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Radon Toxicity
Assessment and Posttest

Course: CB/WB1585
CE Original Date: June 1, 2010
CE Renewal Date: June 1, 2012
CE Expiration Date: June 1, 2014
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Introduction

ATSDR seeks feedback on this course so we can assess its usefulness and effectiveness. We ask you to complete the online assessment questionnaire.

To receive continuing education credit, you must complete the assessment and posttest online.

Accrediting Organization

Credits credits pending

Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), Commission on Accreditation

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is accredited as a provider of Continuing Nursing Education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. This activity provides 1.7 contact hours.

National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. (NCHEC)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is a designated event for the CHES to receive 2.0 Category I contact hours in health education, CDC provider number GA0082.

International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET)

The CDC has been approved as an Authorized Provider by the International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET), 1760 Old Meadow Road, Suite 500, McLean, VA 22102. The CDC is authorized by IACET to offer 0.2 IACET CEU's for this program.

Instructions

To complete the assessment and posttest, go to Training and Continuing Education Online and follow the instructions on that page.

You can immediately print your continuing education certificate from your personal transcript online. No fees are charged.

Online Assessment Questionnaire

1. The learning outcomes (objectives) were relevant to the goal(s) of the course

  1. Strongly agree.
  2. Agree.
  3. Undecided.
  4. Disagree.
  5. Strongly disagree.

2. The content was appropriate given the stated objectives of the course

  1. A. Strongly agree.
  2. Agree.
  3. Undecided.
  4. Disagree.
  5. Strongly disagree.

3. The content was presented clearly

  1. Strongly agree.
  2. Agree.
  3. Undecided.
  4. Disagree.
  5. Strongly disagree.

4. The learning environment was conducive to learning

  1. Strongly agree.
  2. Agree.
  3. Undecided.
  4. Disagree.
  5. Strongly disagree.

5. The delivery method (e.g., web, video, DVD, etc.) helped me learn the material

  1. Strongly agree.
  2. Agree.
  3. Undecided.
  4. Disagree.
  5. Strongly disagree.

6. The instructional strategies helped me learn the material.

  1. Strongly agree.
  2. Agree.
  3. Undecided.
  4. Disagree.
  5. Strongly disagree.

7. Overall, the quality of the course materials was excellent

  1. Strongly agree.
  2. Agree.
  3. Undecided.
  4. Disagree.
  5. Strongly disagree.

8. The difficulty level of the course was

  1. Much too difficult.
  2. A little difficult.
  3. Just right.
  4. A little easy.
  5. Much too easy.

9. Overall, the length of the course was

  1. Much too long.
  2. A little long.
  3. Just right.
  4. A little short.
  5. Much too short.

10. The availability of CE credit influenced my decision to participate in this activity

  1. Strongly agree.
  2. Agree.
  3. Undecided.
  4. Disagree.
  5. Strongly disagree.
  6. Not applicable.

11. As a result of completing this educational activity, it is likely that I will make changes in my practice

  1. Strongly agree.
  2. Agree.
  3. Undecided.
  4. Disagree.
  5. Strongly disagree.
  6. Not applicable.

12. I am confident I can better provide appropriate clinical care for patients exposed to environmental hazards as described in this course

  1. Strongly agree.
  2. Agree.
  3. Undecided.
  4. Disagree.
  5. Strongly disagree.
  6. Direct patient care is not provided.

13. I intend to apply recommendations from this course in my clinical practice

  1. Strongly agree.
  2. Agree.
  3. Undecided.
  4. Disagree.
  5. Strongly disagree.
  6. Direct patient care is not provided.

14. The content expert(s) demonstrated expertise in the subject matter

  1. Strongly agree.
  2. Agree.
  3. Undecided.
  4. Disagree.
  5. Strongly disagree.

15. Do you feel this course was commercially biased? If yes, please explain

16. Please describe any technical difficulties you experienced with the course.

17. What could be done to improve future offerings?

18. Do you have any further comments?

Posttest

Choose the one best answer

1. What is radon?

  1. Colorless, odorless gas imperceptible to the senses.
  2. Radiation emitted by smoke detectors.
  3. UV radiation from the sun during solar explosions.
  4. DThe product of decay from nuclear waste.

2. Which is/are the main source of human exposure to alpha radiation?

  1. UV rays from the sun.
  2. Radiation emitted by smoke detectors.
  3. Occupational exposures from working in a nuclear reactor.
  4. Radon progeny.

3. What is the main source of indoor radon gas?

  1. UV radiation from the sun.
  2. Radon gas infiltration from soil into buildings.
  3. Microwave ovens.
  4. Acid rain.

4. Which of the following is the best method of determining whether you are potentially exposed to increased environmental levels of radon in your home?

  1. If you have an earthy/moldy smell in your basement.
  2. Measuring radon gas levels.
  3. Asking neighbors if they have increased levels of radon in their homes.
  4. With a radon specific blood test.

5. The most important route of exposure to radon is

  1. Ingestion.
  2. Inhalation.
  3. Dermal contact.
  4. Endogenous sources.

6. What is the only established human health effect currently associated with exposure to increased levels of radon?

  1. Radiation burn syndrome (RBS).
  2. Gastric ulcers.
  3. Lung cancer.
  4. Leukemia in children.

7. Which of the following best identifies populations having the highest risk of exposure to increased radon levels?

  1. Women and children living at high altitude.
  2. Pregnant women and their fetuses.
  3. Elderly people living in Florida.
  4. People living in homes so tightly sealed for energy efficiency that the homes do not breathe and expel contaminants.

8. In 2007, exposure to radon was considered

  1. One of the most important causes of blood dyscrasias.
  2. The most important cause of radiation burns.
  3. The second environmental cause of lung cancer deaths.
  4. An important disruptor of prostaglandins.

9. What is the relative risk of lung cancer mortality from radon exposure for persons who smoke cigarettes as compared with those who have never smoked?

  1. 0.8-1.4 times greater.
  2. 2-4 times greater.
  3. 5 times greater.
  4. 10-20 times greater.

10. At which of the following levels would EPA recommend indoor radon remediation?

  1. 0.4 pCi/L.
  2. 1.3 pCi/L.
  3. 2 pCi/L.
  4. =>4 pCi/L.

11. How should adults and children potentially exposed to increased radon levels be clinically assessed?

  1. Blood testing.
  2. Ultrasound.
  3. Long bone x-rays.
  4. History and physical exam focused on lung function.

12. Which of the following is clinically indicated in the treatment of radon toxicity?

  1. Chelation.
  2. Immunotherapy.
  3. Iron therapy.
  4. None of the above.

13. Which of the following is a way to assess potential increased exposure to radon gas?

  1. Whole blood radon
  2. Antigen specific test
  3. Testing the home for radon gas
  4. Urine phenol

14. What should a patient do if home radon levels exceed the recommended EPA maximum?

  1. Make sure all paint is in good condition and wet-clean regularly.
  2. Remove microwave ovens from home.
  3. Cover bare soil in the yard.
  4. Home remediation.

15. Which of the following should be considered in the management of a patient with positive pulmonary findings from the initial clinical assessment when exposure to increased levels of radon are suspected or known?

  1. Radon decontamination.
  2. Cathartics.
  3. Referral to a specialist with expertise and experience treating lung disease.
  4. None of the above.

Relevant Content

To review content relevant to the post-test questions, see:

Question

Location of Relevant Content and Learning Objectives

1. What Is Radon?
  • Explain what radon is.
2. What Is Radon?
  • Describe the main source of human exposure to alpha radiation
3. Where Is Radon Found?
  • Identify the main source of indoor radon gas.
4. Where Is Radon Found?
  • Describe how you can determine whether you are exposed to increased levels of radon in your home.
5. What Are the Routes of Exposure to Radon?
  • Identify the most important route of exposure to radon.
6. What Are the Potential Health Effects from Exposure to Increased Levels of Radon?
  • Describe the primary adverse health effect of exposure to increased radon levels.
7. Who Is at Risk of Exposure to Radon?
  • Identify the population with the highest risk of exposure to increased levels of radon gas.
8. Who Is at Risk of Exposure to Radon?
  • Describe those at risk from exposure to radon as an environmental cause of lung cancer deaths.
9. Who Is at Risk of Exposure to Radon?
  • Describe the estimated risk of lung cancer from radon exposure for persons who smoke cigarettes as compared with those who have never smoked.
10. What Are the Standards and Regulations for Environmental Radon Levels?
  • Identify the EPA recommended maximum indoor residential radon level.
11. How do you Clinically Assess a Patient Potentially Exposed to Increased Levels of Radon?
  • Describe the clinical assessment of a patient potentially exposed to increased levels of radon.
12. How Should Patients Potentially Exposed to Increased Levels of Radon Be Treated and Managed?
  • Describe the clinical management of patients potentially exposed to increased radon levels.
13. How do you Clinically Assess a Patient Potentially Exposed to Increased Levels of Radon?
  • Describe the clinical assessment of a patient potentially exposed to increased levels of radon.
14. Where Is Radon Found?
  • Describe how you can determine whether you are exposed to increased levels of radon in your home.
15. How Should Patients Potentially Exposed to Increased Levels of Radon Be Treated and Managed?
  • Describe appropriate referrals for positive findings during the clinical assessment.
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