Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to site content
CDC Home

Uranium Toxicity
Initial Check

Course: WB 1524
CE Original Date: May 6, 2009
CE Renewal Date: May 6, 2012
CE Expiration Date: May 6, 2014
Download Printer-Friendly version [PDF - 439 KB]

Previous Section Next Section

Instructions

This Initial Check will help you to assess your current knowledge about uranium toxicity. To take the Initial Check, read the case below, and then answer the questions that follow.

Case

A 57-year-old man presents to his physician for a routine health maintenance visit. He believes that he is in good health. His review of systems reveals that he has a 3-year history of cough. Over the last 6 months, the cough has been productive of small amounts of green or brownish material. He has a 40+ pack-year history of smoking. When asked about his work history, he indicates that he has been employed in a uranium milling plant for approximately 15 years and has been told that his occupational exposure to uranium may be harmful. There is no evidence of renal impairment.

Initial Check Questions

  1. What information should be obtained during the examination?
  2. What additional tests should be conducted to assist with diagnosis and evaluation of exposure?
  3. Which diseases are linked to dusts or specifically uranium exposure?
  4. What risk factors may make the patient more likely to develop a uranium-related illness?

Initial Check Answers

  1. What information should be obtained during the examination?

    The physician should take a full exposure and work history, including

    • job duties,
    • potential exposures at the work site,
    • frequency, source, and duration of exposure,
    • use of personal protective equipment at the work site,
    • other potential sources of exposure, including residential exposures (drinking water source, hobbies, etc.) and exposures to other hazardous materials in this and prior jobs, and
    • a history of tobacco use.

    More information for this answer can be found in the “Clinical Assessment” section.

  2. What additional tests should be conducted to assist with diagnosis and evaluation of exposure?
    • Renal function studies.
    • Pulmonary function studies.
    • Chest X-ray.

    More information for this answer can be found in the “Clinical Assessment” section.

  3. Which diseases are linked specifically to uranium exposure?

    Uranium exposure in the occupational setting has been associated with relatively few medical problems. Renal disease is related to over-exposure to uranium, but it s not specific to uranium. Pulmonary disease is related to dust exposure and is also not specific to uranium. These problems are also not related to exposure to radiation; such problems would not be expected unless the individual were handling highly enriched uranium.

    More information for this answer can be found in the “What Are the Physiologic Effects of Uranium Exposure?” section.

  4. What risk factors may make the patient more likely to develop a uranium-related illness?
    • Smoking status.
    • Prior renal disease.
    • Intensity, frequency, and duration of exposure.

    More information for this answer can be found in the “Clinical Assessment” section.

Previous Section Next Section
 
USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Road Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO

A-Z Index

  1. A
  2. B
  3. C
  4. D
  5. E
  6. F
  7. G
  8. H
  9. I
  10. J
  11. K
  12. L
  13. M
  14. N
  15. O
  16. P
  17. Q
  18. R
  19. S
  20. T
  21. U
  22. V
  23. W
  24. X
  25. Y
  26. Z
  27. #