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Conclusion

Effective community engagement requires a significant commitment to developing and mobilizing the organizational resources necessary to support engagement activities. This chapter has attempted a practical synthesis of how these frameworks identify the capacity needs of an engaging organization, but more work is needed to further develop and validate these capacities and their linkages between the propositions of CCAT, community engagement principles, and the organizational practice elements presented here. Among other considerations, such work should account for the considerable diversity that exists among organizations. Regardless, it is hoped that these practice-based observations and insights will be tested and refined and will ultimately lead to a greater understanding of how organizations must prepare for optimal community engagement.

References

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National Association of County and City Health Officials. Mobilizing for action through planning and partnerships (MAPP). National Association of County and City Health Officials; 2011.
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