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Tetrachloroethylene Toxicity
Course Overview

Course: WB4066
CE Original Date: June 30, 2018
CE Expiration Date: June 30, 2020
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About this and other ATSDR Case Studies in Environmental Medicine

This educational case study document is one in a series of self-instructional modules designed to increase the primary health care provider’s knowledge of hazardous substances in the environment and to promote medical practices that aid in the prevention, evaluation and care of potentially exposed patients. The complete series of ATSDR Case Studies in Environmental Medicine is located on the ATSDR Web site at URL: https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/csem/csem.html In addition, the downloadable PDF version of this educational series and other environmental medicine materials provides content in an electronic, printable format, especially for those who may lack adequate Internet service.

Acknowledgements

We gratefully acknowledge the work of the medical writers, editors, and reviewers in producing this educational resource. Contributors to this version of the “ATSDR CSEM: Tetrachloroethylene Toxicity” manuscript are listed below.

Please Note: Each content expert for this case study has indicated that there is no conflict of interest that would bias the case study content.

ATSDR Authors: Dianyi Yu, M.D.

ATSDR Planners: Germania Pinheiro, M.D., MSc, Ph.D; Brian Tencza, M.Ed; John Doyle, M.P.A.; Diana Cronin

Peer Reviewers: Jessica Weiland, M.D.; Rae Benedict, Ph. D

How to apply for and receive Continuing Education including the Assessment and Posttest

Visit https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/csem/conteduc.html for more information about continuing medical education credits, continuing nursing education credits, and other continuing education units. Access the Assessment and Posttest by selecting https://tceols.cdc.gov

Accrediting Organizations

Accrediting Organization
Continuing Education Offered

Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME®) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention designates this enduring material for a maximum of (1.75) AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), Commission on Accreditation

CNE:  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is accredited as a provider of Continuing Nursing Education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation.

This activity provides (1.5) contact hours.

International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is authorized by IACET to offer (0.2) CEU's for this program.

National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. (NCHEC)

Sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to (1.5) total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced level continuing education contact hours available are (1.5). CDC provider number 98614.

Once credit is claimed, an unofficial statement of credit is immediately available on TCEOnline.  Official credit will be uploaded within 60 days on the NABP/CPE Monitor.
For Certified Public Health Professionals (CPH)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is a pre-approved provider of Certified in Public Health (CPH) recertification credits and is authorized to offer 2.0 CPH recertification credits for this program.

Disclosure

DISCLOSURE: In compliance with continuing education requirements, all presenters must disclose any financial or other associations with the manufacturers of commercial products, suppliers of commercial services, or commercial supporters as well as any use of unlabeled product(s) or product(s) under investigational use.

CDC, our planners, content experts, and their spouses/partners wish to disclose they have no financial interests or other relationships with the manufacturers of commercial products, suppliers of commercial services, or commercial supporters. Planners have reviewed content to ensure there is no bias.

Content will not include any discussion of the unlabeled use of a product or a product under investigational use.

CDC did not accept commercial support for this continuing education activity.

Instructions for Obtaining Continuing Education (CE)

In order to receive continuing education (CE) for WB4066 - Case Study in Environmental Medicine –Tetrachloroethylene Toxicity please visit TCEO and follow these 9 Simple Steps before June 30, 2020

Complete the activity
Complete the Evaluation at www.cdc.gov/GetCE
Pass the posttest at 80% at www.cdc.gov/GetCE

FEES: No fees are charged for /CDC’s CE activities.

CONTACT INFORMATION: Diana Cronin, ATSDR Division of Toxicology and Human Health Sciences, Agency for Toxic Substances and Diseases Registry, F-57, 770/488-3485, Atlanta, GA 30333

Course Overview

This Case Study in Environmental Medicine (CSEM) provides an overview of tetrachloroethylene toxicity. Tetrachloroethylene is a chemical used in dry cleaning and other applications. Knowledge from this course will help health care providers diagnose and treat patients exposed to tetrachloroethylene.

This online course will take about 150 minutes to complete. You may finish the entire CSEM in one session or complete each chapter separately.

The course begins with a patient case study to help you assess your current knowledge about tetrachloroethylene toxicity.

You can earn continuing education (CE) credits for the course by completing it online.

Course Learning objectives

After completing this course, you will be able to

  • Define tetrachloroethylene;
  • Describe uses of tetrachloroethylene;
  • Identify sources of tetrachloroethylene exposure;
  • Describe how people are exposed to tetrachloroethylene;
  • Identify populations with potentially high exposures to tetrachloroethylene;
  • Explain the major pathways of tetrachloroethylene metabolism in the body;
  • Describe the clinical effects associated with tetrachloroethylene exposure;
  • Describe what is included in the initial history of patients potentially exposed to tetrachloroethylene;
  • Describe what is included in the physical examination of patients potentially exposed to tetrachloroethylene;
  • Describe possible clinical symptoms in patients exposed to tetrachloroethylene;
  • Identify tests that can help diagnose tetrachloroethylene toxicity;
  • Describe treatment strategies for patients with tetrachloroethylene poisoning;
  • Identify existing standards and guidelines for tetrachloroethylene in the environment;
  • Identify existing standards and guidelines for tetrachloroethylene in the workplace;
  • Identify suitable self-care for patients exposed to tetrachloroethylene;
  • Identify clinical follow-up for patients exposed to tetrachloroethylene;
  • Describe how to counsel patients appropriately on how to avoid further exposure to tetrachloroethylene.

Key concepts

Key concepts in this course include

  1. Tetrachloroethylene is used mainly as a solvent for dry cleaning and metal degreasing.
  2. Like most chlorinated solvents, tetrachloroethylene can cause central nervous system depression.
  3. Chronic exposure to tetrachloroethylene can adversely affect the neurological system, liver, and kidneys.
  4. Tetrachloroethylene is considered a human carcinogen, based on limited evidence from studies in humans and sufficient evidence from studies in experimental animals.
  5. Tetrachloroethylene toxicity has no antidote.
  6. In December 2020, federal regulations will require dry cleaners in urban locations to eliminate the use of tetrachloroethylene.

CSEM overview

The goals of CSEM series are to

  • increase the primary care provider's knowledge of hazardous substances in the environment, and
  • help clinicians evaluate and treat potentially exposed patients.

You can find the complete series of CSEMs online at https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/csem/csem.html

You can download and print PDFs of this educational series and other environmental medicine materials from the ATSDR website.

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