 IEMEG
Organics
Tetrachloro-ethylene 17 April 1991 MW-48 5 MCL
1,2,4-Trimethyl-benzene 31 Sample date not provided GT16-1A 12 EPA's RBC
TPH-E* 41,000 November 1999 MW-57 - -
 

Source: Ecology and Environment 1988; ORNL 1994; Battelle 2001

1 Comparison Values (CVs) for total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) in groundwater are not available.
2 RBC = Risk Based Concentration (RBCs) are chemical concentrations that correspond to a fixed level of risk for water, air, fish tissue, and soil. They are used as a screening tool and are not used for purposes of regulation.

CREG = Cancer Risk Evaluation Guide
IEMEG = Intermediate Environmental Media Evaluation Guide
MCL = Maximum Contaminant Level
NA = Information was not available
RMEG = Reference Dose Media Evaluation Guide
TPH-E = Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons Extractable
TPH - P = Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons Purgeable

Note: In some cases two values are provided for a contaminant. This was done for purposes of comparison where recent data were available and the values exceeded ATSDR's CVs.


Table 4.

Summary of Contaminants Detected in Surface Water and Sediment Above ATSDR's CV's: Collected from 8 Locations In the Lower Diagonal (LD) Drain and the LD No. 1 Drain
Contaminant Maximum Concentration (ppb) Date Maximum Concentration Detected Location of Maximum Concentration Comparison Value
Value (ppb) Source
Surface Water Samples
Arsenic 268 Sept/Oct 1989 SW-06 (LD-Drain) 5
0.02
MCL
CREG
Bromoform 40 April 2000 LD Sewer 80
4
MCL
CREG
Bromodichloromethane 9 April 2000 LD Sewer 80
0.6
MCL
CREG
Dibromochloromethane 30 April 2000 LD Sewer 0.13 RBC
Lead 30 Sept/Oct 1989 SW-04 (LD #1-Drain) 15 EPA
Selenium 60 Sept/Oct 1989 SW-07 (LD-Drain) 50 MCL
TPHs 5,000 Sept/Oct 1989 SW-01 (LD-Drain)
SW-02 (LD #1-Drain)
---- ----
Sediment Samples
TPHs 43,000 August 1989 SW-03 (LD #1-Drain) ---- ----
 

ND = Not Detected
NA = Not Applicable
RBC = EPA's Risk Based Concentrations
TPHs = Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons
----- = No comparison value exists for TPHs in water


Table 5.

Estimated Emission Rates and Annual Average Ambient Air Concentrations
Contaminant Estimated Emission Rate (g/s) Estimated Annual Average Air Concentration Lowest Health-Based Comparison Value Type of Comparison Value
µg/m3 ppb µg/m3 ppb
Acetaldehyde 0.0198 0.024 0.013 0.07 0.04 CREG
Acrolein 0.0626 0.076 0.033 0.02 0.009 EMEG-intermediate
Benzene 0.183 0.222 0.070 0.1 0.03 CREG
1,3-Butadiene 0.545 0.660 0.300 0.004 0.002 CREG
Ethylbenzene 0.0264 0.032 0.007 4,350 1,000 EMEG-intermediate
Formaldehyde 0.347 0.421 0.343 0.08 0.07 CREG
Methyl ethyl ketone 0.00171 0.002 0.001 1,000 340 RfC
Naphthalene 0.0511 0.062 0.012 3 0.6 RfC
Styrene 0.0265 0.032 0.008 260 60 EMEG-chronic
Toluene 0.092 0.112 0.030 300 80 EMEG-chronic
m,p-Xylene 0.0579 0.070 0.016 440 100 EMEG-chronic
o-Xylene 0.0282 0.034 0.076 440 100 EMEG-chronic

Notes:Estimated annual average air concentration is based on multiplying the SCREEN3 output (highest 1-hour average concentration) by a factor of 0.1 (EPA-recommended value for estimating annual average impacts from a screening evaluation).

The table addresses the hazardous air pollutants that were most frequently detected in the engine testing (AESO 1998). This study did not report emission factors for 1,3-butadiene; the 1,3-butadiene data in the table were generated from an aircraft emissions study based on JP-5.

The source document reported methyl ethyl ketone and isobutyraldehyde as a single contaminant, presumably because the analytical equipment could not distinguish the two chemicals. This analysis assumes that the entire amount detected was methyl ethyl ketone--the chemical with more readily available toxicity information.

The following abbreviations are used for health-based comparison values: Cancer Risk Evaluation Guide (CREG), Environmental Media Evaluation Guide (EMEG), and reference concentration (RfC). The lowest comparison value for all xylene isomers was applied to the last two rows.


Table 6.

Jettisoning Events at NAS Fallon 1986 - 2001
Date Aircraft Type Circumstance Volume Location
12 Jun 01
5 Jun 01
5 Oct 00
12 May 00
20 Jul 99
18 Oct 98
16 Apr 98
17 Nov 97
6 Mar 97
8 Jan 97
20 Dec 96
16 Mar 96
22 Oct 95
20 May 95
23 Sep 94
30 Jun 94
15 Apr 94
16 Nov 93
20 Jul 93
18 Apr 93
10 Nov 92
12 Aug 92
22 Apr 92
10 Dec 91
6 Jun 91
15 Sep 90
15 Sep 89
10 Jun 89
22 Apr 89
15 Sep 88
24 Jun 88
20 Apr 88
15 Nov 87
26 Sep 87
10 Jun 87
17 Apr 87
10 Sep 86
15 Jun 86
F-14
F-14
F-14
FA-18
EA-6B
F-14
F-18
F-14
FA-18
EA-6B
F-14
FA-18
F-14
EA-6B
F-14
F-14
F-14
FA-18
FA-18
F-14
A-6
F-14
A-6
A-6
FA-18
A-6
FA-18
F-14
F-14
A-6
A-6
F-14
FA-18
FA-18
A-6
F-14
A-6
F-14
Landing Gear Emergency
Landing Gear Emergency
Landing Gear Emergency
Single Engine Emergency
Single Engine Emergency
Landing Gear Emergency
Flight Control System Failure
Single Engine Emergency
Landing Gear Emergency
Single Engine Emergency
Hydraulic Failure
Landing Gear Emergency
Single Engine Emergency
Single Engine Emergency
Hydraulic Failure
Single Engine Failure
Single Engine Failure on Take-off
Flight Control System Failure
Single Engine Failure
Single Engine Failure
Hydraulic Failure
Hydraulic Failure
Single Engine Failure
Single Engine Failure
Flight Control System Failure
Hydraulic Failure
Single Engine Failure
Landing Gear Emergency
Landing Gear Emergency
Hydraulic Failure
Landing Gear Emergency
Single Engine Failure
Flight Control System Failure
Single Engine Failure
Landing Gear Emergency
Single Engine Failure
Landing Gear Emergency
Single Engine Failure
500 gallons
500 gallons
600 gallons
300 gallons
500 gallons
600 gallons
300 gallons
500 gallons
300 gallons
500 gallons
400 gallons
300 gallons
400 gallons
300 gallons
500 gallons
300 gallons
600 gallons
300 gallons
400 gallons
400 gallons
300 gallons
500 gallons
300 gallons
400 gallons
300 gallons
500 gallons
500 gallons
500 gallons
300 gallons
500 gallons
400 gallons
300 gallons
400 gallons
300 gallons
300 gallons
500 gallons
300 gallons
500 gallons
B-20 8k Agl
Salt Wells Flat 6k Agl
B-20 8k agl
B-17 10k Agl
B-20 10K Agl
B-17 8k Agl
B-20 6k Agl
B-17 10 Agl
B-20 10k Agl
B-17 9k Agl
Salt Wells Flat 8k Agl
B-17 10k Agl
B-20 10 k Agl
B-17 8k Agl
B-20 10k Agl
B-17 8k Agl
Salt Wells Flat 3k Agl
B-17 8k Agl
B-17 10k Agl
B-20 10 k Agl
B-17 10k Agl
B-20 10k Agl
B-20 10k Agl
B-17 10k Agl
B-17 8k Agl
B-20 10k Agl
B-20 8k Agl
B-20 10k Agl
B-17 12k Agl
B-20 15k Agl
B-20 10k Agl
B-17 8k Agl
B-17 8k Agl
B-20 10k Agl
B-20 12k Agl
B-20 10k Agl
Salt Wells Flat 8k Agl
B-20 8k Agl

k = 1000 feet
Agl = above ground level


FIGURES

NASF Location Map
Figure 1. NASF Location Map

NASF Site Map
Figure 2. NASF Site Map

Fallon Area Wind Rose
Figure 3. Fallon Area Wind Rose

Location of NASF Drinking Water Supply Wells
Figure 4. Location of NASF Drinking Water Supply Wells

ATSDR's Exposure Evaluation Process
Figure 5. ATSDR's Exposure Evaluation Process

Location of On-site Groundwater Plumes
Figure 6. Location of On-site Groundwater Plumes

Locations of Areas Where Jettisoning Occurred 1986-2001
Figure 7. Locations of Areas Where Jettisoning Occurred 1986-2001

F-16 venting fuel during refueling activity. This venting is believed to be a result of overfilling during refueling. Although this is not ‘jettisoning' as such, it does provide a visual reference for the appearance of fuel coming out of an aircraft during flight. NOTE: This is NOT an NASF aircraft.
Figure 8. F-16 venting fuel during refueling activity. This venting is believed to be a result of overfilling during refueling. Although this is not ‘jettisoning' as such, it does provide a visual reference for the appearance of fuel coming out of an aircraft during flight. NOTE: This is NOT an NASF aircraft.

F-14 exhaust plume
Figure 9. F-14 exhaust plume

EA-6 vapor trail
Figure 10. EA-6 vapor trail

F-14 emitting heat plume
Figure 11. F-14 emitting heat plume

F-14 dropping flares
Figure 12. F-14 dropping flares



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