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References

  1. National Center for Health Statistics, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Hyattsville, Maryland: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC.
  2. Jaeger RJ, Weiss AL, Manton WI. Isotope ratio analysis in residential lead-based paint and associated surficial dust. Journal of Toxicology - Clinical Toxicology, 36(7): 691-703, 1998.
  3. Manton W, Angle C, Stanek L, Reese Y, Kuehnemann A. Acquisition and retention of lead by young children. Environ Res, 2000; 82:60-80.
  4. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Public health assessment guidance manual. Atlanta, Georgia: US Department of Health and Human Services, 1992. Available at http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/HAC/PHAManual/.
  5. Ecology and Environment, Inc. Baseline human health risk assessment of residential exposures Tar Creek Superfund Site, Ottawa County, Oklahoma. Lancaster, New York: Ecology and Environment, Inc. Prepared for EPA Region 6. 1996.
  6. Malcoe L, Lynch R, Kegler M, Skaggs V. Lead sources, behaviors, and socioeconomic factors in relation to blood lead of native American and white children: a community-based assessment of former mining area. Environmental Health Perspectives; 2002; 110:221-31.
  7. Jacobs DE, Clickner RP, Zhou JY, Viet SM, Marker DA, Rogers JW, et al. The prevalence of lead-based paint hazards in U.S. housing. Environmental Health Perspect, 2002, 110: 599-606.
  8. Ecology and Environment, Inc. Data evaluation summary report Tar Creek site. Site assessment/risk assessment. Ottawa County, Oklahoma. Dallas, Texas: Ecology and Environment, Inc. Prepared for EPA Region 6, December 1995.
  9. Luza, K.V. 1986. A Study of Stability Problems and Hazard Evaluation of the Oklahoma Portion of the Tri-State Mining Area (3 maps). Oklahoma Geological Survey Circular 88, 6/8/05.
  10. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Toxicological profile for lead. Atlanta, Georgia: US Department of Health and Human Services, 2001.
  11. Hough RL, Breward N, Young SD, Crout NMJ, Tye AM, Moir AM, et al. Assessing potential risk of heavy metal exposure from consumption of home produced vegetables by urban populations. Environ Health Perspect 2004;112:215-21. Available at http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/members/2003/5589/5589.html.
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  13. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Ottawa County Blood Lead Testing Project: Atlanta, Georgia: US Department of Health and Human Services, ATSDR, 1997.
  14. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Surveillance for elevated blood lead levels among children-United States, 1997-2001. MMWR 2003;52:SS-10.
  15. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Preventing lead poisoning in young children. Atlanta, Georgia: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC, 1991.
  16. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Screening young children for lead poisoning: guidance for state and public health officials. Atlanta, Georgia: US Department of Health and Human Services, 1997.

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