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Taking a Pediatric Exposure History
Assessment and Post-test

Course: WB 1905
CE Original Date: June 3, 2011
CE Renewal Date: June 3, 2013
CE Expiration Date: June 3, 2015
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Introduction

ATSDR seeks feedback on this course so that we can assess its usefulness and effectiveness. We ask you to complete the assessment questionnaire online for this purpose.

Continuing Education Credits

In addition, if you complete the Assessment and Posttest online, you can receive continuing education credits as follows:

Accrediting Organization Credits Offered

Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME®)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME®) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention designates this educational activity for a maximum of 2.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), Commission on Accreditation

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is accredited as a provider of Continuing Nursing Education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation.

This activity provides 2.0 contact hours.

National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. (NCHEC)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc.

This program is a designated event for the Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) to receive 2.0 Category I contact hours in health education, CDC provider number GA0082.

International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has been approved as an Authorized Provider by the International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET), 1760 Old Meadow Road, Suite 500, McLean, VA 22102.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is authorized by IACET to offer 0.2 IACET CEU's for this program.

Instructions

To complete the Assessment and Posttest, go to Training and Continuing Education Online and follow the instructions on that page.

You can immediately print your continuing education certificate from your personal transcript online. No fees are charged.

Online Assessment Questionnaire

  1. The learning outcomes (objectives) were relevant to the goal(s) of the course
    1. Strongly agree.

    2. Agree.

    3. Undecided.

    4. Disagree.

    5. Strongly disagree.
  2. The content was appropriate, given the stated objectives of the course
    1. Strongly agree.

    2. Agree.

    3. Undecided.

    4. Disagree.

    5. Strongly disagree.
  3. The content was presented clearly
    1. Strongly agree.

    2. Agree.

    3. Undecided.

    4. Disagree.

    5. Strongly disagree.
  4. The learning environment was conducive to learning
    1. Strongly agree.

    2. Agree.

    3. Undecided.

    4. Disagree.

    5. Disagree.
  5. The delivery method (e.g., web, video, DVD, etc.) helped me learn the material
    1. Strongly agree.

    2. Agree.

    3. Undecided.

    4. Disagree.

    5. Strongly disagree.
  6. The instructional strategies helped me learn the material.
    1. Strongly agree.

    2. Agree.

    3. Undecided.

    4. Disagree.

    5. Strongly disagree.
  7. Overall, the quality of the course materials was excellent
    1. Strongly agree.

    2. Agree.

    3. Undecided.

    4. Disagree.

    5. Strongly disagree.
  8. The difficulty level of the course was
    1. Much too high.

    2. A little difficult.

    3. Just right.

    4. A little easy.

    5. Much too easy.
  9. Overall, the length of the course was
    1. Much too long.

    2. A little long.

    3. Just right.

    4. A little short.

    5. Much too short.
  10. The availability of CE credit influenced my decision to participate in this activity
    1. Strongly agree.

    2. Agree.

    3. Undecided.

    4. Disagree.

    5. Strongly disagree.

    6. Not applicable.
  11. As a result of completing this educational activity, it is likely that I will make changes in my practice
    1. Strongly agree.

    2. Agree.

    3. Undecided.

    4. Disagree.

    5. Strongly disagree.

    6. Not applicable.
  12. I am confident I can better provide appropriate clinical care for patients exposed to environmental hazards as described in this course
    1. Strongly agree.

    2. Agree.

    3. Undecided.

    4. Disagree.

    5. Strongly disagree.

    6. Direct patient care is not provided.
  13. I intend to apply recommendations from this course in my clinical practice
    1. Strongly agree.

    2. Agree.

    3. Undecided.

    4. Disagree.

    5. Strongly disagree.

    6. Direct patient care is not provided.
  14. The content expert(s) demonstrated expertise in the subject matter
    1. Strongly agree.

    2. Agree.

    3. Undecided.

    4. Disagree.

    5. Strongly disagree.

  15. Do you feel this course was commercially biased? If yes, please explain.
  16. Please describe any technical difficulties you experienced with the course.
  17. What could be done to improve future offerings?
  18. Do you have any further comments?

Post-test

There may be more than one correct answer. Select the best answer or all that apply for each question below.

  1. Pediatricians can help prevent harm to children from environmental agents by
    1. Counseling expectant parents about how to prevent in utero exposures to harmful substances.
    2. Providing diagnostic work-ups to exposed children.
    3. Advising parents on how children can avoid toxic exposures.
    4. Screening children for common exposures, e.g., lead poisoning.
    5. All of the above.
  2. When choosing a lab test to look for health effects of toxicants, one should
    1. Know the half-life of the substance in the body and test during that time frame.
    2. Use normal laboratory tests only.
    3. Consult with experts, such as poison control centers and pediatric toxicologists.
    4. Use only environmental monitoring to measure levels in the external environment.
    5. All of the above.
  3. The purpose of a pediatric environmental exposure history is to
    1. Help pinpoint the possible environmental agents leading to an illness.
    2. Help guide epidemiological investigations.
    3. Avoid the necessity of expensive laboratory testing.
    4. All of the above.
    5. None of the above.
  4. Some of the topics covered in a pediatric environmental hazards checklist are
    1. Use of alcohol during pregnancy.
    2. Checking the home for common environmental hazards.
    3. Avoiding exposure of children to pesticides in the environment.
    4. Asking about the safety of day care and school environments.
    5. All of the above.
  5. Typical screening questions to rule out environmental hazards during a well child visit may include questions about
    1. Exposures of the parents to tanning booths.

    2. Bottle-feeding or breastfeeding.

    3. Proximity to power lines.

    4. Presence of lead-related hazards in the home or day care.

    5. None of the above.
  6. When taking the history of a child suspected of having an illness with a possible environmental etiology, the physician should ask questions about
    1. Locations where the symptoms occur.

    2. When symptoms occur or worsen

    3. Whether other members of the family are affected by similar symptoms.

    4. All of the above.

    5. None of the above.
  7. After a pediatrician completes a pediatric exposure history for a child suspected of having an environmentally related condition, the next steps to conduct a clinical assessment would be
    1. Construct a problem list based on the detailed exposure history.

    2. Always perform environmental testing to rule out exposures.

    3. Define if exposure has occurred by diagnostic testing.
    4. All of the above.

    5. None of the above.
  8. What is the chief way to manage a pediatric illness known to be associated with an environmental exposure?
    1. Immediately administer an antidote.

    2. End or minimize the offending exposure.

    3. Educate the family about environmental exposures.

    4. All of the above.

    5. None of the above.

Relevant Content

To review content relevant to the post-test questions:

Question

Location of Relevant Content

1. What is the role of pediatricians in addressing illnesses resulting from environmental factors?
  • Clearly define the role of pediatricians in illnesses related to environmental hazards such as toxic substances.
2. Clinical assessment - clinical evaluation of a child with a history of known or suspected exposures.
  • Describe how to conduct an “exposure assessment” (medical and environmental evaluation) of a child with exposures (known or suspected) to hazardous substances.
3. What is the purpose of a pediatric exposure history?
  • Explain the importance of taking a pediatric exposure history.
4. What actions should be taken to prevent hazardous exposures to children?
  • Identify steps pediatricians should take to help patients prevent hazardous exposures.
5. What exposure questions should be included in a well child visit?
  • Describe how to take a screening exposure history for a well child visit.
6. What types of questions should be asked if an exposure-related illness is suspected?
  • Identify exposure-related questions to ask during a sick child visit.
7. Clinical assessment - clinical evaluation of a child with a history of known or suspected exposures.
  • Describe how to conduct an “exposure assessment” (medical and environmental evaluation) of a child with exposures (known or suspected) to hazardous substances.
8. How do you manage a child with known environmental exposures?
  • Describe how to medically manage a child exposed to hazardous substances.
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