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PUBLIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT
LINEMASTER SWITCH CORPORATION
WOODSTOCK, WINDHAM COUNTY, CONNECTICUT


APPENDIX A: Site Location Map


Appendix A: Site Location Map



APPENDIX B: State of Connecticut Department of Public Health and Addiction Services Memorandum to Residents and Concerned Citizens Living Near the Linemaster Switch Corporation Superfund Site

The following section was not available in electronic format for conversion to HTML at the time of preparation of this document. To obtain a hard copy of the document, please contact:

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry
Division of Health Assessment and Consultation
Attn: Chief, Program Evaluation, Records, and Information Services
Branch, E-56
1600 Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, Georgia 30333


APPENDIX C1: On-Site Well Location Map


Appendix C1: On-Site Well Location Map



APPENDIX C2: Off-Site Well Location Map


Appendix C2: Off-Site Well Location Map



APPENDIX D: List of Acronyms Used in This Document

The following section was not available in electronic format for conversion to HTML at the time of preparation of this document. To obtain a hard copy of the document, please contact:

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry
Division of Health Assessment and Consultation
Attn: Chief, Program Evaluation, Records, and Information Services
Branch, E-56
1600 Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, Georgia 30333


FOOTNOTES

1. Please refer to Appendix D for a list of acronyms used in this document.

2. After the site visit, the US EPA provided the following verbatim: In June 1989, pursuant to a CT DEP Abatement Order, Linemaster removed the dry well. At that time, approximately, 1,000 gallons of hazardous liquid were removed from the well and disposed at a licensed hazardous waste storage facility. After the Removal Action, Linemaster filled the area with clean soils, placed a plastic barrier over the soils in the Zone 1 area, and have spread bark mulch over the area (36).

3. When the data presented in the RI/FS did not specify whether chromium was either form (III) or form (VI), the most toxic form (VI) was assumed.

4. Lead enters drinking water primarily as a result of the corrosion (i.e., wearing away) of lead-containing materials in the household plumbing. These materials include lead-based solders used to connect copper pipe and brass and chrome-plated brass faucets. In 1986, the U.S. Congress banned the use of lead solder containing greater than 0.2% lead, and restricted the lead content of faucets, pipes and other plumbing materials to 8%. You may reduce the concentration of lead in your water by flushing your household plumbing. To flush, let the water run until the water gets noticeably colder, usually about 15 to 30 seconds. You may want to repeat this procedure any time the water in a faucet has gone unused for more than six hours. Additionally, you may want to avoid cooking with, or drinking water from the hot water tap. Hot water dissolves more lead more quickly than cold water. If you need hot water, draw water from the cold tap and then heat it on the stove.

5. We assume that adults drink 2 liters (66 ounces) of tap water each day for over one year and weigh 70 kg (154 pounds). For children we assume that they drink one liter (33 ounces) of tap water for over one year and weigh 10 kg (22 pounds).


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